Criteria

Text:
Sector:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 7713
2010-10-25
Technical Paper
2010-01-2214
Xianjing Li, Liguang Li, Yongzheng Sun, Zongjie Hu, Jun Deng
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) provide significantly improvement in fuel economy over conventional vehicles as well as reductions in greenhouse gas and petroleum. Numerous recent reports regarding control strategy, power train configuration, driving pattern, all electric range (AER) and their effects on fuel consumption and electric energy consumption of PHEVs are reported. Meanwhile, the control strategy for engine start-stop and mileage between recharging events from the electricity grid also has an important influence on the petroleum displacement potential of PHEVs, but few reports are published. In this paper, a detailed simulation model is set up for a plug-in series hybrid electric vehicle (PSHEV) employing the AVL CRUISE. The model was employed to predict the AER of the baseline PSHEV using rule-based logical threshold switching control strategy.
2010-10-19
Technical Paper
2010-01-2335
Jeffrey D. Rupp, Anthony G. King
Successful demonstrations of fully autonomous vehicle operation in controlled situations are leading to increased research investment and activity. This has already resulted in significant advancements in the underlying technologies necessary to make it a practical reality someday. Not only are these idealized events sparking imaginations with the potential benefits for safety, convenience, fuel economy and emissions, they also embolden some to make somewhat surprising and sometimes astonishing projections for their appearance on public roads in the near future. Are we now ready for a giant leap forward to the self-driving car with all its complexity and inter-dependencies? Humans will need to grow with and adapt to the technological advancements of the machine and we'll deeply challenge our social and political paradigms before we're done. Even if we as engineers are ready, is the driving public ready?
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0269
Adam Bryant, Joseph Beno, Damon Weeks
Battlefield reconnaissance is an integral part of today's integrated battlefield management system. Current reconnaissance technology typically requires land based vehicle systems to observe while stationary or, at best, significantly limits travel speeds while collecting data. By combining current Canadian Light Armored Vehicle based reconnaissance systems with the Center for Electromechanics (CEM) electronically controlled active Electromechanical Suspension System (EMS), opportunities exist to substantially increase cross-country speeds at which useful reconnaissance data may be collected. This report documents a study performed by The University of Texas Center for Electromechanics with funding from L3-ES to use existing modeling and simulation tools to explore potential benefits provided by EMS for reconnaissance on the move.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0334
Jim Cowart, Matthew Carr, Pat Caton, Lars Stoulig, Dianne Luning-Prak, Andrew Moore, Leonard Hamilton
Synthetic diesel fuels from Fischer-Tropsch or hydrotreating processes have high cetane numbers with respect to conventional diesel fuel. This study investigates diesel combustion characteristics with these high cetane fuels. A military jet fuel (JP-5 specification), a Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthetic diesel, and normal hexadecane (C16), a pure component fuel with defined cetane number of 100, are compared with operation of conventional military diesel fuel (F-76 specification). The fuels are tested in a AM General GEP HMMWV engine, an indirect-injection, largely mechanically-controlled diesel engine. Hundreds of thousands of these are in current use and are projected to be in service for many years to come. Experimental testing showed that satisfactory operation could be achieved across the speed-load operating map even for the highest cetane fuel (normal hexadecane). The JP-5, FT, and C16 fuels all showed later injection timing.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0258
Yang Yang, William Liou, James Sheng, David Gorsich, Sudhakar Arepally
Ground vehicle subjecting to a blast can sustain vehicle damages and occupant injuries. Direct blast thermal and force loadings compromise vehicle structural integrity and cause damages. Computer simulations of vehicle blast wave damages can be obtained by solving the gas dynamics of the blast wave and the structural dynamics of the vehicle, through a projection of the wave's impact on the vehicle structure. There are various possible ways that the blast can cause injuries to the vehicle occupants, such as direct collision with objects instantly accelerated by the blast pressure and impact by the secondary shock waves transmitted through the platform structure. This paper describes a parallel computer simulation methodology that can potentially be applied to predict the structure damage and the associated occupant kinematics during a blast event by solving the multi-physics problem of fluid dynamics, solid dynamics, and multi-body dynamics.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0266
J.Y. Wong
With growing globalization of the economy, to gain a competitive edge in world markets shortening the product development cycle is crucial. Virtual product development is, therefore, being actively pursued in the off-road vehicle industry. To implement this process successfully, the development of comprehensive and realistic computer-aided methods for performance and design evaluation of off-road vehicles is of vital importance. To be useful to the engineer in industry for the development and design of new products, the computer-aided methods should take into account all major vehicle design parameters and pertinent terrain characteristics. They should be based on the understanding of the physical nature and the mechanics of vehicle-terrain interaction. Their capabilities should be substantiated by test data.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0437
