Criteria

Text:
Sector:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 2138
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0612
Sarita Kumari, Dinesh N Dave, Pankaj Maheshwari
Seat upholstery plays an important role in defining overall interior quality and aesthetics of automobiles. Over a period of time, different weather conditions and varied usage pattern affects the performance of seat upholstery material and deteriorates the interior aesthetics. With this, the major challenge for an OEM is to devise upholstery which can retain the performance over the life of the vehicle with a balance of cost and weight. In automotive applications, different materials are used for seating upholstery e.g. PVC, woven fabric, knit fabric, spacer fabric, leather. This paper will focus mainly on analyzing the ageing effect on automotive fabrics having woven construction. This paper analyses and evolves the correlation of the different woven fabrics used in automotive seat upholstery and effect of ageing due to usage condition (durability) and climatic conditions.
2009-11-10
Technical Paper
2009-01-3168
Amitabh Pal, Balraj Gupta, K. Hans Raj, Rahul Swarup Sharma, Shanti Swarup Sharma, Rajat Setia
A requirement of low cost, pollution free, flexible shelter was required for storing and housing costly equipment in remote areas. As such, a concept of an inflatable structure was thought of. This inflatable flexible structure is a mobile system, which could be used for housing costly equipment for providing emergency services, or used as transit camp at remote places. The flexible dome would be required to be inflated with air blowers for 4 to 5 hrs initially. These air blowers would be required to be operated continuously, for maintaining a constant pressure of about 4 mbar inside the envelope. Further it is provided with air conditioning units for controlling the temperature and humidity inside the envelope. The hemispherical structure is fabricated from coated fabrics having resistance to environmental degradation. It is also designed to withstand external wind speed up to 100 kmph.
2009-07-12
Technical Paper
2009-01-2473
James R. Gaier, Mary Ann Meador, Kerry J. Rogers, Brennan H. Sheehy
A protocol has been developed that produced the type of lunar soil abrasion damage observed on Apollo spacesuits. This protocol was then applied to four materials (Kevlar®, Vectran®, Orthofabric, and Tyvek®) that are candidates for advanced spacesuits. Three of the four new candidate fabrics (all but Vectran®) were effective at keeping the dust from penetrating to layers beneath. In the cases of Kevlar® and Orthofabric this was accomplished by the addition of a silicone layer. In the case of Tyvek®, the paper structure was dense enough to block dust transport. The least abrasive damage was suffered by the Tyvek®. This was thought to be due in large part to its non-woven paper structure. The woven structures were all abraded where the top of the weave was struck by the abrasive. Of these, the Orthofabric suffered the least wear, with both Vectran® and Kevlar® suffering considerably more extensive filament breakage.
2006-07-17
Technical Paper
2006-01-2233
Pablo de León, Mark Williamson, Shan de Silva, Jennifer Untener, Gary L. Harris
Over a one-year period beginning in March, 2005, and with a materials budget of approximately $25,000, the North Dakota Space Grant Consortium developed a pressurized planetary space suit concept demonstrator in conjunction with institutions of higher education across the state. This project sought to combine educational instruction in space suit design and manufacturing while simultaneously developing a usable test article incorporating technical approaches appropriate to the project's schedule and budgetary constraints. The North Dakota Experimental (NDX) Suit serves as a testbed for new planetary suit materials and component assemblies. Designed around a dual-plane enclosure ring built on a composite hard upper torso (HUT), the NDX is designed for an operating differential pressure of 26.2 kPa. In order to test a two-chamber suit concept, the NDX features a neck dam assembly that divides the helmet breathing cavity from the body below the neck.
2008-06-29
Technical Paper
2008-01-1990
Janet Ferl, Linda Hewes, Bobby Jones, Lindsay Aitchison, Ed Hodgson, Christopher Pastore, Bryce Beamer, Frank Sneeringer
Effective thermal and micrometeoroid protection as afforded by the Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment (TMG) is critical in achieving safe and efficient missions. It is also critical that the TMG does not increase torque or decreased range of motion which can cause crewmember discomfort, fatigue, and reduced efficiency. For future exploration missions, removable and replaceable TMGs will allow the use of different pressure garment protective covers and TMG configurations for launch, re-entry, 0-G Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), and lunar surface EVA. A study was conducted with the goal of developing high Technology Readiness Level (TRL), scalable, interface design concepts for TMG systems. The affects of TMG segmentation on mobility and donning were assessed. Closure mechanisms were investigated and tested to determine their operability after exposure to lunar dust. A TMG configuration with the optimum number of segments and location of interfaces was selected for the Mark III spacesuit.
1992-07-01
Technical Paper
921255
John A. Main, Steven W. Peterson, Alvin M. Strauss
Structural modelling of the EVA glove indicates that flexibility in the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint can be improved by selectively lowering the elasticity of the glove fabric. Two strategies are used to accomplish this. One method uses coil springs on the back of the glove to carry the tension in the glove skin due to pressurization. These springs carry the loads normally borne by the glove fabric, but are more easily deformed. An active system was also designed for the same purpose and uses gas filled bladders attached to the back of the EVA glove that change the dimensions of the back of the glove and allow the glove to bend at the MCP joint, thus providing greater flexibility at this joint. A threshold control scheme was devised to control the action of the joint actuators. Input to the controller was provided by thin resistive pressure sensors placed between the hand and the pressurized glove.
1996-05-01
Technical Paper
961322
Gerald Maxwell, David A. Brown
Phase Change Materials once were an interesting phenomena in search of applications. This is no longer true. Advances in encapsulating phase change materials into microscopically thin shells permits their insertion into a wide varity of host materials. As the technology has developed, new applications are being found in a wide variety of areas. Some applications include temperature controlled suits for firefighters and military personnel, structural panels that absorb transient heat loads, and high heat capacity cooling fluids. This paper will cover the current applications being studied for these materials and propose possible future applications. In many cases, the application of these materials is only hampered by not enough people being aware of their capabilities. This paper will detail the Phase Change Materials (PCM) effort and future directions as developed by the U.S. Air Force Wright Laboratory's Flight Dynamics Directorate.
1993-07-01
Technical Paper
932101
U. Rieck, W. Fischer, G. Kleen, D. Müller-Wiesner, K. H. Stecher, J. Walter, J. Witt, L. Fanchi
During Extravehicular Activities (EVA) an astronaut has to be protected against various external factors ranging from mechanical hazards to solar radiation and micrometeoroids. An important element in this external protection is the outermost fabric layer. It has to ensure the mechanical protection of the pressure retention bladder and at the same time - by its thermooptical properties - plays an important role in the thermal control of the space suit. New weaving and knitting technologies enable the fabrication of so-called 3-D fabrics with interconnected layers and local variation of properties in one manufacturing step. By this a tailored design of protection properties is possible. A study has been performed to define concepts adapted for use on a European Space Suit. Different fabric samples were manufactured and tested, amongst others, for strength, flexibility, puncture and wear resistance, UV stability, flammability, out/offgassing and micrometeoroid protection effctiveness.
2000-07-10
Technical Paper
2000-01-2254
Evelyne S. Orndoff, Mansour H. Mohamed
Most of the studies conducted on the design of inflated fabric structures for space applications have focused on types of yarns and coating selection. The design of seams along with materials selection considerations is also crucial to the design of inflatable structures. This paper presents a pilot study of the modes of failure for fabrics with two selected sewn seams under biaxial stress loading. A literature review of sewn seam testing techniques reveals that conventional methods do not accurately simulate the biaxial stresses to which inflated fabrics are subjected. In this study, biaxial stresses are obtained by using a cylindrical pressure testing apparatus developed originally for testing seam design for an inflatable Lunar habitat. The unique features of the test method for sewn seams of fabrics by cylindrical pressure loading are described. Test data is presented, and the sensitivity of the test to changes is also discussed.
2001-07-09
Technical Paper
2001-01-2379
L. Ya. Paderin
The method and the facility for investigations of radiant characteristics (total emissivity, transparence and reflectance) of semi-transparent fabrics and films are presented. The method is based on a measurements and comparison of effective emissivity of a test sample with two different opaque sublayers, whose radiant characteristics are known. These emissivity measurements are performed at the same temperatures. The determination of effective total emissivity of is carried out by means of the measurement of total radiant flux of a test sample with sublayer when ones are rotated in a heating isothermal zone with a controllable temperature. Facility permits to determine both the normal and hemispherical above radiant characteristics of semi-transparent fabrics and films in the temperature range from 300 to 900 K. The investigation results obtained for three glass fabrics are presented.
