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Viewing 1 to 30 of 1318
2010-10-25
Journal Article
2010-01-2104
Ulf Aronsson, Clément Chartier, Öivind Andersson, Bengt Johansson, Johan Sjöholm, Rikard Wellander, Mattias Richter, Marcus Alden, Paul C. Miles
The soot distribution as function of ambient O₂ mole fraction in a heavy-duty diesel engine was investigated at low load (6 bar IMEP) with laser-induced incandescence (LII) and natural luminosity. A Multi-YAG laser system was utilized to create time-resolved LII using 8 laser pulses with a spacing of one CAD with detection on an 8-chip framing camera. It is well known that the engine-out smoke level increases with decreasing oxygen fraction up to a certain level where it starts to decrease again. For the studied case the peak occurred at an O₂ fraction of 11.4%. When the oxygen fraction was decreased successively from 21% to 9%, the initial soot formation moved downstream in the jet. At the lower oxygen fractions, below 12%, no soot was formed until after the wall interaction. At oxygen fractions below 11% the first evidence of soot is in the recirculation zone between two adjacent jets.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0333
Yousef Jeihouni, Stefan Pischinger, Ludger Ruhkamp, Thomas Koerfer
Fuel properties are always considered as one of the main factors to diesel engines concerning performance and emission discussions. There are still challenges for researchers to identify the most correlating and non-correlating fuel properties and their effects on engine behavior. Statistical analyses have been applied in this study to derive the most un-correlating properties. In parallel, sensitivity analysis was performed for the fuel properties as well as to the emission and performance of the engine. On one hand, two different analyses were implemented; one with consideration of both, non-aromatic and aromatic fuels, and the other were performed separately for each individual fuel group. The results offer a different influence on each type of analysis. Finally, by considering both methods, most common correlating and non-correlating properties have been derived.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0335
Lucas Murphy, David Rothamer
The effects of jet fuel properties on compression ignition engine operation were investigated under high-load conditions for jet fuels with varying cetane number. A single-cylinder oil-test engine (SCOTE) with 2.44 L displacement was used to test a baseline #2 diesel fuel with a cetane number of 43, a Jet-A fuel with a cetane number of 47, and two mixtures of Jet-A and a Fishcer-Tropsch JP-8 with cetane numbers of 36 and 42, respectively. The engine was operated under high-load conditions corresponding to traditional diesel combustion, using a single injection of fuel near TDC. The fuels were tested using two different intake camshafts with closing times of -143 and -85 CAD BTDC. Injection timing sweeps were performed over a range of injection timings near TDC for each camshaft. The apparent net heat release rate (AHRR) data showed an increase in the premixed burn magnitude as cetane number decreased in agreement with previous work.
2013-09-24
Journal Article
2013-01-2475
Taizo Shimada, Mitsuo Notomi, Junya Tanaka, Koji Korematsu
In recent years, trans-esterified vegetable oils have been widely applied to diesel engine in order to suppress greenhouse gas emissions. However, “neat” vegetable oils are expected to be directly used to resolve some difficulties faced in their use, such high viscosity and slightly high fuel consumption. In this study neat linseed oil has been investigated as a neat vegetable oil. It was found to show higher fuel consumption than diesel fuel, however at the same time it showed lower indicated fuel consumption than diesel fuel. These results suggest some increase in engine friction loss in a neat biofuel diesel engine. Studies have been extensively investigated the difference in friction loss and a newly developed “improved deceleration method” has been applied.
2013-09-24
Journal Article
2013-01-2474
Helmut Theissl, Alois Danninger, Thomas Sacher, Herwig Ofner, Erwin Schalk
This paper describes a method for optimization of engine settings in view of best total cost of operation fluids. Under specific legal NOX tailpipe emissions requirements the engine out NOX can be matched to the current achievable SCR NOX conversion efficiency. In view of a heavy duty long haul truck application various specific engine operation modes are defined. A heavy duty diesel engine was calibrated for all operation modes in an engine test cell. The characteristics of engine operation are demonstrated in different transient test cycles. Optimum engine operation mode (EOM) selection strategies between individual engine operation modes are discussed in view of legal test cycles and real world driving cycles which have been derived from on-road tests.