Mina M.S. Kaldas, Roman Henze, Ferit Küçükay
Due to the importance of the fast transportation under every circumstance, the transportation process may require a high speed heavy vehicle from time to time, which may turn the transportation process more unsafe. Due to that fact the truck safety during braking and the ride comfort during long distance travelling with high speeds should be improved. Therefore, the aim of this work is to develop a control system which combines the suspension and braking systems. The control system consists of three controllers; the first one for the active suspension system of the truck body and cab, the second one for the ABS and, the third for the integrated control system between the active suspension system and the ABS. The control strategy is also separated into two strategies.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0399
Andre Ferrarese, Jason Bieneman, David J. Domanchuk, Thomas Smith, Thomas Stong, Peter Einberger
Changing emission legislation limits are challenging the engine developers in many aspects. Requirement to improve combustion and engine efficiency have resulted in increased loads and higher levels of abrasive particles within the engine environment. Concerning piston rings and piston ring grooves, such engine modifications are leading to critical tribological conditions and side wear is becoming a key issue in the design of these components. Historically one of the most common forms of side wear protection on piston rings has been chromium plate. This solution has limitations on durability (low thickness) and on topography (rough surfaces). In response to these limitations, nitrided stainless steel top rings have been used to improve the side protection; it is harder and typically has a smoother surface finish when compared to chromium coating.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0657
Bashar AbdulNour, Mark Doroudian, Mohsen Battoei-Avarzaman
The performance of ground vehicles of all types is influenced by the cooling and ventilation of the engine compartment. An increased heat load into the engine compartment occurs after engine shut down. Heat is transferred from the hot components within the engine compartment by natural convection to the surrounding air and by radiation to the adjacent surfaces. The heat is then dissipated to the ambient mostly by convection from the exterior surfaces. The objective of this study is to develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation methodology to predict the airflow velocity and temperature distributions within the engine compartment, as well as the surface temperature of critical engine components during the after-boil condition. This study was conducted using a full-scale, simplified engine compartment of an armored combat vehicle. Steady-state simulation was performed first to predict the condition prior to engine shut down.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0656
Jason A. Lustbader, John P. Rugh, Brianna R. Rister, Travis S. Venson
In the United States, intercity long-haul trucks idle approximately 1,800 hrs per year primarily for sleeper cab hotel loads, consuming 838 million gallons of diesel fuel [1]. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working on solutions to this challenge through the CoolCab project. The objective of the CoolCab project is to work closely with industry to design efficient thermal management systems for long-haul trucks that keep the cab comfortable with minimized engine idling. Truck engine idling is primarily done to heat or cool the cab/sleeper, keep the fuel warm in cold weather, and keep the engine warm for cold temperature startup. Reducing the thermal load on the cab/sleeper will decrease air conditioning system requirements, improve efficiency, and help reduce fuel use. To help assess and improve idle reduction solutions, the CoolCalc software tool was developed.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-1089
Woosuk Sung, Yo-In Song, Ki-Ho Yu, Tae-Won Lim
Wide attention to fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) comes from two huge issues currently the world is facing with: the concern of the petroleum reserves depletion due to consequent oil dependence and the earth global warming due in some extent to vehicle emissions. In this background, Hyundai, along with its sister company Kia, has been building the FCEVs and operating their test fleet with several tens of units at home and abroad. Since 2004, 32 passenger vehicles have been offered for the Department of Energy's controlled hydrogen fleet and infrastructure demonstration and validation project in the U.S. In the meantime, from 2006, 30 passenger vehicles as well as four buses, featuring the in-house developed fuel cell stack and its associated components, are currently under the domestic operation for the FCEV learning demonstration led by the Ministry of Knowledge and Economy.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-0637
Omar Khemoudj, Hocine Imine, Mohamed Djemai
In this paper, we are interested in developing a robust tire-force estimator for heavy duty vehicles. We use a combined model of the articulated vehicle: a yaw plane model for the chassis motion and a vertical plane model for the axles. In the proposed method, we make use of the on-board available sensors to which low-cost sensors are added. In order to optimize the sensors configuration, a robust exact differentiator is used in order to obtain accelerations from the measured velocities. Once the differentiation is obtained, the model is inverted to determine the unknown input forces. The approach is validated by comparing the estimation results to those given by the software simulator prosper .
