Criteria

Text:
Sector:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 45
2010-06-29
WIP Standard
AIR6447
Provide aircraft and engine designers with a better understanding of turboshaft engine idle power characteristics and objectives to be considered during the design process.
2017-03-20
WIP Standard
ARP6912
This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) identifies and defines methods of compliance to power available and inlet distortion requirements for rotorcraft with Inlet Barrier Filter (IBF) installations. The advisory material developed therein may be used as acceptable methods of compliance for determining power assurance, establishing power available, and for substantiating acceptable engine inlet distortion for IBF installations. It is agreed to treat dust, ice, salt water & snow as contaminants to IBF for the purpose of establishing power available and distortion. Flight in known icing will be addressed in ARP6901.
2012-06-29
WIP Standard
ARP4056A
Turbine engines installed in rotorcraft have an exhaust system that is designed and produced by the aircraft manufacturer. The primary function of the exhaust system is to direct hot exhaust gases away from the airframe. The exhaust system may consist of a tailpipe, which is attached to the engine, and an exhaust fairing, which is part of the rotorcraft. The engine manufacturer specifies a baseline "referee" tailpipe design, and guaranteed engine performance is based upon the use of the referee tailpipe and tailpipe exit diameter. The configuration used on the rotorcraft may differ from the referee tailpipe, but it is intended to minimize additional losses attributed to the installation. This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes the physical, functional, and performance interfaces to be considered in the design of the aircraft exhaust system.
HISTORICAL
1962-06-30
Standard
ARP704
HISTORICAL
1967-08-31
Standard
ARP996
A tested method of data presentation and use is described herein. The method shown is a useful guide, to be used with care and to be improved with use.
HISTORICAL
1969-04-01
Standard
AIR984
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines the helicopter bleed air requirements which may be obtained through compressor extraction and is intended as a guide to engine designers.
HISTORICAL
1978-08-01
Standard
AIR984A
CURRENT
1965-04-01
Standard
AIR883
(This document supersedes and cancels AIR 12) 'Ground resonance' is a term which originated in the early days of autogiro development in this country. It is a somewhat ambiguous term as the conditions it describes usually occur at the ground but do not have any association with the common expression 'ground effect'. However, the troubles usually associated with 'ground resonance' do occur when the ship is on or near the ground.
CURRENT
1956-12-01
Standard
AIR47
CURRENT
1998-11-01
Standard
AIR4281
Turbine engines installed in helicopters require a highly sophisticated oil system to fulfill two tasks: Cooling/oil supply Lubrication While lubrication is an engine internal procedure, cooling and oil supply require more or less design activity on the aircraft side of the engine/airframe interface for proper engine function, depending on the engine type. The necessity for engine cooling and oil supply provisions on the airframe can lead to interface problems because the helicopter manufacturer can influence engine related functions due to the design of corresponding oil system components. This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) deals with integration of engine oil systems with the airframe and gives information for both helicopter and engine manufacturers for a better understanding of interface requirements.
HISTORICAL
1989-07-13
Standard
AIR4083
CURRENT
1997-06-01
Standard
AIR4083A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines helicopter turboshaft engine power assurance theory and methods. Several inflight power assurance example procedures are presented. These procedures vary from a very simple method used on some normal category civil helicopters, to the more complex methods involving trend monitoring and rolling average techniques. The latter method can be used by small operators but is generally better suited to the larger operator with computerized maintenance record capability.
CURRENT
1989-11-30
Standard
AIR4096
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report is to disseminate qualitative information regarding foreign object damage (FOD) to gas turbine engines used to power helicopters and to discuss methods of preventing FOD. Although turbine-powered, fixed-wing aircraft are also subject to FOD, the unique ability of the helicopter to hover above, takeoff from, and land on unprepared areas creates a special need for a separate treatment of this subject as applied to rotary-winged aircraft.
CURRENT
1991-05-23
Standard
AIR4172
This Aerospace Information Report (AIR) reviews the requirements to be satisfied by the engine mount systems and provides an outline of some suitable methods. Factors such as drive shaft alignment, engine expansion, mount crashworthiness, vibration isolation, and other effects on the installation are discussed.
HISTORICAL
1983-10-01
Standard
AIR984B
CURRENT
1997-05-01
Standard
AIR984C
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) defines the helicopter bleed air requirements which may be obtained through compressor extraction and is intended as a guide to engine designers.
CURRENT
1971-02-01
Standard
AIR947
This Aerospace Information Report deals with protection of helicopter aircraft engines against erosion. Applicability is restricted to aircraft having a disc loading of less than 15 pounds per square foot.
CURRENT
1997-05-01
Standard
ARP1217A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) defines the measurement parameters that may be used by a pilot or operator to monitor the thermodynamic health of a turboshaft engine in a helicopter and the measurement system accuracies desired.
CURRENT
1989-10-01
Standard
ARP4056
Turbine engines installed in rotorcraft have an exhaust system that is designed and produced by the aircraft manufacturer. The primary function of the exhaust system is to direct hot exhaust gases away from the airframe. The exhaust system may consist of a tailpipe, which is attached to the engine, and an exhaust fairing, which is part of the rotorcraft. The engine manufacturer specifies a baseline "referee" tailpipe design, and guaranteed engine performance is based upon the use of the referee tailpipe and tailpipe exit diameter. The configuration used on the rotocraft may differ from the referee tailpipe, but it is intended to minimize additional losses attributed to the installation. This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) describes the physical, functional, and performance interfaces to be considered in the design of the aircraft exhaust system.
CURRENT
1992-03-01
Standard
AIR1289A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) outlines a recommended procedure for evaluation of the vibration environment to which the gas turbine engine powerplant is subjected in the helicopter installation. This analysis of engine vibration is normally demonstrated on a one-time basis upon initial certification, or after a major modification, of an engine/helicopter configuration. This AIR deals with linear vibration as measured on the basic case structure of the engine and not, for example, torsional vibration in drive shafting or vibration of a component within the engine such as a compressor or turbine airfoil. In summary, this AIR discusses the engine manufacturer’s "Installation Test Code" aspects of engine vibration and proposes an appropriate measurement method.
CURRENT
1975-10-01
Standard
AIR1296
It is recommended that all helicopter engine development programs include an evaluation of engine starting requirements. The evaluation should include starting requirement effects on helicopter weight, cost, and mission effectiveness. The evaluation should be appropriate to the engine stage of development.
CURRENT
1999-03-01
Standard
AIR1191A
A general method for the preliminary design of a single, straight-sided, low subsonic ejector is presented. The method is based on the information presented in References 1, 2, 3, and 4, and utilizes analytical and empirical data for the sizing of the ejector mixing duct diameter and flow length. The low subsonic restriction applies because compressibility effects were not included in the development of the basic design equations. The equations are restricted to applications where Mach numbers within the ejector primary or secondary flow paths are equal to or less than 0.3.
CURRENT
1974-10-01
Standard
AIR1262
This document is reissued for application to helicopters. It is primarily intended to apply to the engine or engines, but it shall also apply to fire protection of lines, tanks, combustion heaters, and auxiliary powerplants (APU). Post-crash fire protection is also discussed.
HISTORICAL
1971-11-01
Standard
AIR1191
Method: A general method for the preliminary design of a siingle, straight-sided, low subsonic ejector is presented. The method is based on the information presented in References 1, 2, 3, and 4, and utilizes analytical and empirical data for the sizing of the ejector mixing duct diameter and flow length. The low subsonic restriction applies because compressibility effects were not included in the development of the basic design equations. The equations are restricted to applications where Mach numbers within the ejector primary or secondary flow paths are equal to or less than 0.3. Procedure: A recommended step-by-step procedure is shown. Equations: The equations used in the procedure, as well as their derivations, are given. Sample Calculation: A sample calculation is presented to isllustrate the use of the basic method.
CURRENT
1970-05-01
Standard
AIR1076
This document is reissued for application to helicopters.
CURRENT
1997-06-01
Standard
AIR1963A
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) identifies Propulsion Engineer’s recommendations for the instrumentation that is required for the safe operation and maintenance of turbine engines as installed in helicopters. It should be used as a guide for cockpit layout, as well as a reference for maintenance considerations throughout the propulsion area. Propulsion instruments should receive attention early in the design phase of the helicopter. Maintenance and diagnostics recorders are not considered within the scope of this document. (See ARP1587, “Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Monitoring System Guide”.)
Viewing 1 to 30 of 45