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Viewing 1 to 14 of 14
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3567
Lawrence J. Dalimonte, Adam Kotrba, Keith Olivier, Ruth Latham
A unique validation method is proposed for mount designs of Lean NOx Traps (LNT's), in which characteristic curves of failure points as functions of thermal cycles and vibration amplitudes are generated. LNT's are one of the several new types of emissions control devices applied to Diesel Exhaust Systems, and they reduce the amount of NOx through chemical adsorption. Desulfation must occur nearly every hour, which involves raising the inlet gas temperature of the LNT to around 700°C to “burn off” sulfur from the catalyst, which otherwise would decrease its catalytic activity. This temperature is held for several minutes, and its cyclic occurrence has a negative effect on the long-term performance of the support mat, a major component of its mount design. As substrate temperatures increase, shell temperatures do as well, and thermal growth differences between the ceramic substrate and metallic shell cause the gap between them, which is filled by the support mat, to increase.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3472
Ruth Latham, Peter Rückel, Keith Olivier, Argun Yetkin, Adam Kotrba
In order to scientifically approach the design of mounting systems for substrates in emissions control systems, it is essential to characterize the behavior of the involved materials, particularly the support mat. Manufacturing processes and various in-field conditions impact the long term performance of the support mat, and life-long emissions performance is critically dependent on its ability to retain the substrate throughout the intended life. Therefore, to ensure product robustness, the behavior during operation of all available support mats must be appropriately characterized to determine the technical layout in specific applications. This paper addresses three common characterization tests, developed internally and externally. Additionally, equipment improvements to minimize artifacts in test results as well as the development of a new mat test for manufacturing methods are addressed.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3471
Scott Martin, Joachim Gehrlein, Adam Kotrba, Figen Lacin
As Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) NOx abatement systems gain commercial acceptance and popularity, the need for efficiency predictive capabilities increases. To this end, a flow bench was developed capable of varying steady state inputs (temperature, flow rate and NOx concentration). The efficiencies of various SCR systems was measured and compared. This concept of a steady state flow bench approach allows for an efficient and cost effective means to evaluate comparable system designs.
2013-09-24
Journal Article
2013-01-2465
Adam Kotrba, Alan Brockman, Scott Martin, Alan Mikovits, Gary L. Butzke, Zack Richey, Matthew Leudeke
Catalysts and filters continue to be applied widely to meet particulate matter regulations across new and retrofit diesel engines. Soot management of the filter continues to be enhanced, including regeneration methodologies. Concerns regarding in-cylinder post-injection of fuel for active regeneration increases interests in directly injecting this fuel into the exhaust. Performance of secondary fuel injection layouts is discussed, and sensitivities on thermal uniformity are measured and analyzed, providing insight to packaging challenges and methods to characterize and improve application designs. Influences of end cone geometries, mixers, and injector mounting positions are quantified via thermal distribution at each substrate's outlet. A flow laboratory is applied for steady state characterization, repeated on an engine dynamometer, which also provides transient results across the NRTC.
