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Viewing 1 to 30 of 855
2004-11-16
Technical Paper
2004-01-3474
Paulo Henriques Iscold Andrade de Oliveira, Rogério Pinto Ribeiro, Ricardo Luiz Utsch de Freitas Pinto, Luciano Saraiva Resende, Fabrizio Nicolosi, Domenico Pietro Coiro, Nicola Genito
This paper present the instrumentation procedure used in order to determine the performance, stability and control characteristics of the light aircraft CEA-205 CB-9 Curumim. The instrumentation used is: i) autonomous acquisition system using micro controllers; ii) solid state inertial platform; iii) pitot probe; iv) attack and sideslip angle indicators; v) potentiometer on control system; vi) load cell on control system; vii) propeller tachometer; viii) barometer; ix) thermometer and x) GPS. Assembly and calibration detail procedures are presented with some results obtained on typical maneuvers. This work, in development on the Center for Aeronautical Studies of Federal University of Minas Gerais (CEA/UFMG) and on the Department of Aeronautical Engineering of Naples University (DPA), intend to assembly a system in order to perform low cost flight tests on light aircrafts.
1999-10-19
Technical Paper
1999-01-5611
Oleg A. Yakimenko
The present paper considers the general aspects and mathematical foundation of the subsystem of on-board universal pilot’s support system, which provides pilot’s control actions support during more or less long-term maneuvers, such as take-off and climbing, flight on a route, surface-based target attack (in case of military aircraft), descent and landing via shortcut-time on-board optimization of spatial trajectories and their head-up display visualization in the view of “road-in-the-sky” image for further tracking in “director with sight” regime or (semi) automatic mode. There are mentioned briefly the main ideas of two specially designed for this purpose “fast” modifications of the direct method of calculus of variations. One (for short-term trajectories with strong restrictions on controls) based on 5th-7th order polynomial approximation; the second (for flight on a route) based on spline approximation.
2012-10-22
Technical Paper
2012-01-2119
Vincent Rossignol, Christophe Bey
Cockpit Display System (CDS) suppliers need to now prepare for the cockpits of the future. The architecture, design and ergonomics of the cockpits have to be re-assessed in order to place the pilot at the center of the system, while taking into account the increasing complexity of the systems. Human Machine Interfaces (HMI) have to be simplified and made more intuitive. Thus, there is a need for dedicated HMI design tools and human-factor-oriented processes that are able to support both the required flexibility in the display creation for various types of interactive displays and the increasing demand for safety in avionics displays. This paper presents a COTS approach to these needs, which combines the SCADE Display model-based HMI software design solution, designed from the ground up for displays with safety objectives, with an associated prototyping and development process largely based upon human factors assessment.
2012-10-22
Technical Paper
2012-01-2121
Jean-Marie Begis
Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) Systems have gradually entered the Flight Deck environments of Air Transport and General Aviation aircraft to support ‘paperless cockpit’ needs. The EFB delivers information management capabilities as an open computing and touch screen-based display in the cockpit. As reflected by the Air Transport Association (ATA) Spec 2200, which defines Information Standards for Aviation Maintenance, there is a generic need for Aircraft Systems that support methods of storing, updating and retrieving digital information traditionally provided on paper: Chapter 46 of this document classifies such needs in terms of Flight Deck Information Systems, Maintenance Information Systems and Passenger Cabin Information Systems. This article outlines how the EFB system capabilities may evolve along with aircraft maintenance information systems to deliver further levels of information management capabilities to pilots as well as flight operations data integration benefits.
2012-10-22
Technical Paper
2012-01-2113
Carlos Lopes Nunes, Samoel Mirachi, Alexander Bento Melo, John Macauley
Embraer began development of an ARINC 661-compliant cockpit display system with Esterel Technologies SCADE Solutions for ARINC 661 Applications. Over the past two years, Embraer has been able to build a fully-functional ARINC 661 demonstrator that includes all components necessary for CDS deployment under the ARINC 661 standard. The ARINC 661 demonstrator includes a fully-compliant ARINC 661 server based originally on Esterel Technologies SCADE 661 Server Creator using an automatic server generator. Embraer had successfully integrated a custom ARINC 661-4, widgets library, with Esterel Technologies widget library, designed with SCADE as the base. Embraer has also developed and integrated User Applications running on a IMA hardware system and communicating with the server using UDP over AFDX within a flight simulator system. This paper discuss the process followed by Embraer for development of the ARINC 661 demonstrator.
1932-01-01
Technical Paper
320042
Harold Gatty
HEREIN the author describes methods and shows instruments, tables, scales and curves used for air navigation. The ground-speed-and-drift meter devised by him and used with such remarkable success in the round-the-world flight with Wiley Post in less than nine days, on which the author was navigator, is illustrated and described. Much has been accomplished in the last few years in providing methods and equipment for quickly and accurately determining the position and laying the correct course of aircraft, but considerable improvement remains to be made in instruments, particularly sextants. No one method of navigation can be used under all conditions; a combination of four is necessary to achieve the best results.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570144
EDWARD L. BRAUN, GEOFFREY POST
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550328
F. B. COLE
The value of systems environmental tests is discussed in regard to flight safety, functional improvement and economic considerations. Environmental tests of mechanical, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems in the laboratory supplement the components tests and provide worthwhile design data prior to first flight. Typical examples of systems extreme temperature and altitude tests conducted at Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, California Division, are illustrated.