2013-09-24
Journal Article
2013-01-2430
James Smith, Justin Greuel, Brian Ratkos, Ethan Schauer
Implementation of EPA's heavy-duty engine NOx standard of 0.20 g/bhp-hr has resulted in the introduction of a new generation of emission control systems for on-highway heavy-duty diesel engines. These new control systems are predominantly based around aftertreatment systems utilizing urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) techniques, with only one manufacturer relying solely on in-cylinder NOx emission reduction techniques. As with any new technology, EPA is interested in evaluating whether these systems are delivering the expected emissions reductions under real-world conditions and where areas for improvement may lie. To accomplish these goals, an in-situ gaseous emissions measurement study was conducted using portable emissions measurement devices. The first stage of this study, and subject of this paper, focused on engines typically used in line-haul trucking applications (12-15L displacement).
2013-09-24
Journal Article
2013-01-2422
Yu Zhang, Ilya Sagalovich, William De Ojeda, Andrew Ickes, Thomas Wallner, David D. Wickman
Low temperature combustion through in-cylinder blending of fuels with different reactivity offers the potential to improve engine efficiency while yielding low engine-out NOx and soot emissions. A Navistar MaxxForce 13 heavy-duty compression ignition engine was modified to run with two separate fuel systems, aiming to utilize fuel reactivity to demonstrate a technical path towards high engine efficiency. The dual-fuel engine has a geometric compression ratio of 14 and uses sequential, multi-port-injection of a low reactivity fuel in combination with in-cylinder direct injection of diesel. Through control of in-cylinder charge reactivity and reactivity stratification, the engine combustion process can be tailored towards high efficiency and low engine-out emissions. Engine testing was conducted at 1200 rpm over a load sweep.
2013-09-24
Journal Article
2013-01-2421
Donald W. Stanton
With increasing energy prices and concerns about the environmental impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, a growing number of national governments are putting emphasis on improving the energy efficiency of the equipment employed throughout their transportation systems. Within the U.S. transportation sector, energy use in commercial vehicles has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles. A 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected from 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double.
2013-11-27
Technical Paper
2013-01-2759
Pedro Manuel Barroso Guzman, Xavier Ribas, José María García Sr, Mario Pita Sr
The objective of this study is to describe the results on Particle Matter and CO2 emissions when an existing Heavy-Duty diesel engine for on-highway truck applications is converted to a Dual-fuel engine (diesel + Natural Gas) during the freeway part of transient worldwide emission tests. A Dual-fuel engine with Homogeneous Gas Charge Injection in the intake line before turbocharger was considered. The results showed the feasibility of this kind of technology for transient operation reaching a significant reduction of Particle Matter plus a decrement in CO2 emissions compared to diesel baseline engine. The results of gas energy replacement ratio, brake fuel conversion efficiency, CO and unburned hydrocarbons in the exhaust gases are also shown.
2013-09-08
Technical Paper
2013-24-0170
Hemanth Kappanna, Marc Besch, Arvind Thiruvengadam, Oscar Delgado, Alessandro Cozzolini, Daniel Carder, Mridul Gautam, Shaohua Hu, Tao Huai, Alberto Ayala, Adewale Oshinuga, Randall Pasek
The study was aimed at assessing in-use emissions of a USEPA 2010 emissions-compliant heavy-duty diesel vehicle powered by a model year (MY) 2011 engine using West Virginia University's Transportable Emissions Measurement System (TEMS). The TEMS houses full-scale CVS dilution tunnel and laboratory-grade emissions measurement systems, which are compliant with the Code of Federal Regulation (CFR), Title 40, Part 1065 [1] emissions measurement specifications. One of the specific objectives of the study, and the key topic of this paper, is the quantification of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (CO2, N2O and CH4) along with ammonia (NH3) and regulated emissions during real-world operation of a long-haul heavy-duty vehicle, equipped with a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and urea based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) aftertreatment system for PM and NOx reduction, respectively.