2012-09-24
Technical Paper
2012-01-1960
Guanyu Zheng, Adam Kotrba, Michael Golin, Timothy Gardner, Andy Wang
The introduction of stringent EPA 2015 regulations for locomotive / marine engines and IMO 2016 Tier III marine engines initiates the need to develop large diesel engine aftertreatment systems to drastically reduce emissions such as SOx, PM, NOx, unburned HC and CO. In essence, the aftertreatment systems must satisfy a comprehensive set of performance criteria with respect to back pressure, emission reduction efficiency, mixing, urea deposits, packaging, durability, cost and others. Given multiple development objectives, a systematic approach must be adopted with top-down structure that addresses top-level technical directions, mid-level subsystem layouts, and bottom-level component designs and implementations. This paper sets the objective to provide an overview of system development philosophy, and at the same time touch specific development scenarios as illustrations.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2200
Adam Kotrba, Ling Bai, Argun Yetkin, Robert Shotwell, Timothy Gardner
Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) have been successfully applied for several years to reduce Particulate Matter (PM) emissions from on-highway applications, and similar products are now also applied in off-highway markets and retrofit solutions. Most solutions are catalytically-based, necessitating minimum operating temperatures and demanding engine support strategies to reduce risks [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]. An ignition-based thermal combustion device is applied with Cordierite and SiC filters, evaluating various DPF conditions, including effects of soot load, exhaust flow rates, catalytic coatings, and regeneration temperatures. System designs are described, including flow and temperature uniformity, as well as soot load distribution and thermal gradient response.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2204
Guanyu Zheng, Timothy Gardner, Adam Kotrba, Michael Golin, Paul Majewski
EPA 2015 Tier IV emission requirements pose significant challenges to large diesel engine after treatment system development with respect to reducing exhaust emissions including HC, CO, NOx and Particulate Matter (PM). For a typical locomotive, marine or stationary generator engine with 8 to 20 cylinders and 2500 to 4500 BHP, the PM reduction target could be over 90% and NOx reduction target over 75% for a wide range of running conditions. Generally, HC, CO and PM reductions can be achieved by combining DOC, cDPF and active regeneration systems. NOx reduction can be achieved by injecting urea as an active reagent into the exhaust stream to allow NOx to react with ammonia per SCR catalysts, as the mainstream approach for on-highway truck applications.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2207
Figen Lacin, Adam Kotrba, Granville Hayworth, Henry Sullivan, Marek Tatur, Jason Jacques, Dean Tomazic, Hoon Cho
Stringent global emissions legislation demands effective NOx reduction strategies, particularly for the aftertreatment, and current typical liquid urea SCR systems achieve efficiencies greater than 90% [1]. However, with such high-performing systems comes the trade-off of requiring a tank of reductant (urea water solution) to be filled regularly, usually as soon as the fuel fillings or as far as oil changes. Advantages of solid reductants, particularly ammonium carbamate, include greater ammonia densities, enabling the reductant refill interval to be extended several multiples versus a given reductant volume of urea, or diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) [2]. An additional advantage is direct gaseous ammonia dosing, enabling reductant injection at lower exhaust temperatures to widen its operational coverage achieving greater emissions reduction potential [3], as well as eliminating deposits, reducing mixing lengths, and avoiding freeze/thaw risks and investments.
2012-09-24
Technical Paper
2012-01-1957
Bradley Gough, Adam Kotrba, Gabriel Salanta, Jeremy Popovich, Travis Anderson, Jason Reed, Yinyan Huang
As emissions regulations around the world become more stringent, emerging markets are seeking alternative strategies that align with local infrastructures and conditions. A Lean NOx Catalyst (LNC) is developed that achieves up to 60% NOx reduction with ULSD as its reductant and ≻95% with ethanol-based fuel reductants. Opportunities exist in countries that already have an ethanol-based fuel infrastructure, such as Brazil, improving emissions reduction penetration rates without costs and complexities of establishing urea infrastructures. The LNC performance competes with urea SCR NOx reduction, catalyst volume, reductant consumption, and cost, plus it is proven to be durable, passing stationary test cycles and adequately recovering from sulfur poisoning. Controls are developed and applied on a 7.2L engine, an inline 6-cylinder non-EGR turbo diesel.
