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Viewing 1 to 30 of 706
1938-01-01
Technical Paper
380123
W. G. Harvey
OUTSTANDING characteristics of magnesium castings are light weight and excellent machinability. Production has increased from about 10,000 lb. in 1925 to approximately 800,000 lb. in 1936. Differences in foundry methods from those practiced for other common metals are pointed out. The mechanical properties are specified, and inspection methods are described. Suggestions are given for proper design of castings. Machining methods and tool design suitable for obtaining the smooth finish, the speeds, and economies that are possible for magnesium-alloy castings are described. Careful painting under approved methods is recommended. Applications of magnesium castings for many parts of aircraft engines, for parts in the fuselage, and in such accessories as aircraft landing wheels and starters are listed, along with other typical applications.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570009
W. A. Beck
GENERAL techniques used in the weld repair of magnesium aircraft castings by both gas and arc welding methods are described here. Coverage is given to equipment, methods of surface preparation, preheating, welding procedure, post-heat-treatment. Some typical arc weld repair jobs are described and illustrated. Included also are descriptions of weld defects encountered because of poor welding technique. Typical mechanical property data are shown.
1991-02-01
Technical Paper
910922
Mark F. Mosser
The corrosion of active metals such as magnesium and aluminum continues in spite of the recent development of more corrosion resistant alloys. Much of the corrosion occurs due to chloride ion attack aggravated by design problems that produce crevices and other corrosion prone surfaces. Many components made of obsolete alloys remain in service. In this paper basic protection schemes are reviewed for both magnesium and aluminum. Pretreatments and coating systems typically used are outlined with emphasis on problems at overhaul and reassembly. A novel coating primer/sealer process is described which provides a significantly more corrosion resistant surface for both magnesium and aluminum alloys. A mechanism for the operation of the coating film is offered; how it is combined with pretreatments to seal and prime the active metal surface is described. Data is supplied indicating corrosion resistance in salt spray tests, humidity tests and exposure to aerospace fluids.
1968-02-01
Technical Paper
680648
J. S. Bleymaier, Milton Weiss
Beryllium offers many advantages in aerospace applications. However, its brittleness, notch sensitivity, high cost, and difficulty in fabricating have limited its use to date. This paper discusses these problems in detail, along with applications in which these disadvantages can be overcome. The peculiar properties of beryllium can be utilized to advantage if the system is weight critical, thermal expansion sensitive, or subject to high loadings at high temperature. Other areas are when the structure is deflection critical or the packaging volume for erectables is limited. In these areas, the metal can be utilized successfully if the loads are well defined, the design avoids brittle fracture, no impact loads are encountered, and redundant structure design is possible.
1966-02-01
Technical Paper
660652
Raymond W. Fenn, Donald D. Crooks, Roy W. Brodie, Stanley Chinowsky
New mechanical property data on the 62% Be, 38% Al alloy, “Lockalloy,” are presented and compared with other lightweight structural metals. The new data consist of tentative design properties for annealed sheet and provide a summary of its characteristics and properties. Material comparisons are made on the basis of gross fracture stress, an elastic weight index for compression critical structures, and on the basis of tensile strength/density and tensile yield strength/density ratios as a function of temperature for tension critical structures.
1940-01-01
Technical Paper
400157
L. B. GRANT
THIS paper reviews the progress made and discusses the problems encountered by aircraft manufacturers in the production of airplane parts made from magnesium alloys. Although the procedures instrumental to the use of magnesium alloys are not unduly difficult or complicated, they should be well understood and rigidly followed so that the best results can be obtained from the use of magnesium. The composition, mechanical properties, and correlations with Government specifications are given in seven tables. Specific recommendations are made on design, pattern construction, chemical surface treatments, machining, assembly protection, and painting. Information also is given on welding, riveting, and forming of sheet and extruded shapes.
1946-01-01
Technical Paper
460161
J. C. DeHAVEN
1944-01-01
Technical Paper
440150
J. C. MATHES
THE tremendous increase in the production of magnesium and the greater incentive to utilize it in reducing the weight of combat airplanes has required information regarding it which is not now covered in the literature or technical handbooks. In this paper, Mr. Mathes makes available generally some of the more recent information on magnesium which has resulted, in many cases, from questions raised by the aircraft industry itself. The specific subjects covered are availability, choice of alloys, surface treatment and painting, stress corrosion, joining methods, service experience, effect of gunfire, and primary structures.
HISTORICAL
1942-03-01
Standard
AMS5025
CURRENT
2016-05-17
Standard
AMS4321B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of die forgings, hand forgings, and forging stock.
1942-01-01
Standard
AMS4076
1. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: A vendor shall mention this specification number and its revision letter in all quotations and when acknowledging purchase orders. 2. COM1POSITION: Silicon 45 to 65% of magnesium content Magnesium 1.10 - 1.40 Chromium 0.15 - 0.35 Iron 0.35 max Copper 0.10 max Titanium 0.10 max Manganese 0.10 max Zino 0.10 max Other Impurities, each 0.05 max Other Impurities, total 0.15 max Aluminum remainder
1945-11-01
Standard
AMS4076B
1. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: A vendor shall mention this specification number and its revision letter in all quotations and when acknowledging purchase orders. 2. COM1POSITION: Silicon 45 to 65% of magnesium content Magnesium 1.10 - 1.40 Chromium 0.15 - 0.35 Iron 0.35 max Copper 0.10 max Titanium 0.10 max Manganese 0.10 max Zino 0.10 max Other Impurities, each 0.05 max Other Impurities, total 0.15 max Aluminum remainder
1942-12-01
Standard
AMS4076A
1. ACKNOWLEDGMENT: A vendor shall mention this specification number and its revision letter in all quotations and when acknowledging purchase orders. 2. COM1POSITION: Silicon 45 to 65% of magnesium content Magnesium 1.10 - 1.40 Chromium 0.15 - 0.35 Iron 0.35 max Copper 0.10 max Titanium 0.10 max Manganese 0.10 max Zino 0.10 max Other Impurities, each 0.05 max Other Impurities, total 0.15 max Aluminum remainder
HISTORICAL
1941-11-01
Standard
AMS4380
CURRENT
1947-07-01
Standard
AMS4380A
CURRENT
2002-12-16
Standard
AMS4381
CURRENT
2016-06-06
Standard
AMS4357
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of die forgings from 2 inches (50.8 mm) to 10 inches (254 mm) in nominal thickness and forging stock of any size (see 8.5).
HISTORICAL
1940-01-22
Standard
AMS4370
CURRENT
1952-02-15
Standard
AMS4370A
HISTORICAL
1994-04-01
Standard
AMS4417
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
HISTORICAL
2005-08-29
Standard
AMS4417A
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
CURRENT
2011-05-25
Standard
AMS4417B
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
2016-04-05
WIP Standard
AMS4417C
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
CURRENT
2006-06-21
Standard
AMS4419C
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
HISTORICAL
1979-10-15
Standard
AMS4419
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
HISTORICAL
1987-04-01
Standard
AMS4419A
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
HISTORICAL
1994-04-01
Standard
AMS4426
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
HISTORICAL
2003-08-21
Standard
AMS4426A
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
CURRENT
2013-09-18
Standard
AMS4426B
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of sand castings.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 706

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