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Viewing 1 to 12 of 12
1999-11-15
Technical Paper
1999-01-3781
Ragnar Ledesma, Shan Shih
The uniqueness and challenge of heavy and medium duty vehicle manufacturing is that the vehicle&s subsystems and major components are procured from different suppliers. As a consequence, engineering task coordination for total vehicle performance optimization is required even if the intended design modification is only on one component. In the case of suspension design, related subsystems such as the drive axle, driveline, brake system, steering system, and engine mounts should all be included for review. The related potential problems for study fall into three categories, namely: function, durability, and NVH. The effective approach in addressing all these issues early in the design stage is through computer modeling and dynamic system simulation of the suspension system and related subsystems.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3576
Yenkai (Brian) Wang, Shan Shih
Welding has been used extensively in automotive components design due to its flexibility to be applied in manufacturing, high structural strength and low cost. To improve fuel economy and reduce material cost, weight reduction by optimized structural design has been a high priority in auto industry. In the majority of heavy duty vehicle's chassis components design, the ability to predict the mechanical performance of welded joints is the key to success of structural optimization. FEA (finite element analysis) has been used in the industry to analyze welded parts. However, mesh sensitivity and material properties have been major issues due to geometry irregularity, metallurgical degradation of the base material, and inherent residual stress associated with welded joints. An approach, equilibrium-equivalent structural stress method, led by Battelle and through several joint industrial projects (JIP), has been developed.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3573
Jia Li, Shan Shih
To validate the integrity of a commercial vehicle's exhaust system's structural design is a challenging job. An integrated approach to use both simulation/modeling and hardware testing must be employed to reduce product development cost. In addition to the considerations of the geometry and configuration specs of 70-90 parts and joints as well as material's thermal and mechanical property data in model development, representative loading must be used. For base excitation type of loading, such as the one experienced by the vehicle's exhaust system, one must decide whether to conduct the time domain transient analysis or frequency domain random vibration analysis. Although both methods are well known, few discussions can be found in the literature regarding their effective use in the framework of product design and development. Based on our study, the random vibration method should be used first for identifying high stress locations in the system and for design optimization.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3546
Wangquan (Winston) Cheng, Scott Kuan, Shan Shih
This paper describes an analytical process for the design of a brake shoe assembly that consists of the linings, shoe table, webs, and rivets. One fundamental performance requirement for the brake shoe assembly is that the linings will not lose clamp force within the desired service life. Key elements of the analytical process involved developing an FEA model with given loading conditions and developing a mathematical model to study the influence parameters of the forces acting on the lining.
2005-11-01
Technical Paper
2005-01-3565
Ragnar Ledesma, Leonard Jenaway, Yenkai Wang, Shan Shih
In this paper, we describe the development of multi-axis, accelerated durability tests for commercial vehicle suspension systems. The objective of the exercise is to design accelerated durability tests that have well-defined correlation with customer usage. The procedure starts with a definition of the vehicle's duty cycle based on the expected operational parameters, namely: road profile, vehicle speed, and warranty life. The second step is determining the durability proving ground test schedule such that the accumulated pseudo-damage (based on spindle loads) is representative of the vehicle's duty cycle. The third step in the process is developing a multi-axis laboratory rig test for the suspension system, such that the accumulated damage in the proving ground is replicated in a compressed time frame.
2000-12-04
Technical Paper
2000-01-3467
Scott Kuan, Dean House, Tomaz Varela, Shan Shih
In recent years, several transit agencies have tested buses equipped with hybrid powertrain systems. It has been reported that hybrid powertrains have significant advantages over conventional diesel engine systems, in the area of emissions and fuel economy performance. Presented in this paper are engineering issues and suggestions from an auto component supplier point of view in the design of such a powertrain system. The particular system being considered consists of a downsized diesel engine, a generator, a battery package, two identical AC induction motors, and gearbox systems for the left and right driven wheels. The assembly is supported by an H-shaped suspension sub-structure uniquely designed to achieve the “ultra-low floor” configuration. Our discussion covers the system performance, as well as the durability issues. In particular, the presentation focuses on the durability and the design layout of the gearbox and suspension substructure.