2012-09-24
Journal Article
2012-01-1961
Guanyu Zheng, Dana Kregling, Adam Kotrba, Alan Brockman, Michael Golin
EPA 2015 Tier IV emission requirements pose significant challenges to large diesel engine aftertreatment system (EAS) development aimed at reducing exhaust emissions such as NOx and PM. An EAS has three primary subsystems, Aftertreatment hardware, controls and fluid delivery. Fluid delivery is the subsystem which supplies urea into exhaust stream to allow SCR catalytic reaction and/or periodic DOC diesel dosing to elevate exhaust temperatures for diesel particulate filter (DPF) soot regeneration. The purpose of this paper is to discuss various aspects of fluid delivery system development from flow and pressure perspective. It starts by giving an overview of the system requirements and outlining theoretical background; then discusses overall design considerations, injector and pump selection criteria, and three main injector layouts. Steady state system performance was studied for manifold layout.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-1074
Guanyu Zheng, Manoj Kumar Sampath, William Alcini, Gabriel Salanta, Adam Kotrba, Bryan Axe
To meet the 2010 diesel engine emission regulations, an aftertreatment system was developed to reduce HC, CO, NOx and soot. In NOx reduction, a baseline SCR module was designed to include urea injector, mixing decomposition tube and SCR catalysts. However, it was found that the baseline decomposition tube had unacceptable urea mixing performance and severe deposit issues largely because of poor hardware design. The purpose of this article is to describe necessary development work to improve the baseline system to achieve desired mixing targets. To this end, an emissions Flow Lab and computational fluid dynamics were used as the main tools to evaluate urea mixing solutions. Given the complicated urea spray transport and limited packaging space, intensive efforts were taken to develop pre-injector pipe geometry, post-injector cone geometry, single mixer design modifications, and dual mixer design options.
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2199
Manoj Kumar Sampath, Guanyu Zheng, Yanping Zhang, Adam Kotrba, Michael Golin, Figen Lacin
To meet EPA Tier IV large diesel engine emission targets, intensive development efforts are necessary to achieve NOx reduction and Particulate Matter (PM) reduction targets [1]. With respect to NOx reduction, liquid urea is typically used as the reagent to react with NOx via SCR catalyst [2]. Regarding to PM reduction, additional heat is required to raise exhaust temperature to reach DPF active / passive regeneration performance window [3]. Typically the heat can be generated by external diesel burners which allow diesel liquid droplets to react directly with oxygen in the exhaust gas [4]. Alternatively the heat can be generated by catalytic burners which enable diesel vapor to react with oxygen via DOC catalyst mostly through surface reactions [5].
2011-09-13
Technical Paper
2011-01-2203
Gabriel Salanta, Adam Kotrba, John Nunan, Jason Jacques, Dan Hancu, Benjamin Winkler, Daniel Norton, Larry Lewis, Ashish Mhadeshwar
Stringent global emissions legislations demand effective NOx reduction strategies for both the engine as well as the aftertreatment. Diesel applications have previously applied Lean NOx Catalysts (LNCs) [1, 2], but their reduction efficiency and longevity have been far less than that of the competing ammonia-based SCR systems, such as urea [3]. A catalyst has been developed to significantly reduce NOx emissions, approaching 60% with ULSD and exceeding 95% with E85. Both thermal and sulfur aging are applied, as well as on-engine aging, illustrating resilient performance to accommodate necessary life requirements. A robust system is developed to introduce both ULSD from the vehicle's tank as well as E85 (up to 85% ethanol with the balance being gasoline) from a moderately sized supplemental tank, enabling extended mileage service intervals to replenish the reductant, as compared with urea, particularly when coupled with an engine-out based NOx reduction technology, such as EGR.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0153
Dipankar Sahoo, Adam Kotrba, Tom Steiner, Greg Swift
Abstract Nearly a third of the fuel energy is wasted through the exhaust of a vehicle. An efficient waste heat recovery process will undoubtedly lead to improved fuel efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Currently, there are multiple waste heat recovery technologies that are being investigated in the auto industry. One innovative waste heat recovery approach uses Thermoacoustic Converter (TAC) technology. Thermoacoustics is the field of physics related to the interaction of acoustic waves (sonic power) with heat flows. As in a heat engine, the TAC produces electric power where a temperature differential exists, which can be generated with engine exhaust (hot side) and coolant (cold side). Essentially, the TAC converts exhaust waste heat into electricity in two steps: 1) the exhaust waste heat is converted to acoustic energy (mechanical) and 2) the acoustic energy is converted to electrical energy.
Viewing 1 to 14 of 14

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