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2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1329
Mario Castagnola, Jonathan Caserta, Sougato Chatterjee, Hai-Ying Chen, Raymond Conway, Joseph Fedeyko, Wassim Klink, Penelope Markatou, Sandip Shah, Andrew Walker
Since early 2010, most new medium- and heavy-duty diesel vehicles in the US rely on urea-based Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for meeting the most stringent regulations on nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in the world today. Catalyst technologies of choice include Copper (Cu)- and Iron (Fe)-based SCR. In this work, the performances of Fe-SCR and Cu-SCR were investigated in the most commonly used DOC + CSF + SCR system configuration. Cu-SCR offered advantages over Fe-SCR in terms of low temperature conversion, NO₂:NOx ratio tolerance and NH₃ slip, while Fe-SCR demonstrated superior performance under optimized NO₂:NOx ratio and at higher temperatures. The Cu-SCR catalyst displayed less tolerance to sulfur (S) exposure. Reactor testing has shown that Cu-SCR catalysts deactivate at low temperature when poisoned by sulfur.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1312
Mojghan Naseri, Sougato Chatterjee, Mario Castagnola, Hai-Ying Chen, Joseph Fedeyko, Howard Hess, Jianquan Li
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. Typical 2010 Heavy-Duty systems include a DOC along with a catalyzed soot filter (CSF) in addition to the SCR sub-assembly. There is a strong desire to further increase the NOx conversion capability of such systems, to enable additional fuel economy savings by allowing engines to be calibrated to higher engine-out NOx levels. One potential approach is to replace the CSF with a diesel particulate filter coated with SCR catalysts (SCR-DPF) while keeping the flow-through SCR elements downstream, which essentially increases the SCR volume in the after-treatment assembly without affecting the overall packaging. In this work, a system consisting of SCR-DPF was evaluated in comparison to the DOC + CSF components from a commercial 2010 DOC + CSF + SCR system on an engine with the engine EGR on (standard engine-out NOx) and off (high engine-out NOx).
2000-03-06
Technical Paper
2000-01-0479
Ray Conway, Sougato Chatterjee, Hassan Windawi
The EPA implemented the Urban Bus Retrofit/Rebuild (UBRR) Program for transit buses built before 1994 in an effort to lower the amount of PM emissions in densely populated urban areas. The objective of the program is to provide certified emission control technologies that reduce PM emissions from older buses by 25% or to below 0.1 g/bhp-hr. This paper reviews the development of a retrofit kit that has been certified under the UBRR program to meet the 0.1 g/bhp-hr PM emission requirements on DDC 6V92TA engines with both mechanical (MUI) and electronic (DDEC) fuel injection controls. The kit is a combination of specific and modified engine parts and a catalytic exhaust after-treatment device. The kit replaces existing parts with a new camshaft, a uniquely configured cylinder kit and specified turbocharger, blower and injector. For the MUI engines the cam timing, injector height and fuel modulator are set at specific values to achieve the lowest possible PM level.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0992
Mojghan Naseri, Ceren Aydin, Shadab Mulla, Raymond Conway, Sougato Chatterjee
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems have been demonstrated as effective solutions for controlling NOx emissions from Heavy Duty diesel engines. Future HD diesel engines are being designed for higher engine out NOx to improve fuel economy, while discussions are in progress for tightening NOx emissions from HD engines post 2020. This will require increasingly higher NOx conversions across the emission control system and will challenge the current aftertreatment designs. Typical 2010/2013 Heavy Duty systems include a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) along with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) in addition to the SCR sub-assembly. For future aftertreatment designs, advanced technologies such as cold start concept (dCSC™) catalyst, SCR coated on filter (SCRF® hereafter referred to as SCR-DPF) and SCR coated on high porous flow through substrates can be utilized to achieve high NOx conversions, in combination with improved control strategies.
2008-01-09
Technical Paper
2008-28-0021
Sougato Chatterjee, Andrew P. Walker, Philip G. Blakeman
The modern Diesel engine is one of the most versatile power sources available for mobile applications. The high fuel economy and torque of the Diesel engine has long resulted in global application for heavy-duty applications. Moreover, the high power and excellent driveability of today's turbo-charged small high-speed Diesel engines, coupled with their low CO2 emissions, has resulted in an increasing demand for Diesel powered light-duty vehicles. However, the demand for Diesel vehicles can only be realised if their exhaust emissions meet the increasingly stringent emissions legislation being introduced around the world. In the USA, both HDD and LDD vehicles are meeting strict emissions legislations since 2007 with the introduction of particle filters which will be further restricted from 2010 with the use of additional NOx contr5ol systems. In Europe, similar strict requirements are being implemented with Euro IV, Euro V and finally through Euro VI legislations.
2006-10-31
Technical Paper
2006-01-3553
Ajay Joshi, Sougato Chatterjee, Aniket Sawant, Claes Akerlund, Sören Andersson, Micael Blomquist, Jeff Brooks, Spiro Kattan
Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) such as the Continuously Regenerating Technology (CRT®) particulate filters are known to be highly effective in reducing PM emissions from diesel engines. Passive DPFs such as the CRT filter operate by collecting soot in the filter and subsequently oxidizing this soot in the presence of NO2 generated by an upstream Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC). Both the NO2 generation and subsequent soot oxidation reactions require a certain minimum exhaust temperature. In addition, the engine out NOx to PM ratio is also critical for continuous and successful regeneration of the filter. However, these criteria may not always be met, particularly on low temperature applications such as refuse vehicles and newer low NOx (2.5 g/bhp-hr NOx) engines. This paper discusses the development of an actively regenerating diesel particulate filter (ACR-DPF) system for retrofit applications on heavy duty diesel vehicles.
2000-10-16
Technical Paper
2000-01-2821
Keith Vertin, Kevin Chandler, Chuck LeTavec, Stephen Goguen, Donald Keski-Hynnila, Sougato Chatterjee, Gerry Smith, Kevin Hallstrom
Previous studies have shown that regenerating particulate filters are very effective at reducing particulate matter emissions from diesel engines. Some particulate filters are passive devices that can be installed in place of the muffler on both new and older model diesel engines. These passive devices could potentially be used to retrofit large numbers of trucks and buses already in service, to substantially reduce particulate matter emissions. Catalyst-type particulate filters must be used with diesel fuels having low sulfur content to avoid poisoning the catalyst. A project has been launched to evaluate a truck fleet retrofitted with two types of passive particulate filter systems and operating on diesel fuel having ultra-low sulfur content. The objective of this project is to evaluate new particulate filter and fuel technology in service, using a fleet of twenty Class 8 grocery store trucks. This paper summarizes the truck fleet start-up experience.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0125
Sougato Chatterjee, Mojghan Naseri, Jianquan Li
Abstract The next generation advanced emission regulations have been proposed for the Indian heavy duty automotive industry for implementation from 2020. These BS VI emission regulations will require both advanced NOx control as well as advanced PM (Particulate Matter) control along with Particle Number limitations. This will require implementation of full DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) and simultaneous NOx control using SCR technologies. DPF technologies have already been successfully implemented in Euro VI and US 10 HDD systems. These systems use low temperature NO2 based passive DPF regeneration as well as high temperature oxygen based active DPF regeneration. Effective DPF and DOC designs are essential to enable successful DPF regeneration (minimize soot loading in the DPF) while operating HDD vehicles under transient conditions. DOC designs are optimized to oxidize engine out NO into NO2, which helps with passive DPF regeneration.
2005-11-01
Technical Paper
2005-01-3548
Ray Conway, Sougato Chatterjee, Alex Beavan, Claus Goersmann, Andy Walker
The application of oxidation catalyst and particulate filter technology for the reduction of particulate matter (PM), hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from heavy duty diesel engines has become an established practice. The design and performance of such systems have been commercially proven to the point that the application of these technologies is cost effective and durable. The application of an effective NOx reduction technology in heavy duty diesel applications is more complicated since there are no passive NOx reduction technologies that can be fit onto HDD vehicles. However, Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems using Urea injection to achieve NOx reduction have become the technology of choice in Europe and have been applied to achieve Euro IV emissions levels on new HDD vehicles. In addition, retrofit SCR emission control systems have also been developed that can provide high NOx reduction when applied on existing HDD vehicles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1033
Raymond Conway, Sougato Chatterjee, Mojghan Naseri, Ceren Aydin
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. Typical 2013 Heavy Duty Diesel emission control systems include a DOC upstream of a catalyzed soot filter (CSF) which is followed by urea injection and the SCR sub-assembly. There is a strong desire to further increase the NOx conversion capability of such systems, which would enable additional fuel economy savings by allowing engines to be calibrated to higher engine-out NOx levels. One potential approach is to replace the CSF with a diesel particulate filter coated with SCR catalysts (SCRF® technology, hereafter referred to as SCR-DPF) while keeping the flow-through SCR elements downstream, which essentially increases the SCR volume in the after-treatment assembly without affecting the overall packaging.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1525
Mojghan Naseri, Raymond Conway, Howard Hess, Ceren Aydin, Sougato Chatterjee
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems have been demonstrated as effective solutions for controlling NOx emissions from Heavy Duty diesel engines. Future HD diesel engines are being designed for higher engine out NOx to improve fuel economy, which will require increasingly higher NOx conversion to meet emission regulations. For future aftertreatment designs, advanced technologies such as SCR coated on filter (SCRF®) and SCR coated on high porous flow through substrates can be utilized to achieve high NOx conversion. In this work, different options were evaluated for achieving high NOx conversion. First, high performance NOx control catalysts were designed by using SCRF unit followed by additional SCR on high porosity substrates. Second, different control strategies were evaluated to understand the effect of reductant dosing strategy and thermal management on NOx conversion. Tests were carried out on a HD engine under transient test cycles.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1521
Jason D. Pless, Mojghan Naseri, Wassim Klink, Glen Spreitzer, Sougato Chatterjee, Penelope Markatou
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. There is a drive to reduce the overall packaging volume of the aftertreatment system for these applications. In addition, more active SCR catalysts will be needed as the applications become more challenging: e.g. lower temperatures and higher engine out NOx, for fuel consumption improvements. One approach to meet the challenges of reduced volume and/or higher NOx reduction is to increase the active site density of the SCR catalyst by coating higher amount of SCR catalyst on high porosity substrates (HPS). This approach could enable the reduction of the overall packaging volume while maintaining similar NOx conversion as compared to 2010/2013 systems, or improve the NOx reduction performance for equivalent volume and NH3 slip.
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