2013-09-08
Journal Article
2013-24-0177
Philipp Vögelin, Peter Obrecht, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Future engine emission legislation regulates soot from Diesel engines strictly and requires improvements in engine calibration, fast response sensor equipment and exhaust gas aftertreatment systems. The in-cylinder phenomena of soot formation and oxidation can be analysed using a pyrometer with optical access to the combustion chamber. The pyrometer collects the radiation of soot particles during diffusion combustion, and allows the calculation of soot temperature and a proportional value for the in-cylinder soot density (KL). A four-cylinder heavy-duty Diesel engine was equipped in all cylinders with prototype pyrometers and state of the art pressure transducers. The cylinder specific data was recorded crank angle-resolved for a set of steady-state and transient operating conditions, as well as exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) addition and over a wide range of soot emissions.
2013-09-24
Technical Paper
2013-01-2381
Shannon K. Sweeney
This paper presents a simple method of estimating steady-state diesel engine disturbance amplitudes that can be used in rigid-body, low frequency vibration modeling to predict the performance of an engine's isolation suspension and its components. The internal disturbances occurring at each cylinder and crank throw are determined and combined to provide the net disturbances for several common four-stroke diesel engine configurations. The method utilizes a simplified Fourier decomposition of diesel combustion and the predominant inertia disturbances from within the engine. With a few pieces of information from the engine maker, actual disturbance amplitudes and phases can be estimated. Conditions and simplifying assumptions are discussed. The estimated disturbance amplitudes can also be used in torsional vibration modeling of the drivetrain.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0923
E. G. Pariotis, D. T. Hountalas
This work is a part of an extended investigation conducted by the authors to validate and improve a newly developed quasi-dimensional combustion model. The model has been initially applied on an old technology, naturally aspirated HSDI Diesel engine and the results were satisfying as far as performance and pollutant emissions (Soot and NO) are concerned. But since obviously further and more extended validation is required, in the present study the model is applied on a new technology, heavy-duty turbocharged DI Diesel engine equipped with a high pressure PLN fuel injection system. The main feature of the model is that it describes the air-fuel mixing mechanism in a more fundamental way compared to existing multi-zone phenomenological combustion models, while being less time consuming and complicated compared to the more accurate CFD models. The finite volume method is used to solve the conservation equations of mass, energy and species concentration.
2004-10-26
Technical Paper
2004-01-2688
Dogan San, Ergun Guraslan, Omer Rustu Ergen, Korhan Kanar
FORD OTOSAN has developed a new heavy-duty diesel engine, ECOTORQ, for the new Ford Cargo Trucks whose production started in September 2003. The engine is 7.3 liters, 6-cylinder in-line, with common rail fuel injection system and overhead camshaft design having 4 valves per cylinder. The engine meets the Euro-III exhaust emissions limits, which were in effect when it was introduced, and the engine incorporates the potential to meet Euro-IV. Modern computation and simulation methods were used and extensive experimental studies were made during the design and development stages, which helped reach the targets of compactness, modular structure, low fuel consumption, low noise level and low emissions.
2004-10-26
Technical Paper
2004-01-2697
Leonard Kuo-Liang Shih, Tien-Chou Hsu
In the past decades, the diesel engines are considered as the major power source, not only because of their high thermal efficiency, high torque output, and easy maintenance; but also due to the improved exhaust emissions reduction technology. In order to increase the thermal efficiency, the low heat rejection ceramic coating engine is one of the possible solutions for future engine manufacturing. Due to the thermal insulating effects of the ceramic material (low thermal conductivity), the cylinder charge and engine components' temperatures are substantially increased. However, the thermal impact problem and the possible high friction characteristics of the new coating material can be deadly to the engine's lifetime. Various non-ceramic and ceramic materials are tested in this research to decide their thermal insulating effects on the engine performance and their downside on the friction and thermal impact problems.
