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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2308
2010-01-01
Book
Jack Connors
This book describes the evolution from piston engines to gas turbines by the engineers who created those engines. Included are hundreds of archival photographs, as well as over a dozen tables listing specifications and applications. The story starts with the founding of the company in the 1920's to provide reliable air-cooled piston engines to the military and to help create coast-to-coast commercial flight service. Pratt & Whitney quickly dominated commercial and military flight in the 1930's - ultimately providing half the horsepower of American engines during WWII. Jack Connors explains how Pratt & Whitney came from behind the competition on developing gas turbines after the war with the debut of the J57, which powered the B-52 in 1952 and later the Air Force Century Series fighters (F-100, F-101, F-102) and the Navy A3D, F4D, and F-8 airplanes.
1957-01-01
Magazine
1950-03-01
Magazine
1952-10-01
Magazine
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2581.01
Paul Dees, Scott Eberhardt
The original paper published mistakenly did not include Paul Dees, Boeing in the author listing.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2581
Scott Eberhardt
Abstract World War 1 began with the airplane as a frail, unarmed means of observing enemy troop movements and ended with the airplane as a powerful, much more evolved weapon of war. There were specialized roles for fighter, bomber and ground attack aircraft as well as newly developed aerial strategies and tactics for operational effectiveness. Many aircraft design technologies greatly matured during the war. Four will be the subject of this paper: Drag reduction, aircraft handling qualities, stability and control, airfoil design technology, and structures design technology. Propulsion and armament also matured greatly but are not discussed in the paper. The discussion of drag reduction will illustrate the innovations of the British on external wire bracing drag, the French on cowl design and the Germans on cantilevered wings and induced drag.
CURRENT
2016-06-16
Standard
EMCB1_1
This EIA Bulletin No. EMCB1-1, "Historical Rationale for Military EM1 Limits", is presented by the Electronic Industries Association G46 Electromagnetic Compatibility Committee. It has been prepared to provide a reference source for electromagnetic compatibility practitioners to enable more knowledgeable application of EMI requirements in equipment and system specifications and designs.
CURRENT
2016-08-19
Standard
AIR5354A
The following is the history of SAE Committee A-10.
2008-08-19
Journal Article
2008-01-2258
Melinda Laubach
Due to current economic conditions, aircraft companies of today are experiencing an increasing need for their fleets to maintain safe operation beyond their original design life. The result is a growing percentage of aging aircraft that must maintain their airworthiness by utilizing standard methods of inspection and repair. In order to determine if potential continuing airworthiness problems exist for the general aviation fleet as a function of the aging process, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) established a research program at the National Institute for Aviation Research (NIAR), Wichita State University, to conduct destructive evaluations on four aged general aviation airplanes. The intent of the program is to provide insight into the condition of a typical aged airplane and to see if a correlation exists between its maintenance history and current condition from a safety of flight perspective.
2008-08-19
Journal Article
2008-01-2259
K. S. Raju, B. L. Smith, F. Caido, C. Gomez, M. Shiao
The fatigue behavior of Hilok fastener joints under constant amplitude loading has been investigated experimentally. The effects of load transfer in an unbalanced joint configuration was characterized in terms of a stress severity factor relative to the open-hole configuration. The experimental data indicates that the clamp-up forces dominate the performance of fastener joints with the open-hole fatigue life being the lower bound at the stress levels investigated. The failure modes were observed to transition from a net-section type failure across the minimum section to a fretting induced failure at some distance from the hole. The experimental data has been used to develop stress severity factors to be used as a measure of the fatigue quality of the fastener joints.
CURRENT
2017-07-10
Standard
AIR5565
This aerospace information report (AIR) provides historical design information for various aircraft landing gear and actuation/control systems that may be useful in the design of future systems for similar applications. It presents the basic characteristics, hardware descriptions, functional schematics, and discussions of the actuation mechanisms, controls, and alternate release systems. The report is divided into two basic sections: Landing gear actuation system history from 1876 to the present. This section provides an overview and the defining examples that demonstrate the evolution of landing gear actuation systems to the present day. This section of the report provides an in depth review of various aircraft. A summary table of aircraft detail contained within this section is provided in paragraph 4.1. The intent is to add new and old aircraft retraction/extension systems to this AIR as the data becomes available.
1921-01-01
Technical Paper
210015
H S MARTIN
The author outlines recent progress by the Engineering Division in the diversified problem of the development of all heavier-than-air equipment, including the 15 types of airplane at present believed necessary to fill Army-Air-Service requirements. The subject is discussed under the headings of the airplane proper, the powerplant, the armament and the equipment, inclusive of illustrations. The development of existing engines, especially the Liberty 12-cylinder type and the Wright 180 and 300-hp. units, is outlined and engine tests conducted with a view to improving engine performance are commented upon. The problems of armament development are stated and the work of equipment development is reported as having been confined largely to crash and leakproof tanks, parachutes, hangars, take-off mats and cameras. Work has been done also on navigation instruments and the use of radio fox navigation.
2000-10-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-5517
Albert C. Piccirillo
This paper traces the life and times of Colonel Virginius Evans Clark and his most well known creation, the famous Clark Y airfoil. Despite that fact that he is today mainly remembered (if at all) for that one achievement, Clark was a many faceted and somewhat controversial aviation pioneer. He designed many aircraft and served in several important military and industry positions both during and after the First World War. Clark's eventful career, the various aircraft that he designed and the many applications of his most famous creation are reviewed.