2001-07-09
Technical Paper
2001-01-2384
B. Eu. Zhestkov, I. V. Yegorov, W. P. P. Fischer, J. Antonenko
22 Flexible External Insulation (FEI) Blankets of various types were subjected to a plasma aging in simulated reentry conditions in TsAGI’s VAT-104 windtunnel in the frame of 4 test campaigns on FEI characterization. Blankets were tested at top side temperature Tw =800…1200°C during 60 min each. Widespread numerical simulation of the test conditions and the model heating was performed using full Navier-Stokes equations. FEI catalyticity obtained from correlation between measured and calculated heat fluxes is Kw=1…10m/s.
1970-02-01
Technical Paper
700754
James M. Comstock
The Deep Submergence Rescue Vehicle (DSRV) represents a challenge in advancement of materials and undersea technology. The unique mission of the DSRV requires the submersible to be transported by air within a C-141 aircraft; this unusual transport mode gives rise to the need for aerospace techniques of weight reduction and control. The DSRV was launched Jan. 24, 1970 at the Lockheed Ocean Laboratory, San Diego, which culminated over 3-1/2 years of work by the Ocean Systems Organization of Lockheed.
1971-02-01
Technical Paper
710797
Elliott A. Kasten
The basic procedure for fabricating ceramic multilayer boards, for use with beam lead, flip chip, or flying lead semi-conductor devices is described.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640280
J. T. Harris
The paper presents a new technology in expandable structures, the use of woven AIRMAT cloth. Methods for stress and weight analysis are outlined. The new weaving machinery necessary to achieve deep panel construction using either textile or metal yarns is described.
1962-01-01
Technical Paper
620337
J. T. Harris
Materials used in expandable structures for aerospace missions must be flexible, have high temperature resistance, and show high strength-weight ratios. This article discusses the development and technology of such materials and their use with the various categories of space vehicles.
2014-01-29
WIP Standard
AIR6292
The SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is intended to be used as a process verification guide for evaluating implementation of key factors in bonded repair of fiber reinforced composite structure in a repair shop environment. The guide will be used in conjunction with a regulatory approved and substantiated repair, and is intended to promote consistency and reliability.
1964-01-01
Technical Paper
640521
Richard L. Peterson
The Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory net seat research program is discussed. Net crew seat prototypes evaluated provided excellent body support during 1 g comfort studies and centrifuge exposure up to 16.5 g's. However, undesirable seat occupant rebound occurred during low frequency vibration and ground landing impact experiments. An experimental net seat system is presented, designed to eliminate seat occupant rebound without compromising comfort and sustained acceleration support properties. Prototype 16 gaft facing passenger seats utilizing the net body support approach were designed, dynamically evaluated, and finally rejected due to excessive weight and failure to meet strength criteria. Several seating configurations utilizing the net seat technique for body support are discussed.
CURRENT
2011-08-25
Standard
AMS3271B
This specification covers a polychloroprene-coated, one side only, nylon knit in the form of cloth.
HISTORICAL
2011-08-25
Standard
AMS3271
This specification covers a polychloroprene-coated, one side only, nylon knit in the form of cloth.
HISTORICAL
2011-08-25
Standard
AMS3272
This specification and its supplementary detail specifications cover a woven nylon cloth coated with polyether (EU) urethane which is thermally, radio frequency, or ultrasonically sealable and having air holding characteristics.
HISTORICAL
1990-07-01
Standard
AMS3271A
This specification covers a polychloroprene−coated, one side only, nylon knit in the form of cloth.
HISTORICAL
1990-07-01
Standard
AMS3272A
This specification and its supplementary detail specifications cover a woven nylon cloth coated with polyether (EU) urethane.
CURRENT
2011-08-25
Standard
AMS3272B
This specification and its supplementary detail specifications cover a woven nylon cloth coated with polyether (EU) urethane.
CURRENT
2002-12-16
Standard
AMS3288
CURRENT
1982-01-01
Standard
AMS3287
CURRENT
2002-12-16
Standard
AMS3290
CURRENT
2002-12-16
Standard
AMS3291
CURRENT
2008-12-29
Standard
AMS3901/7D
This specification covers one type of organic fiber in the form of yarn. The product shall be formed as a multiplicity of filaments drawn together and gathered into an approximately parallel arrangement.
HISTORICAL
1996-02-01
Standard
AMS3901/7B
This specification covers one type of organic fiber in the form of yarn. The product shall be formed as a multiplicity of filaments drawn together and gathered into an approximately parallel arrangement.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2138

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: