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HISTORICAL
1976-01-01
Standard
AIR1327
CURRENT
2012-08-16
Standard
AIR1327A
HISTORICAL
1994-01-01
Standard
AIR1168/14
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management. The major subsystems required to accomplish the general functions mentioned above are: Breathing and pressurization gas storage system. Temperature and humidity control system.
CURRENT
2012-10-15
Standard
AIR1168/14A
A life support system (LSS) is usually defined as a system that provides elements necessary for maintaining human life and health in the state required for performing a prescribed mission. The LSS, depending upon specific design requirements, will provide pressure, temperature, and composition of local atmosphere, food, and water. It may or may not collect, dispose, or reprocess wastes such as carbon dioxide, water vapor, urine, and feces. It can be seen from the preceding definition that LSS requirements may differ widely, depending on the mission specified, such as operation in Earth orbit or lunar mission. In all cases the time of operation is an important design factor. An LSS is sometimes briefly defined as a system providing atmospheric control and water, waste, and thermal management. The major subsystems required to accomplish the general functions mentioned above are: Breathing and pressurization gas storage system. Temperature and humidity control system.
HISTORICAL
2001-08-01
Standard
AIR1168/2
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/2A
Heat transfer is the transport of thermal energy from one point to another. Heat is transferred only under the influence of a temperature gradient or temperature difference. The direction of heat transfer is always from the point at the higher temperature to the point at the lower temperature, in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics. The fundamental modes of heat transfer are conduction, convection, and radiation. Conduction is the net transfer of energy within a fluid or solid occurring by the collisions of molecules, atoms, or electrons. Convection is the transfer of energy resulting from fluid motion. Convection involves the processes of conduction, fluid motion, and mass transfer. Radiation is the transfer of energy from one point to another in the absence of a transporting medium. In practical applications several modes of heat transfer occur simultaneously.
HISTORICAL
1993-04-01
Standard
AIR1168/6
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/6A
This section relates the engineering fundamentals and thermophysical property material of the previous sections to the airborne equipment for which thermodynamic considerations apply. For each generic classification of equipment, information is presented for the types of equipment included in these categories, and the thermodynamic design considerations with respect to performance, sizing, and selection of this equipment.
CURRENT
2011-07-25
Standard
AIR1168/7A
The pressurization system design considerations presented in this AIR deal with human physiological requirements, characteristics of pressurization air sources, methods of controlling cabin pressure, cabin leakage control, leakage calculation methods, and methods of emergency cabin pressure release.
CURRENT
2009-07-27
Standard
AIR5715
This AIR describes procedures for calculating emissions resulting from the main engines of commercial jet and turboprop aircraft through all modes of operation for all segments of a flight. Piston engine aircraft emissions are not included in this AIR. Some information about piston engine aircraft emissions can be found in FOCA 2007. The principal purpose of the procedures is to assist model developers in calculating aircraft emissions in a consistent and accurate manner that can be used to address various environmental assessments including those related to policy decisions and regulatory requirements.
HISTORICAL
1992-12-18
Standard
AIR1989A
This method estimates noise for both single and tandem main rotor helicopters except for approach where it applies to single rotor designs only. It does not apply to coaxial rotor designs. Due to lack of available data, application of the method has not been evaluated for application to tiltrotor, or other VTOL configurations, when operating in the helicopter mode. Since there are substantial differences between helicopter rotors included in the data base, and tiltrotor rotors, application to VTOL configurations other than helicopters is not advised. Application is limited to helicopters powered by turboshaft engines and does not apply to helicopters powered by reciprocating engine, tip jets or other types of power plants. It provides noise information using basic operating and geometric information available in the open literature. To keep the method simple, it generates A-weighted sound levels, and Sound Exposure Levels precluding the necessity for spectral details.
HISTORICAL
1989-05-01
Standard
AIR1989
This method estimates noise for both single and tandem main rotor helicopters except for approach where it applies to single rotor designs only. It does not apply to coaxial rotor designs. Application is limited to helicopters powered by turbo-shaft engines and does not apply to helicopters powered by reciprocating engine, tip jets or other types of power plants. It provides noise information using basic operating and geometric information available in the open literature. To keep the method simple, it generates A-weighted sound levels, precluding the necessity for spectral details. The method prescribes estimates for typical helicopter operations; certain maneuvers may produce noise levels different from those estimated. Estimates are given for the maximum sound levels at 4 ft (1.2 m) height above the ground. For aircraft in forward flight, the estimate is given for an aircraft at an altitude of 500 ft (152 m) on a path directly over the observer.