2013-01-09
Technical Paper
2013-26-0054
Dushyant Bhatt, Shivraj Waje, K. V. R. Babu, Jurgen Henn, Sven Seifert, R. M. Cursetji, Dinesh Kumar, Touquire A. Siddiquie
Small Commercial Vehicle (SCV) is an emerging Commercial Vehicle (CV) segment both in India and throughout the world. Vehicles in this segment have diesel engine of capacity less than 1 l and GVW of less than 3.5 t. Normally for the CV, engines are tested on engine dynamometer for emission test, but SCV are tested on chassis dynamometer as they are classified as N1.1 class vehicles. Hence SCV have to follow same emission regulations as diesel passenger cars. The main challenge is to meet BS-IV NOx and PM emission target together with high torque optimization along with required durability targets. This paper addresses this challenge and reports the work carried out on an Indian SCV with 0.7 l naturally aspirated indirect injection diesel engine.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0252
Sergio William Botero, Marcos Fernando Mendes de Brito, Rogério Nascimento de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Scardini Villela, Tadeu Cavalcante Cordeiro de Melo
The development of new fuels involves several areas of an oil company and several tests, including vehicle emissions tests on chassis dynamometers and engine performance tests on engine bench laboratory. Particularly for diesel and blends of gasoline fuels, an important test is to evaluate the engine speed profile during the vehicle cold start. In this work, for engine speed profile analysis, it was developed a system to acquire data using the engine's flywheel ring gear information and the audio input of a standard notebook computer. It was also developed a specific software to analyze the acquired signals. The system is able to point out several important features of the engine start such as the starter motor beginning of operation, the maximum engine speed during the start time, the settling time and the engine idling speed. All of this information can be collected using a low cost set of instrumentation devices.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0145
Eduardo Sala Polati, Paulo Henrique Rohenkhol
The commercialization of additives for treating internal combustion engine oils in Brazil was regulated by ANP Ordinance n° 131, from 30.7.1999 and revoked by ANP Resolution n° 10, from 07.03.2007, where requires the performance proof of the referred additive following the ASTM Sequence IIIF bench engine test. The test PB/IMI-1109S3FGM151-2 establishes a procedure to evaluate internal combustion engine oils as well as additives against special performance conditions particularly operating at high temperature based on ASTM D 6984-09 Sequence IIIF procedure. This test measures oil thickening, sludge and varnish formation in engine components, piston deposits, oil consumption and camshaft wear. The ASTM procedure also suggests the use of any engine that proves the competence to accelerate thermochemical deterioration of lubricants under severe operating conditions and temperature, allowing in that way the development of this test procedure.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0184
Leonardo de Oliveira Costa, James Edward Godden, Rafael Batista Amadio, Rodrigo Silva Santos
Emission standards are becoming more stringent and at the same time the standards for the On-Board Diagnostic System (OBD) are also continuously enhancing to ensure a more efficient and robust engine emissions monitoring system during the whole vehicle useful life and to improve the quality of the information delivered to the user. In the case of heavy duty diesel vehicles, the Brazilian standards are developed according to the existing European standards (Euro), for example the current standard in Brazil (so called Proconve P7) follows the same requirements of the Euro V with some minor differences. As a consequence, the applied technologies for exhaust gas after-treatment and sensing systems to meet the requirements are already used in European applications such as Selective Catalytic Reduction System (SCR), Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) and Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), as well as temperature, NOx and differential pressure sensors.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0182
M. Pontoppidan, G. Montanari
The paper gives a short introduction to the bio-diesel mixture approach for diesel engines. The paper continues with a description of the design of a strategy for recognition of a random bio-diesel fraction, Bx, by a purely software-based sensing technique, which creates an image of the temporal combustion behavior and uses only sensors already in service for current common rail mixture preparation systems. A short description is made of a baseline approach of sensing technique based on the presence of a crank angle speed sensor. Hereafter the paper presents the introduction of several integral or Upper Level (UL) key-parameters used to enhance the precision of the Bx-detection or completely replace the original lower level combustion key-parameter set, which relates the instantaneous fraction of bio-diesel, Bx, to the engine torque.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0595
Wiliam Tean Su
In the past few years, Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has become an almost essential engineering tool in product development. In addition to that, structural optimization, which is almost as old as the finite element method, is a widely used tool in engineering product design definition. One vastly used method is the shape optimization, which has as an objective the minimization of stress concentration on determined regions. In this work, a 6 cylinder diesel engine crankshaft was analyzed and a structural optimization was performed, more specifically at the web region. The interpretation of the shape optimization results led to a slightly modified geometry of the crankshaft, with the mass of the crankshaft throw only 0.5% higher than the original model. Also, the fatigue safety factor evaluation was performed for both reference and optimized crankshafts as a comparison criterion. The same boundary condition used in the shape optimization was employed for the fatigue factor evaluation.
2013-10-07
Technical Paper
2013-36-0571
B. Heuser, M. Jakob, F. Kremer, Stefan Pischinger, B. Kerschgens, H. Pitsch
In order to deeply investigate and improve the complete path from biofuel production to combustion, the cluster of excellence “Tailor-Made Fuels from Biomass” was installed at RWTH Aachen University in 2007. Recently, new pathways have been discovered to synthesize octanol [1] and di-n-butylether (DNBE). These molecules are identical in the number of included hydrogen, oxygen and carbon atoms, but differ in the molecular structure: for octanol, the oxygen atom is at the end of the molecule, whereas for DNBE it is located in the middle. In this paper the utilization of octanol and DNBE in a state-of-the-art single cylinder diesel research engine will be discussed. The major interest has been on engine emissions (NOx, PM, HC, CO, noise) compared to conventional diesel fuel.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0817
Chenaniah Langness, Michael Mangus, Christopher Depcik
Abstract In order to perform cutting-edge engine research that applies to modern Compression Ignition (CI) engines, a sophisticated test cell is needed that allows control of the engine and its auxiliary systems. The primary obstacle to the completion of such a test cell is the up-front expense. This paper covers the construction of a low cost, single-cylinder engine test cell while demonstrating the type of research that can be accomplished along the way. The components necessary for the construction, instrumentation, and operation of such a test cell, neglecting emissions analysis equipment, can be obtained for less than $150,000. The engine utilized, a naturally-aspirated single-cylinder Yanmar L100V, was purchased as an engine-generator package.
2013-09-08
Journal Article
2013-24-0012
Mirko Baratta, Roberto Finesso, Hamed Kheshtinejad, Daniela Misul, Ezio Spessa, Yixin Yang, Massimo Arcidiacono
An innovative 0D predictive combustion model for the simulation of the HRR (heat release rate) in DI diesel engines was assessed and implemented in a 1D fluid-dynamic commercial code for the simulation of a Fiat heavy duty diesel engine equipped with a Variable Geometry Turbocharger system, in the frame of the CORE (CO2 reduction for long distance transport) Collaborative Project of the European Community, VII FP. The 0D combustion approach starts from the calculation of the injection rate profile on the basis of the injected fuel quantities and on the injection parameters, such as the start of injection and the energizing time, taking the injector opening and closure delays into account. The injection rate profile in turn allows the released chemical energy to be estimated. The approach assumes that HRR is proportional to the energy associated with the accumulated fuel mass in the combustion chamber.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0819
Ossi Kaario, Anders Brink, Kalle Lehto, Karri Keskinen, Martti Larmi
New measurements have been done in order to obtain information concerning the effect of EGR and a paraffinic hydrotreated fuel for the smoke and NO emissions of a heavy-duty diesel engine. Measured smoke number and NO emissions are explained using detailed chemical kinetic calculations and CFD simulations. The local conditions in the research engine are analyzed by creating equivalence ratio - temperature (Phi-T) maps and analyzing the CFD results within these maps. The study uses different amount of EGR and two different diesel fuels; standard EN590 diesel fuel and a paraffinic hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO). The detailed chemical kinetic calculations take into account the different EGR rates and the properties of the fuels. The residence time in the kinetical calculations is used to explain sooting combustion behavior within diesel combustion. It was observed that NO emission trends can be well captured with the Phi-T maps but the situation is more difficult with the engine smoke.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1140
Julian Tan, Charles Solbrig, Steven J. Schmieg
