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HISTORICAL
1994-01-01
Standard
AIR1168/14
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management. The major subsystems required to accomplish the general functions mentioned above are: Breathing and pressurization gas storage system. Temperature and humidity control system.
CURRENT
2012-10-15
Standard
AIR1168/14A
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management. The major subsystems required to accomplish the general functions mentioned above are: Breathing and pressurization gas storage system. Temperature and humidity control system.
HISTORICAL
2001-08-01
Standard
AIR1168/2
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/2A
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
2013-07-01
WIP Standard
AIR1168/3A
This section presents methods and examples of computing the steady-state heating and cooling loads of aircraft compartments. In a steady-state process the flows of heat throughout the system are stabilized and thus do not change with time. In an aircraft compartment, several elements compose the steady-state air conditioning load.
CURRENT
1989-09-01
Standard
AIR1168/3
This section presents methods and examples of computing the steady-state heating and cooling loads of aircraft compartments. In a steady-state process the flows of heat throughout the system are stabilized and thus do not change with time. In an aircraft compartment, several elements compose the steady-state air conditioning load. Transfer of heat occurs between these sources and sinks by the combined processes of convection, radiation, and conduction in the following manner: Convection between the boundary layer and the outer airplane skin. Radiation between the external skin and the external environment. Solar radiation through transparent areas directly on flight personnel and equipment and on the cabin interior surfaces. Conduction through the cabin walls and structural members. Convection between the interior cabin surface and the cabin air. Convection between cabin air and flight personnel or equipment.
HISTORICAL
1993-04-01
Standard
AIR1168/6
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/6A
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/7A
The pressurization system design considerations presented in this AIR deal with human physiological requirements, characteristics of pressurization air sources, methods of controlling cabin pressure, cabin leakage control, leakage calculation methods, and methods of emergency cabin pressure release.
CURRENT
2015-11-19
Standard
AIR1957A
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
HISTORICAL
2002-09-16
Standard
AIR1957
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by hydrodynamic or thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
2016-09-10
WIP Standard
AIR1811B
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide guidelines for the selection and design of airborne liquid cooling systems. This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
HISTORICAL
1985-09-01
Standard
AIR1811
This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
CURRENT
1997-10-01
Standard
AIR1811A
This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
CURRENT
1996-12-01
Standard
AIR6
This publication formalizes the applicable design concepts considered acceptable for "draw-through" cooling of electronic (avionic) equipment installed in subsonic and supersonic commercial jet transports. Methods other than draw-through cooling are covered in AIR 728A for high Mach number aircraft.
HISTORICAL
1994-09-01
Standard
AIR1823
The Environmental Control Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. Development of this computer program initially was sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory. (See References 1, 2, 3, and 4.) It provides techniques for determination of steady state and dynamic (transient) ECS performance, and of control system stability; and for synthesis of optimal ECS control systems. The program is available from the U.S. Air Force, or as a proprietary commercial version. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
HISTORICAL
1996-05-01
Standard
AIR1823A
The Engineering Analysis SYstem (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. It provides techniques for analysis of steady-state and dynamic (transient) environmental control system (ECS) performance, control system stability, and for synthesis of optimal ECS. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. Appendices provide general definitions for dynamic analysis, and samples of input and output for EASY.
CURRENT
2011-05-25
Standard
AIR1823B
The Engineering Analysis System (EASY) computer program is summarized in this report. It provides techniques for analysis of steady-state and dynamic (transient) environmental control system (ECS) performance, control system stability, and for synthesis of optimal ECS. General uses of a transient analysis computer program for ECS design and development, and general features of EASY relative to these uses, are presented. This report summarizes the nine analysis options of EASY, EASY program organization for analyzing ECS, data input to the program and resulting data output, and a discussion of EASY limitations. A generalized computer program for determining transient thermodynamic performance of aircraft ECS, and methods for dynamic analysis of aircraft ECS are discussed in this report.
CURRENT
1954-06-01
Standard
AIR33A
HISTORICAL
1956-12-01
Standard
AIR64
This AIR is intended as a status report on the of E.C.S. to date in dealing with the problem of equipment cooling in present and immediate future civil transport aircraft. Subsequent revisions to this AIR will follow as more information is gathered on this subject.
HISTORICAL
1962-12-01
Standard
AIR746
This document supplements ARP85, to extend its use in the design of ECS for supersonic transports. The ECS provides an environment controlled within specified operational limits of comfort and safety, for humans, animals and equipment. These limits include pressure, temperature, humidity, conditioned air velocity, ventilation rate, thermal radiation, wall temperature, audible noise, vibration, and composition (ozone, contaminants, etc.) of the environment. The ECS is comprised of equipment, controls, and indicators that supply and distribute conditioned air to the occupied compartments. This system is defined within the ATA 100 specification, Chapter 21. It interfaces with the pneumatic system (Chapter 36 of ATA 100), at the inlet of the air conditioning system shutoff valves.
CURRENT
1978-04-01
Standard
AIR732
The discipline of heat transfer concerns itself basically with the three modes of transferring thermal energy (convection, conduction, and radiation) and their inter-relations. In any phase of aerospace vehicle design, the importance of any of these basic modes will vary depending upon the natural and induced environment the mission imposes as well as the vehicle configuration.
HISTORICAL
1963-01-31
Standard
AIR728
This publication outlines general design concepts considered the minimum acceptable standards for use in electrical and electronic equipment. The objective is increased reliability of the equipment without penalizing the aircraft performance.
HISTORICAL
1965-04-01
Standard
AIR806
This document presents information concerning environmental control requirements peculiar to cargo and high density transport airplanes which is not covered in ARP 85 (Reference 1).
HISTORICAL
2011-08-19
Standard
AIR805C
Information in this report is applicable to design and development of aircraft jet blast windshield rain removal systems.
HISTORICAL
1997-10-01
Standard
AIR805B
The purpose of this information report is to present factors which affect the design and development of jet blast windshield rain removal systems for commercial transport aircraft. A satisfactory analytical approach to the design of these systems has not yet been developed. Although detailed performance data are available for some test configurations, rain removal systems will generally be unique to specific aircraft. This, then, requires a preliminary design for the system based on available empirical data to be followed with an extensive laboratory development program.
CURRENT
1997-10-01
Standard
AIR806B
The report presents air conditioning data for aircraft cargo which is affected by temperature, humidity, ventilation rate and atmospheric pressure. The major emphasis is on conditioning of perishable products and warm-blooded animals. The report also covers topics peculiar to cargo aircraft or which are related to the handling of cargo.
CURRENT
2014-07-01
Standard
AIR4362A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) protection considerations for environmental control system (ECS) design. It is intended to familiarize the ECS designer with the subject in order to know what information will be required to do an ECS design where NBC protection is a requirement. This is not intended to be a thorough discussion of NBC protection. Such a document would be large and would be classified. Topics of NBC protection that are more pertinent to the ECS designer are discussed in more detail. Those of peripheral interest, but of which the ECS designer should be aware are briefly discussed. Only radiological aspects of nuclear blast are discussed. The term CBR (Chemical, Biological, and Radiological) has been used to contrast with NBC to indicate that only the radiological aspects of a nuclear blast are being discussed.
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