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0720
Kusnadi Liem, Michael Peperhowe, Hagen Haupt
Hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation in the development and test process of vehicle dynamics controllers requires a real-time tractor-trailer simulation model. The hitch coupling must be numerically stable to ensure real-time simulation for various driving maneuvers, particularly at the vehicle's handling limits. This paper presents a robust implementation of tractor-trailer coupling. The equation of motion is formed using a novel formulation which is a combination of Jourdain's Principle and the Articulated Body Algorithm. The paper shows that a robust model for a real-time tractor-trailer simulation can be achieved with the proposed method. Moreover, the approach presented is suitable for modular modeling, is successfully implemented and can also be used as a basis for flexible system definition with an adjustable number of trailer axles.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0240
Saurav Talukdar, Salil Kulkarni
The planar rigid bicycle model is one of the most popular models used in vehicle dynamics. It has widely been used in studying vehicle handling characteristics and designing steering control system for vehicles. This paper analyses a modified dynamic model called the "Elastic Bicycle Model." This model improves upon the classical bicycle model by taking into account the flexibility of the vehicle frame by using concepts from the Euler beam theory. Complete set of the resulting dynamic equations of this model are presented. Non-dimensional versions of the equations are used to investigate the steady state response of the model. Finally, the results of the response study obtained by modeling a small truck with an elastic model and the classical bicycle model are presented. These include the steady state solutions as function of different parameters as well as a transient solution in response to a saw-tooth steering input and a step input. Octave® has been used for simulation purpose.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0183
Brad Hopkins, Saied Taheri
Models for off-road vehicles, such as farm equipment and military vehicles, require an off-road tire model in order to properly understand their dynamic behavior on off-road driving surfaces. Extensive literature can be found for on-road tire modeling, but not much can be found for off-road tire modeling. This paper presents an off-road tire model that was developed for use in vehicle handling studies. An on-road, dry asphalt tire model was first developed by performing rolling road force and moment testing. Off-road testing was then performed on dirt and gravel driving surfaces to develop scaling factors that explain how the lateral force behavior of the tire will scale from an on-road to an off-road situation. The tire models were used in vehicle simulation software to simulate vehicle behavior on various driving surfaces. The simulated vehicle response was compared to actual maximum speed before sliding vs. turning radius data for the studied vehicle to assess the tire model.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0174
Lisa Larsson, Torbjörn Wiklund, Lennart Löfdahl
The aim of the study was to investigate the cooling performance of two cooling package positions for distribution vehicles by using Computational Fluid Dynamics. The first cooling package was positioned in the front of the vehicle, behind the grill and the second position was at the rear of the vehicle. Each case was evaluated by its cooling performance for a critical driving situation and its aerodynamic drag at 90 km/h, where the largest challenge of an alternative position is the cooling air availability. The geometry used was a semi-generic commercial vehicle, based on a medium size distribution truck with a heat rejection value set to a fixed typical level at maximum power for a 13 litre Euro 6 diesel engine. The heat exchangers included in the study were the air conditioning condenser, the charge air cooler and the radiator. It was found that the main problem with the rear mounted cooling installation was the combination of the fan and the geometry after the fan.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0148
Hany Ali Sherif, Reda Elkhodary, Amro Roshdy
The aim of this paper is to present two widely used techniques in gearbox diagnostics through implementation of these techniques on a heavy duty truck with two types of local faults, broken teeth and defected bearing. The first technique presented in this study is the stationary STSF (Spatial Transformation of Sound Field) which is based on the measured acoustic signal captured in the nearfield of the operating gearbox. The second technique is the Vibroacoustic technique which is based on the vibration signal picked up on the gearbox surface. The results from acoustic signals were compared with vibration signals. In contrast to Vibroacoustic technique, unless special methods and particular arrangement are used to reconstruct the acoustic field, STSF may suffer from some difficulty and limitations. Also, background noise or any acquisition errors may result in an erroneous reconstruction of the acoustic quantities.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0162
Ming Jiang, Huaizhu Wu, Kebing Tang, Minsuk Kim, Sivapalan Senthooran, Heinz Friz, Yingzhe Zhang
The engineering process in the development of commercial vehicles is facing more and more stringent emission regulations while at the same time the market demands for better performance but with lower fuel consumption. The optimization of aerodynamic performance for reduced drag is a key element for achieving related performance targets. Closely related to aerodynamics are wind noise and cabin soiling and both of them are becoming more and more important as a quality criterion in many markets. This paper describes the aerodynamic and aero-acoustic performance evaluation of a Dongfeng heavy truck using digital simulation based on a LBM approach. It includes a study for improving drag within the design of a facelift of the truck. A soiling analysis is performed for each aerodynamic result by calculating the accumulation of particles emitted form the wheels on the cabin. One of the challenges in the development process of trucks is that different cabin types have to be designed.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0163