2000-10-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-5516
Ian A. Maddock
This paper surveys the development and, to a lesser extent, the operational history of anti-armor aircraft of the German Luftwaffe and the Soviet Red Air Force during World War II. Though there were numerous types of specialized ground attack aircraft developed and used during the First World War, this category of combat aircraft received little attention until the Spanish Civil War broke out in 1936 and underscored the vitally important role of the ground attack aircraft. This paper examines the development of a select group of ground attack aircraft: those specialized and designed for anti-armor operations. More specifically, the focus is on those aircraft used in support of the vast tank battles on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. The primary aircraft discussed are the Henschel Hs 129 Panzerknacker and the Ilyushin II-2 Shturmovik, which were built in huge numbers.
2000-10-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-5515
William F. Chana
The first flight of a delta wing aircraft took place in the United States at the Muroc AFB Flight Test Center on 18 September 1948. The aircraft, Convair No. 7002, Air Force S/N 46-682 and designated the XF-92A was piloted by Convair's Manager of Flight Research, E.D. “Sam” Shannon. The author witnessed this historic flight as a Flight Test Engineer on the project. Studies and wind tunnel tests for a supersonic interceptor were conducted at the Vultee Division of Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation (Convair) in 1945. These studies led to the selection of the 60° delta wing plan form. This paper reviews the major differences between the thin wing XF-92A and the thick wing DM-1 glider (never flown) designed by Alexander M. Lippisch in Germany at the close of World War II. The XF-92A used a fully hydraulic irreversible control system for its elevons and rudder. The only airplanes up to this time with fully hydraulic controls were the Northrop XB-35 and the YB-49 flying wings.
2000-10-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-5514
Ray Whitford
This paper deals with aspects of the British Aircraft Corporation TSR2 programme designed to produce for the Royal Air Force a supersonic low-level nuclear strike and reconnaissance aircraft for service entry in 1964. A short background to the project is given, together with a brief history of the progression of the programme. Reference is made to mission requirements, selection of the powerplant, the development of the configuration, mission avionics, and the brief flight test programme. The paper concludes with a discussion of the main problems encountered over the life of the project and (hopefully) the lessons learned.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200022
ARCHIBALD BLACK
A tendency exists in most shops to assume that brazed joints cannot be successfully heat-treated. As a consequence, many fittings used in aircraft work and assembled by brazing smaller parts together are finished and installed without being heat-treated after the brazing operation. This practice causes parts to be used that not only do not develop the available strength of the material, but which are in some cases, under internal stress due to the heating in the brazing operation. Recent experiments made at the Naval Aircraft Factory show that the assumption mentioned is entirely erroneous. The author considers this matter with a view to specifying the use of steels and brazing spelters which will permit the subsequent or perhaps the simultaneous heat-treatment of the parts.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200024
ALEXANDER KLEMIN
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200023
V E CLARK
Following the 1917 recommendation of the Bolling Airplane Mission that great energy be devoted to the development of means to maintain a high proportion of the power of airplane engines at great altitudes, some very creditable work was done. A recent flight test at 20,000-ft. altitude indicates a resultant marked increase in airplane performance. Interest in this development should be extended. The purpose of the paper is to indicate the possibilities and limitations of increasing airplane speed by introducing means to maintain high engine power at great altitudes. The DeHaviland-Four is selected as being, an airplane typical of present practice and the performances that might be obtained at different altitudes are approximately computed, with various assumed ratios of the actual engine power at the altitude to the total weight of the airplane in every case. The accompanying series of curves give the various coefficient results.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200026
SAMUEL R PARSONS
The paper defines properties that describe the performance of a radiator; states the effects on these properties of external conditions such as flying speed, atmospheric conditions and position of the radiator on the airplane; enumerates the effects of various features of design of the radiator core; and compares methods that have been proposed for controlling the cooling capacity at altitudes. Empirical equations and constants are given, wherever warranted by the information available.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200025
GROVER C LOENING
The annual report covering transportation by the largest British air-transport company laid particular emphasis upon the greater value of the faster machines in its service. Granted that efficient loads can be carried, the expense, trouble and danger of the airplane are justified only when a load is carried at far greater speed than by any other means. A reasonable conclusion seems to be that we can judge the progress made in aviation largely by the increased speed attainable. It is interesting and possibly very valuable therefore to inquire into the relations of power and resistance as applied to small racing machines with aircraft engines that are available.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200045
H C RICHARDSON
The development of the supercharger for aircraft engines has led to the possibility of hitherto unheard-of speed of transportation. An analysis of a definite case is presented to show the different aspects of the problem in a practical form, with a view toward determining what can reasonably be expected. An attempt is also made to arrive at a knowledge of the elements involved whose improvement will effect the greatest gain. The supercharger overcomes the deficiency of the ordinary gas engine's serious loss of power at great altitudes, due to its inability to obtain sufficient oxygen for the combustion of a normal charge of gas which, in an engine of conventional design, is essential to the development of its maximum output.
1920-01-01
Technical Paper
200027
S W SPARROW
The very complete laboratory tests of airplane engines at ground level were of little aid in predicting performance with the reduced air pressures and temperatures met in flight. On the other hand, it was well-nigh impossible in a flight test to carry sufficient apparatus to measure the engine performance with anything like the desired completeness. The need clearly was to bring altitude conditions to the laboratory where adequate experimental apparatus was available and, to make this possible, the altitude chamber of the dynamometer laboratory at the Bureau of Standards was constructed. The two general classes of engine testing are to determine how good an engine is and how it can be improved, the latter including research and development work.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2308

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