2000-12-04
Technical Paper
2000-01-3417
Shan Shih, Rajesh Somnay, Robert Hannon, Joseph Kay
Effective linear and nonlinear drum brake system FEA (finite element analysis) models have been developed. Such models can help engineers understand many drum brake related issues, such as lining wear and mechanical and thermal instability. The pressure distribution at the drum and lining interface is an important piece of information in drum brake design. Besides the accurate prediction of the shoe factor, the models can be used to guide designs for improving brake efficiency, reducing component weight and enhancing durability. Progress is also being made in developing hybrid models that integrate FEA models with other analysis techniques. This approach offers engineers easy-to-use design tools. The integrated design and analysis approach will help product design and development by reducing cycle time, cost and improving product quality.
2001-11-12
Technical Paper
2001-01-2735
Scott Kuan, Shan Shih, Jim Grant
Nowadays, developing web (World Wide Web) engineering is considered to be a top priority task in many companies. A corporate web information center with broad coverage to support a company's worldwide engineering activities can make the product development and customer support more efficient. First, the archived, readily available product information, knowledge database, and user friendly engineering tools can ease up the more ever demanding engineering jobs. Second, the convenient information storage, retrieval systems and hyperlinks on the web should ensure effective communications among engineers, customers, and suppliers. However, without in-depth planning, the full benefits of web engineering cannot be realized. To be effective, other companion engineering programs must also be instated. This paper reviews the experience we have gained in utilizing web engineering for product development and customer support.
1992-11-01
Technical Paper
922481
Christopher S. Keeney, Shan Shih
Powertrain torsional vibration has become a subject of increasing concern for the heavy duty truck industry in recent years. This is due in part to truck and diesel engine developments, and to drivetrain system trends. A computer simulation is an effective tool in analyzing this problem. A powertrain vibration analysis program has been developed by the authors. It has been used extensively in the evaluation and optimization of powertrain system performance. In this paper, first the heavy duty powertrain is characterized as a vibrating system. Its natural frequencies, mode shapes and frequency response characteristics are reviewed. Second, the theory of torsional vibration and its application in the simulation are described. The drivetrain is described as a discreet model. An undamped modal analysis is given as an eigenvalue problem.
2005-11-01
Technical Paper
2005-01-3609
Ramesh Edara, Shan Shih, Nasser Tamini, Tim Palmer, Arthur Tang
Virtual proving ground (VPG) simulations have been popular with passenger vehicles. VPG uses LS-DYNA based non-linear contact Finite Element analysis (FEA) to estimate fully analytical road loads and to predict structural components durability with PG road surfaces and tire represented as Finite elements. Heavy vehicle industry has not used these tools extensively in the past due to the complexity of heavy vehicle systems and especially due to the higher number of tires in the vehicle compared to the passenger car. The higher number tires in the heavy vehicle requires more computational analysis duration compared to the passenger car. However due to the recent advancements in computer hardware, virtual proving ground simulations can be used for heavy vehicles. In this study we have used virtual proving ground based simulation studies to predict the durability performance of a trailer suspension frame.
1999-11-15
Technical Paper
1999-01-3745
Shan Shih, Scott Kuan, Jerry Tou, Fred Huscher
Although the methodology of straight bevel gear tooth form generation has been known for quite some time, few references are available in the literature. Presented in this paper are the general numerical procedures of spherical involute and octoid tooth form generations. We have proven that a tooth form generated from the latter approach, by simulating the rotation of a crown gear, matches exactly with the one from the former approach of unwraping a wire from a base circle. The advantage of using general numerical procedures rather than closed form equations is the flexibility of generating both standard and modified gear tooth profiles. In making the forging die, the gear tooth form must be developed with considerations of both the theoretical optimal geometry, and the dimensional compensation for heat treatment distortion.
1998-11-16
Technical Paper
982824
Shan Shih, Scott Kuan, Chris Keeney, Ragnar Ledesma
The uniqueness of heavy and medium duty vehicle powertrain design, compared to that of passenger cars, is two fold: vast variations exist from vehicle to vehicle because of mission requirements, and powertrain components are sourced from a diverse group of suppliers. Vehicle powertrain design involves selection of the appropriate major components, such as the engine, clutch, transmission, driveline, and axle. At this design stage the main focus is on power matching, to ensure that the vehicle's performance meets specifications of gradability, maximum speed, acceleration, fuel economy, and emissions[1, 2, 3, 4 and 5]. The general practice also demands that the durability of the drivetrain components for the intended vocation or application be verified. Equally important but often neglected in the design phase is the system's NVH (Noise Vibration and Harshness) performance, such as torsional vibration, U-joint excitation, and gear rattle.
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