Robert Lietz, Burkhard Hupertz, Neil Lewington, Rafael Silveira, Christian Taucher
A benchmark study was conducted to assess the capability of an open source CFD based process to accurately simulate the physics of the flow field around various vehicle types. The ICON FOAMpro process was used to simulate the flow field of four baseline geometries of a Truck, CD-Car, B-Car and an SUV. Further studies were carried out to assess the effects of geometry variations on the predicted aerodynamic lift and drag. A Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) approach was chosen for the benchmarks. In addition to aerodynamic lift and drag values, the results for surface pressure data, surface and wake flow fields were calculated. These results were compared with values obtained using Ford's existing CFD processes.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0090
Wei Liu, Wenku Shi Sr
In this paper, a Magneto-Rheological (MR) fluid semi-active suspension system was tested on a commercial vehicle, a domestic light bus, to determine the performance improvements compared to passive suspensions. MR fluid is a material that responds to an applied magnetic field with a significant change in its rheological behavior. When the magnetic field is applied, the properties of such a fluid can change from a free-flowing, low viscosity fluid to a near solid, and this change in properties takes place in a few milliseconds and is fully reversible. A quarter suspension test rig was built out to test the nonlinear performance of MR damper. Based on a large number of experimental data, a phenomenological model of MR damper based on the Bouc-Wen hysteresis model was adopted to predict both the force-displacement behavior and the complex nonlinear force-velocity response.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0122
Gary L. Hunter
Modern heavy duty Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) diesel engines represent the state of the art in engine performance and design features, control architecture, and the use of light weight high strength materials. These engines, with appropriate adaptation for operation on military fuels, make excellent choices for defense applications. This paper reviews the selection and modification of a COTS engine suitable for potential defense applications. Considerations for robust operation of the engine on JP8, engine system modifications appropriate for military vehicle emission requirements, reduction of engine system heat rejection, and optimization of engine efficiency will be discussed using example data from converting a 2011 model year COTS engine for defense applications. This work was funded by the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) from Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) Topic 15, awarded in 2009.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0123
Peter Schihl, Laura decker-hoogterp, Kayla pence, Karen leonard
Current U.S. Army ground vehicles predominately use commercial off-the-shelf or modified commercial diesel engines as the prime mover. Unique military engines are typically utilized when commercial products do not meet the mobility requirements of the particular ground vehicle in question. In either case, such engines traditionally have been calibrated using North American diesel fuel (DF-2) and Jet Propellant 8 (JP-8) compatibility wasn't given much consideration since any associated power loss due to the lower volumetric energy density was not an issue for most applications at then targeted climatic conditions. Furthermore, since the genesis of the ‘one fuel forward policy’ of using JP-8 as the single battlefield fuel there has been limited experience to truly assess fuel effects on diesel engine combustion systems until this decade.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0067
Nikolai Moshchuk, Yunjun Li, Steve Opiteck
An air suspension system can consist of many different components. These components include an air compressor, air springs, pneumatic solenoid valves, height sensors, electronic control unit, air reservoir, air lines, pressure sensor, temperature sensor, etc. The system could be designed as a 2-corner rear air suspension or a 4-corner air suspension. In this paper, the pneumatic models of air suspension systems are presented. The suspension system models are implemented in AmeSim. The suspension controls are implemented using Matlab/Simulink. The compressor was modeled using the standard AmeSim element with known mass flow rate as a function of pressure ratio. Air lines were modeled using a friction submodel of pneumatic pipe and control (isolation) valves are modeled using 2 position, 2 port pneumatic servo valves. The air spring is modeled as a single pneumatic chamber, single rod jack with spring assistance to account for spring nonlinearities.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0645
Devadatta Mukutmoni, Ales Alajbegovic, Jaehoon Han
Many critical thermal issues that occur in vehicles are uncovered only under more “thermally stressed” driving conditions that are transient in nature such as abruptly changing vehicle speed or turning off fan and engine. Therefore, for flow simulations to be useful in the vehicle design process, it is imperative that these simulations have the ability to accurately model long term transient thermal convection on full vehicles. Presented are simulations for a passenger vehicle driving at 60 kilometers per hour followed by a complete stop. The simulations were performed using a coupling between the flow and thermal solver and in the process, taking into account convection, conduction and radiation effects. Temperature predictions were made both under steady state conditions and during the key-off. Good agreement with the measurements was observed.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0651