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480040
P. HALPERT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470167
HUGO SCHUCK, GORDON VOLKENANT
1947-01-01
Technical Paper
470131
WILLIAM LITTLEWOOD
1990-12-01
Technical Paper
902357
Sheryl L. Chappell
Abstract Three studies were conducted to determine pilots' performance in responding to advisories given by the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS II). Pilot responses were evaluated to normal TCAS II resolution advisories (Study One), to amended advisories (Study Two), and to alternative display formats (Study Three). In the first study, normal TCAS II operations were evaluated in simulated air carrier line operations. Sixteen three-person airline flight crews, currently flying the Boeing 727, served as subjects. Each crew flew eight flights with or without TCAS as part of the full-mission simulation. Pilots' performance of the avoidance maneuvers and their evaluation of the system were measured. When the TCAS was in use, no other aircraft came within 200 ft vertically and 1000 ft horizontally in 96 flight segments. In 32 flight segments without TCAS, there were four instances in which minimum aircraft separation was less than these limits.
1992-11-01
Technical Paper
921520
José Fernando David Farat
A longitudinal guidance function integrating path and airspeed control was developed for an Automatic Flight Control System (AFCS) to be installed in last generation commuter aircraft. The basic control law employs the Total Energy Concept, which provides integrated commands to the aircraft's throttles and elevators. Results of a digital simulation during the approach flight phase are also presented to demonstrate the autoflight and powerplant integration effectiveness.
1992-11-01
Technical Paper
921471
Feliciano Lumini, J. C. da S. Lacava
In this paper, a method to analyze microstrip antennas for aircraft applications is presented. Also, the main steps to be followed in the design of microstrip antennas are indicated.
1992-10-01
Technical Paper
921964
S. Iden, D. Cunningham
Abstract No-break power transfer (NBPT) has been used in the 400 Hz aircraft electrical power business for over 30 years. Initially, NBPT was performed on military aircraft or large commercial jets where the interest was to maintain availability of critical equipment during dispatch. Recent-NBPT equipped aircraft such as the 747-400 and MD-11 have demonstrated the desirability of this feature in commercial airline service. Some compatibility issues with solid-state ground power units (GPUs) have also been uncovered.
1992-10-01
Technical Paper
922010
Paul A. Catlin
Aerodynamically monitoring the performance of an aircraft's lifting surface provides the missing component in stall warning. The missing component is the ability to measure the premature loss of lift due to contamination such as insect deposits, snow, slush, or ice on the lifting surface. Conventional stall warning systems, which use a fuselage mounted angle of attack sensor, do not measure the actual stalling condition at the wing. The key to determining an early stall due to the presence of contamination is to measure the flow directly at the lifting surface. Local velocity changes in a region above the upper surface of the wing provide a consistent indication of an approaching aerodynamic stall even when contamination is present. This method of stall warning also offers new levels of safety during low level windshear recovery and takeoff performance monitoring.
1992-10-01
Technical Paper
921967
T. A. Demosthenes
The Hybrid Landing System concept referred to in this paper, utilizes a holographic Head Up Display (HUD) as a precision monitor for a Fail Passive Autoland System. An industry group of researchers has evaluated two different concepts of HUD symbology that might be used to monitor an autoland system approach andlanding. Set 1 utilized command guidance (flight director) symbology. Set 4 was designed for the purpose of providing situation information instead of command guidance.
1992-10-01
Technical Paper
921970
Randall L. Harris, Russell V. Parrish
This paper summarizes the results of several studies conducted at Langley Research Center over the past few years. The purposes of these studies were to investigate parameters of pictorial displays and imaging sensors that affect pilot approach and landing performance. Pictorial displays have demonstrated exceptional tracking performance and improved the pilots' spatial awareness. Stereopsis cueing improved pilot flight performance and reduced pilot stress. Sensor image parameters such as increased field-of-view, faster image update rate, and aiding symbology improved flare initiation. Finer image resolution and magnification improved attitude control performance parameters.
1994-10-01
Technical Paper
942148
Daniel J. Hannon
Three different electronic displays of instrument approach procedure (IAP) charts were tested in a flight simulator. The first display format emulated existing paper charts. The second added dynamic information of ownship position to the first format. The third contained only tabular information of waypoint names, distance, headings and altitudes. Pilots flew two approaches with each electronic display and two with paper IAP charts. Performance and subjective measures were collected. No significant differences were found on performance measures for the different display conditions. Strong subjective preferences were found for the second display format. The results are discussed in terms of the implications for the design of electronic displays of instrument approach procedure charts.
1994-10-01
Technical Paper
942169
Frank T. Gasper, Anthony J. Cantasano
The use of redundant avionic architecture on modern aircraft for both Flight Control and Mission Management has intensified the requirements for Condition Monitoring of Critical Control and Computational functions. The Application of a REAL-TIME EXECUTIVE MODULE (RTEM) provides a core element of detection for departures from norm or nominal expected performance in such systems. The RTEM performs all Fault Tolerant operations and functions including Fault Tolerant Communication, Inter-Lane Control, Synchronization, Real-Time Task Scheduling, Data Voting, Message Error Checking, Error Detection and Reporting, Graceful Degradation, Dynamic System Reconfiguration and Application Interface Specifics.
1991-09-01
Technical Paper
912144
Bruce T. Clough
Abstract Recent concerns about the susceptibility of digital flight control systems (DFCS) to electromagnetic interference (EMI) have lead to testing a representative DFCS for upset from possible carrier signal modulations.
1991-09-01
Technical Paper
912148
John V. Foster, W. Thomas Bundick, Joseph W. Pahle
Emerging advanced controls technology will allow future generation fighter aircraft to aggressively maneuver at high angles-of-attack. Currently there is a need to develop flight-validated design methodologies and guidelines to effectively integrate this technology into future aircraft. As part of the NASA High-Alpha Technology Program (HATP), advanced controls technology is being developed in ground-based research and demonstrated using the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) as a flying testbed. Efforts are in progress to develop flight validated control law design methodologies and design guidelines which could be used to effectively exploit the capabilities provided by advanced controls at high angles of attack. This paper outlines this research effort and summarizes the design process and preliminary methodologies and guidelines developed to date.
1989-09-01
Technical Paper
892326
J. Grossin, R. Coustalat
For computers under AEROSPATIALE responsibility, two technologies are used in parallel to ease software changes on- board the Airbus Family. In one technology, all computers with a data base have tele-loading capability from a Multipurpose Disk Drive Unit (MDDU). The best known is the FMS but other ones have been designed in the same way; configuration management is performed through the Multipurpose Control and Display Unit (MCDU) in this case. Tele-loading is monitored by the on-board computers. In the second technology, there is extensive use of the On Board Replaceable Module (OBRM) to implement operational programs of all computers on which changes are expected. These modules are in accordance with ARINC 607 and their installation in the computer builds the part number, solving automatically the configuration control problem; special techniques are used to check compatibility between OBRMs of a given set and between this set and the computer hardware.
1989-09-01
Technical Paper
892327
Deborah Miller
Onboard Data Loaders are designed to load operational flight programs into an airborne computer without removing the computer from the aircraft. The load operation or transfer of data from the media to the computer is defined by Aeronautical Radio, Inc. (ARINC) Report 615 (1), and is common for all users. The procedural use of the onboard software loader is standardized by the particular airframe manufacturer. This paper addresses the development of design standards (minimum requirements) for the systems that interface with the Onboard Data Loader. In addition, the paper describes a generalized Onboard Data Loading Procedure.
1990-04-01
Technical Paper
901035
Harry J. King, Peter F. LeFort
Abstract The first production configured Head-Up Display (HUD) was introduced in the United States in the 1988 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme Indianapolis 500 Pace Car Parade Convertibles. The HUD used in this Pace Car was designed, fabricated and installed by a team from Oldsmobile, CPC Advanced Engineering, Delco and Hughes in less than four months. This paper is a brief account of the technical, business and management decisions that helped expedite this project.
1995-05-01
Technical Paper
951446
Harvey J. Geminder
Future aircraft will require actuation systems which offer better performance and increased reliability at lower acquisition and life-cycle costs and which can survive and perform in ever increasing environmental hostility. To meet these requirements, designers are moving toward digital data bus driven, smart actuation systems. The data buses may be electrical or optical and the distributed electronics may be mounted either on or nearby the actuators. This paper describes two such systems which were designed, prototyped and tested, a triple redundant system for military applications and a quad redundant system for commercial air transport applications. Several new solutions were developed to solve problems which were encountered and areas for further investigation are identified.
1995-05-01
Technical Paper
951431
Mark P. Daiber, Joseph Bomba, Timothy W. Swafford
Pitot-static probes are used on aircraft to measure total and static pressure, necessary for airspeed and altitude information. Aerodynamic compensation is often desired to obtain accurate freestream static pressure readings when the instrument is located near regions of disturbed flow generated by the aircraft's forebody. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to analyze surface pressures on the forebody, the probe, and on forebody/probe configurations for a transonic business jet. Compensation techniques and validation cases are presented. Results indicate that CFD can be effective in locating static pressure ports in a region of zero pressure coefficients (Cp).
1995-05-01
Technical Paper
951429
Thomas R. Wayman, L. Scott Miller, Paul G. Migliore
A new class of aerodynamic control devices have recently been designed specifically for wind turbine applications. These new controls were tested to evaluate their effectiveness in modulating wind turbine power output and for slowing or stopping a wind turbine in high wind or loss of generator situations. While these control devices were developed specifically for wind turbine applications, there exists the possibility that alternate aviation uses exist. In particular, these trailing-edge control devices were evaluated for reducing aircraft landing distances, generating rapid rates of descent, deep stall or spin recovery and for high angle of attack control.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 855

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