CURRENT
2012-08-16
Standard
AIR1989B
This method estimates noise for both single and tandem main rotor helicopters except for approach where it applies to single rotor designs only. It does not apply to coaxial rotor designs. Due to lack of available data, application of the method has not been evaluated for application to tiltrotor, or other VTOL configurations, when operating in the helicopter mode. Since there are substantial differences between helicopter rotors included in the data base, and tiltrotor rotors, application to VTOL configurations other than helicopters is not advised. Application is limited to helicopters powered by turboshaft engines and does not apply to helicopters powered by reciprocating engine, tip jets or other types of power plants. It provides noise information using basic operating and geometric information available in the open literature. To keep the method simple, it generates A-weighted sound levels, and Sound Exposure Levels precluding the necessity for spectral details.
HISTORICAL
2002-09-16
Standard
AIR1957
This document summarizes types of heat sinks and considerations in relation to the general requirements of aircraft heat sources, and it provides information to achieve efficient utilization and management of these heat sinks. In this document, a heat sink is defined as a body or substance used for removal of the heat generated by hydrodynamic or thermodynamic processes. This document provides general data about airborne heat sources, heat sinks, and modes of heat transfer. The document also discusses approaches to control the use of heat sinks and techniques for analysis and verification of heat sink management. The heat sinks are for aircraft operating at subsonic and supersonic speeds.
CURRENT
1985-02-01
Standard
AIR1935
This Aerospace Information Report provides guidelines for hardware design. Guidelines on such items as engine types, test arrangements, and test purposes that would benefit from the use of an inflow control device during static noise testing are outside the scope of this report.
2016-09-10
WIP Standard
AIR1811B
The purpose of this Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide guidelines for the selection and design of airborne liquid cooling systems. This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
HISTORICAL
1982-06-30
Standard
AIR1813
Document provides information on how military/commercial/gas turbine engine test cell/system users may benefit from this unique Coanda/Refraction concept.
HISTORICAL
1985-09-01
Standard
AIR1811
This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
CURRENT
1997-10-01
Standard
AIR1811A
This publication is applicable to liquid cooling systems of the closed loop type and the expendable coolant type in which the primary function is transporting of heat from its source to a heat sink. Most liquid cooling system applications are oriented toward the cooling of electronics. Liquid cooling techniques, heat sinks, design features, selection of coolants, corrosion control, and servicing requirements for these systems are presented. Information on vapor compression refrigeration systems, which are a type of cooling system, is found in Reference 1.
CURRENT
1996-12-01
Standard
AIR6
This publication formalizes the applicable design concepts considered acceptable for "draw-through" cooling of electronic (avionic) equipment installed in subsonic and supersonic commercial jet transports. Methods other than draw-through cooling are covered in AIR 728A for high Mach number aircraft.
2011-03-21
WIP Standard
AIR6183
This standard should provide accurate fuel consumption prediction methods throughout the flight regime. The standard should apply to any fixed-wing, turbofan or turbojet-powered airplane.
CURRENT
2010-02-01
Standard
AIR5303
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) has been written for individuals associated with the ground level testing of large turbofan and turbojet engines, and particularly those who are interested in infrasound phenomena.
HISTORICAL
2001-07-01
Standard
AIR1839B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development.
HISTORICAL
2008-02-16
Standard
AIR1839C
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
HISTORICAL
1992-03-10
Standard
AIR1839A
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne vibration monitoring (AVM) systems with an emphasis on system hardware design considerations. It describes AVM systems currently in use. The purpose of this AIR is to provide information and guidance for the selection, installation, and use of AVM systems and their elements. This AIR is not intended as a legal document but only as a technical guide.
HISTORICAL
1992-02-01
Standard
AIR1839
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is a general overview of typical airborne engine vibration monitoring (EVM) systems applicable to fixed or rotary wing aircraft applications, with an emphasis on system design considerations. It describes EVM systems currently in use and future trends in EVM development. The broader scope of Health and Usage Monitoring Systems, (HUMS ) is covered in SAE documents AS5391, AS5392, AS5393, AS5394, AS5395, AIR4174.
HISTORICAL
1998-04-01
Standard
AIR1813A
Document provides information on how military/commercial/gas turbine engine test cell/system users may benefit from this unique Coanda/Refraction concept.
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