Diesel engines have the potential to significantly increase vehicle fuel economy and decrease CO₂ emissions; however, efficient removal of NOx and particulate matter from the engine exhaust is required to meet stringent emission standards. A conventional diesel aftertreatment system consists of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), a urea-based Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR) catalyst and a diesel particulate filter (DPF), and is widely used to meet the most recent NOx (nitrogen oxides comprising NO and NO₂) and particulate matter (PM) emission standards for medium- and heavy-duty sport utility and truck vehicles. The increasingly stringent emission targets have recently pushed this system layout towards an increase in size of the components and consequently higher system cost. An emerging technology developed recently involves placing the SCR catalyst onto the conventional wall-flow filter.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1207
Wim Van Dam, Mark W. Cooper, Kenneth Oxorn, Scott Richards
Since the invention of the internal combustion engine, the contact between piston ring and cylinder liner has been a major concern for engine builders. The quality and durability of this contact has been linked to the life of the engine, its maintenance, and its exhaust gas and blowby emissions, but also to its factional properties and therefore fuel economy. While the basic design has not changed, many factors that affect the performance of the ring/liner contact have evolved and are still evolving. This paper provides an overview of observations related to the lubrication of the ring/liner contact.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1206
Wim van Dam, Trevor Miller, Gary Parsons
The heightened interest level in Fuel Economy for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines the industry has seen over the last few years continues to be high, and is not likely to change. Lowering the fuel consumption of all internal combustion engines remains a priority for years to come, driven by economic, legislative, and environmental reasons. While it is generally assumed that lower viscosity grade lubricants offer fuel economy benefits, there is a lot of confusion about exactly what drives the fuel economy benefits. Fuel Economy claims in trade literature vary over a broad range and it is difficult for the end user to determine what to expect when a change in lubricant viscosity is adopted for a fleet of vehicles in a certain type of operation. This publication makes an attempt at clarifying a number of these uncertainties with the help of additional engine test data, and more extensive data analysis.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1330
Chaitanya Narula, Xiaofan Yang, Peter Bonnesen, Edward Hagaman
The leading approach for reduction of NOx from diesel engines is selective catalytic reduction employing urea as a reductant (NH₃- or urea-SCR). For passenger vehicles, the best known NH₃-SCR catalysts are Cu-ZSM-5 and Fe-ZSM-5 and have been shown to function very well in a narrow temperature range. This technology is not directly transferable to off-road diesel engines which operate under a different duty cycle resulting in exhaust with different fractions of components than are present in passenger vehicle emissions. Our results show that Cu-ZSM-5 exhibits 90% NOx reduction efficiency in 250-450°C range while Fe-ZSM-5 is highly effective in 350-550°C range for off-road engines. However, a combination of these catalysts cannot efficiently reduce NOx in 150-650°C which is the desirable range for deployment in off-road diesel engines. In our efforts to increase the effective range of these catalysts, we initiated efforts to modify these catalysts by catalyst promoters.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1337
Talus Park, Ho Teng, Gary L. Hunter, Bryan van der Velde, Jeffrey Klaver
A Rankine cycle system with ethanol as the working fluid was developed to investigate the fuel economy benefit of recovering waste heat from a 10.8-liter heavy-duty (HD) truck diesel engine. Recovering rejected heat from a primary engine with a secondary bottoming cycle is a proven concept for improving the overall efficiency of the thermodynamic process. However, the application of waste heat recovery (WHR) technology to the HD diesel engine has proven to be challenging due to cost, complexity, packaging and control during transient operation. This paper discusses the methods and technical innovations required to achieve reliable high performance operation of the WHR system. The control techniques for maintaining optimum energy recovery while protecting the system components and working fluid are described. The experimental results are presented and demonstrate that 3-5% fuel saving is achievable by utilizing this technology.
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