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Viewing 1 to 30 of 55
CURRENT
2015-03-17
Standard
J1829_201503
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. This ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels - gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels - that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio or same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
HISTORICAL
2002-10-31
Standard
J1829_200210
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. This ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels--gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels--that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio or same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
HISTORICAL
1992-05-01
Standard
J1829_199205
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. The ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels--gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels--that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio of same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This report summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
HISTORICAL
1997-12-01
Standard
J1829_199712
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. The ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels—gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuel—-that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio of same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
HISTORICAL
1987-06-01
Standard
J1829_198706
The mass of air required to burn a unit mass of fuel with no excess of oxygen or fuel left over is known as the stoichiometric air-fuel ratio. This ratio varies appreciably over the wide range of fuels--gasolines, diesel fuels, and alternative fuels--that might be considered for use in automotive engines. Although performance of engines operating on different fuels may be compared at the same air-fuel ratio or same fuel-air ratio, it is more appropriate to compare operation at the same equivalence ratio, for which a knowledge of stoichiometric air-fuel ratio is a prerequisite. This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the computation of stoichiometric air-fuel ratios from a knowledge of a composition of air and the elemental composition of the fuel without a need for any information on the molecular weight of the fuel.
CURRENT
2014-12-11
Standard
J3050_201412
2012-09-13
WIP Standard
J3019
this is the first report that has been generated for TC7, Subcommittee on Biodiesel in Railroad Applications.
HISTORICAL
1976-08-01
Standard
J312C_197608
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1971-09-01
Standard
J312B_197109
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1993-01-01
Standard
J312_199301
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significant of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1988-10-01
Standard
J312_198810
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1987-05-01
Standard
J312_198705
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1986-05-01
Standard
J312_198605
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1985-06-01
Standard
J312_198506
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1982-06-01
Standard
J312_198206
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1980-06-01
Standard
J312_198006
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1978-05-01
Standard
J312D_197805
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
2001-02-01
Standard
J312_200102
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1997-05-01
Standard
J312_199705
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
CURRENT
2010-11-05
Standard
J312_201011
This SAE Recommended Practice summarizes the composition of modern automotive gasolines, the significance of their physical and chemical characteristics, and the pertinent test methods for defining or evaluating these properties.
HISTORICAL
1994-02-01
Standard
J1616_199402
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a practical automotive fuel, with advantages and disadvantages when compared to gasoline. It has a good octane quality, is clean burning, easy to meter, and generally produces lower vehicle exhaust emissions. CNG is used to fuel internal combustion engines. Natural gas is normally compressed form 20 690 to 24 820 kPa (3000 to 3600 psig) to increase its energy density thereby reducing its on-board vehicle storage volume for a given range and payload. The properties of natural gas are influenced by (1) the processing of natural gas by the production and transmission companies and (2) the regional gas supply, storage, and demand balancing done by distribution companies often in concert with pipeline companies to maintain uninterrupted service throughout the year, e.g., peakshaving with propane-air (see U.S. Bureau of Mines Publication 503).
HISTORICAL
2016-05-12
Standard
J1616_201605
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a practical automotive fuel, with advantages and disadvantages when compared to gasoline. Large quantities of natural gas are available in North America. It has a higher octane number rating, produces low exhaust emissions, no evaporative emissions and can cost less on an equivalent energy basis than other fuels. Natural gas is normally compressed from 20 684 to 24 821 kPa (3000 to 3600 psig) to increase its energy density thereby reducing its on-board vehicle storage volume for a given range and payload. CNG can also be made from liquefied natural gas by elevating its pressure and vaporizing it to a gas. Once converted it is referred to LCNG.
CURRENT
2017-03-06
Standard
J1616_201703
Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) is a practical automotive fuel, with advantages and disadvantages when compared to gasoline. Large quantities of natural gas are available in North America. It has a higher octane number rating, produces low exhaust emissions, no evaporative emissions and can cost less on an equivalent energy basis than other fuels. Natural gas is normally compressed from 20 684 to 24 821 kPa (3000 to 3600 psig) to increase its energy density thereby reducing its on-board vehicle storage volume for a given range and payload. CNG can also be made from liquefied natural gas by elevating its pressure and vaporizing it to a gas. Once converted it is referred to LCNG.
HISTORICAL
1984-05-01
Standard
J1297_198405
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1985-06-01
Standard
J1297_198506
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1980-04-01
Standard
J1297_198004
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1982-04-01
Standard
J1297_198204
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1990-06-01
Standard
J1297_199006
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
2000-10-01
Standard
J1297_200010
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
HISTORICAL
1987-05-01
Standard
J1297_198705
This SAE Information Report provides information on certain fuels that are being used or have been suggested as alternatives to motor gasoline (SAE J312) or automotive diesel fuel (SAE J313) for use in spark-ignition or compression-ignition engines. Some of these fuels are derived from petroleum while others are from non petroleum sources.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 55