Joshua Pryor, Matt Pierce, Eric Fremond, Yanick Michou
This paper presents the efforts done by Volvo 3P, through a partnership with ThermoAnalytics Inc, to develop transient thermal simulation methodologies of the under hood of a truck. The verification process for the hot spots analysis currently in use at Volvo 3P is described and the key transient situations for the hot spots analysis are identified: hot shutdown, DPF regeneration and long drive cycle, are currently only covered by physical testing late in the project, contrary to steady-state operating conditions that are already managed through simulations in the early stage of the development phase. The goal of this work is to develop simulation methodologies for these transient situations which are likely to increase the efficiency of the verification process. The key issues to be satisfied are to minimize the model development and the simulation times while achieving an acceptable accuracy level.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0697
Hui Xie, Richard Stobart, Per Tunestal, Lars Eriksson, Yiqun Huang, Patrick Leteinturier
The aim of this paper is to compile the state of the art of engine control and develop scenarios for improvements in a number of applications of engine control where the pace of technology change is at its most marked. The first application is control of downsized engines with enhancement of combustion using direct injection, variable valve actuation and turbo charging. The second application is electrification of the powertrain with its impact on engine control. Various architectures are explored such as micro, mild, full hybrid and range extenders. The third application is exhaust gas after-treatment, with a focus on the trade-off between engine and after-treatment control. The fourth application is implementation of powertrain control systems, hardware, software, methods, and tools. The paper summarizes several examples where the performance depends on the availability of control systems for automotive applications.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0510
Megumu Oshima, Kanya Nara, Tatsuhiko Yoshimura
We have constructed a design review system in which Full Process and Quick Design Review processes are selectively used according to the degree of newness in a design change. The Full Process Design Review is conducted for a review of system or part designs having a high level of newness and the tools and process used in this review were standardized. The Quick Design Review is newly developed design review process that could be conducted in a quicker and simpler manner for designs involving a medium level of newness in order to effectively prevent design-related problems. The Quick Design Review uses a changes list and Design Review Based on Failure Mode (DRBFM) [1] worksheets to focus on the changed points. This method enables the engineers involved to identify problems and to devise solutions efficiently and effectively through discussions.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0516
Makarand Datar, Ilinca Stanciulescu, Dan Negrut
The paper describes a methodology to co-simulate, with high fidelity, simultaneously and in one computational framework, all of the main vehicle subsystems for improved engineering design. The co-simulation based approach integrates in MATLAB/Simulink a physics-based tire model with high fidelity vehicle dynamics model and an accurate powertrain model allowing insights into 1) how the dynamics of a vehicle affect fuel consumption, quality of emission and vehicle control strategies and 2) how the choice of powertrain systems influence the dynamics of the vehicle; for instance how the variations in drive shaft torque affects vehicle handling, the maximum achievable acceleration of the vehicle, etc. The goal of developing this co-simulation framework is to capture the interaction between powertrain and rest of the vehicle in order to better predict, through simulation, the overall dynamics of the vehicle.
2010-04-12
Journal Article
2010-01-1266
David Smith, Henning Lohse-Busch, David Irick
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) technologies have the potential for considerable petroleum consumption reductions, possibly at the expense of increased tailpipe emissions due to multiple “cold” start events and improper use of the engine for PHEV specific operation. PHEVs operate predominantly as electric vehicles (EVs) with intermittent assist from the engine during high power demands. As a consequence, the engine can be subjected to multiple cold start events. These cold start events may have a significant impact on the tailpipe emissions due to degraded catalyst performance and starting the engine under less than ideal conditions. On current hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), the first cold start of the engine dictates whether or not the vehicle will pass federal emissions tests. PHEV operation compounds this problem due to infrequent, multiple engine cold starts.
2010-04-12
Technical Paper
2010-01-0784
Johann C. Wurzenberger, Peter Bartsch, Tomaz Katrasnik
The present work introduces a fully integrated real-time (RT) capable engine and vehicle model. The gas path and drive line are described in the time domain of seconds whereas the reciprocating characteristics of an IC engine are reflected by a crank angle resolved cylinder model. The RT engine model is derived from a high fidelity 1D cycle simulation and gas exchange model to support an efficient and consistent transfer of model data like geometries, heat transfer or combustion. The workflow of model calibration and application is outlined and base ECU functionalities for boost pressure, EGR, smoke and idle speed control are applied for transient engine operation. Steady state results of the RT engine model are compared to experimental data and 1D high fidelity simulations for 19 different engine load points. In addition an NEDC (New European Drive Cycle) is simulated and results are evaluated with data from chassis dynamometer measurements.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 7713

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: