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Viewing 1 to 30 of 41921
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1621
Frank Friedrich
While the microcellular urethane is widely known in the automotive industry for its use in jounce bumpers, its use in Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) applications is often not as well recognized. Even though there are some NVH parts in the market, rubber still dominates it. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the material properties of MCU and their relevance for NVH applications in chassis and suspension components. It will also demonstrate the importance of package design to suit the use of the MCU material. This is especially important to not only achieve the best performance but also keep overall cost and weight under control. Several application types will be introduced with general design suggestions. A detailed design guideline for these applications is not part of this paper. Each application has a large variety of parameters to be considered in the design. They need to be selectively applied based on customer performance targets.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1623
Alan V. Parrett, Chong Wang, Xiandi Zeng, David Nielubowicz, Mark Snowden, Jonathon H. Alexander, Ronald Gerdes, Bill Leeder, Charles Zupan
In recent years several variants of lightweight multi-layered acoustic treatments have been used successfully in vehicles to replace conventional barrier-decoupler interior dash mats. The principle involved is to utilize increased acoustic absorption to offset the decrease in insertion loss from the reduced mass such that equivalent vehicle level performance can be achieved. Typical dual density fibrous constructions consist of a relatively dense cap layer on top of a lofted layer. The density and flow resistivity of these layers are tuned to optimize a balance of insertion loss and absorption performance. Generally these have been found to be very effective with the exception of dash mats with very high insertion loss requirements. This paper describes an alternative treatment which consists of a micro-perforated film top layer and fibrous decoupler layer.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1628
Hejie Lin, Turgay Bengisu, Zissimos Mourelatos
Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR), a copolymer of butadiene and styrene, is widely used in the automotive industry due to its high durability and resistance to abrasion, oils and oxidation. Some of the common applications include tires, vibration isolators, and gaskets, among others. This paper characterizes the dynamic behavior of SBR and discusses the suitability of a visco-elastic model of elastomers, known as the Kelvin model, from a mathematical and physical point of view. An optimization algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the Kelvin model. The resulting model was shown to produce reasonable approximations of measured dynamic stiffness. The model was also used to calculate the self heating of the elastomer due to energy dissipation by the viscous damping components in the model. Developing such a predictive capability is essential in understanding the dynamic behavior of elastomers considering that their dynamic stiffness can in general depend on temperature.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1629
Saurabh Suresh, Jeff Kastner, Teik Lim
Reduction of noise transmitted through laminated glass with interlayer is of interest to vehicle applications. Altering the structure of the interlayer can impact sound transmission loss particularly at the coincidence frequency. This study investigates the feasibility of including a porous layer within the laminated glass to act as an acoustic damper. To understand the underlying physics controlling transmission loss in laminated glass design, an approach utilizing transfer matrices is used for modeling each layer in the laminated glass. These transfer matrices are used to relate the acoustic characteristics of two points within a layer. For any two layers in contact, an interface matrix is defined that relates the acoustic fields of the layers depending on their individual characteristics. The solid layer is modeled as an elastic element and the sound propagation through the porous materials is described using the Biot theory.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1632
Ion Pelinescu, Andrew Christie
One of the most effective NVH solutions used in the automotive industry to reduce structure-borne noise is to apply vibration damping treatments to the vehicle structure. These damping treatments need to meet increasing weight reduction targets, while offering the same or better damping properties. While Liquid Applied Structural Dampers (LASD) are now delivering high damping performance at lower densities, traditional damping measuring techniques are falling short in describing the performance of these extensional layers when applied onto more realistic test samples or real structures. This paper discusses the damping performance of LASD technology, in particular the newer generations of acrylic-based waterborne LASD materials, which through improvements in polymer architecture are achieving increased damping efficiencies together with reduced density.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1624
Prasanth B, Sachin Wagh, David Hudson
Baffle plates with heat reactive expandable foam sealants have increasingly found their applications in automotives. They are used to separate body cavities and to impede noise, water and dust propagation inside of body cavities, thus control noise intrusion into the passenger compartment. Use of these sealant materials has grown significantly as the demands to improve vehicle acoustic performance has increased. Traditionally quantification of the acoustic performance of expandable baffle samples involved making separate vehicles with and without expandable baffles and measure the incab noise to know the effect. The absolute acoustic evaluation of the baffles is very difficult as number of other vehicle parameters is also responsible for vehicle incab noise. Also, it is a time consuming and a costly method to evaluate.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1625
John G. Cherng, Qian Xi, Pravansu Mohanty, Gordon Ebbitt
Acoustical materials are widely used in automotive vehicles and other industrial applications. Two important parameters namely Sound Transmission Loss (STL) and absorption coefficient are commonly used to evaluate the acoustical performance of these materials. Other parameters, such as insertion loss, noise reduction, and loss factors are also used to judge their performance depending on the application of these materials. A systematic comparative study of STL and absorption coefficient was conducted on various porous acoustical materials. Several dozen materials including needled cotton fiber (shoddy) and foam materials with or without barrier/scrim were investigated. The results of STL and absorption coefficient are presented and compared. As expected, it was found that most of materials are either good in STL or good in absorption. However, some combinations can achieve a balance of performance in both categories.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1626
Jonathan Alexander, David Reed, Ronald Gerdes
Flat, constant thickness composites that consisted of a microperforated top layer plus a fibrous decoupler layer were tested for random absorption and transmission loss (TL) performance. The top, microperforated layer consisted of a relatively thick film that contained small, precise micro-perforations. For reference, top layers that consisted of a resistive scrim and an impervious film were also included in this study. Two fibrous materials of constant thickness were used for the decoupler layer between a steel panel and the top microperforated film. The composites' absorption and TL performance were also modeled using the well-known transfer matrix method. This method has been implemented in a commercially available statistical energy analysis (SEA) software package. A comparison of testing and modeling results showed reasonable agreement for absorption results and even better agreement for transmission loss and insertion loss results.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1627
J. Liu, D. W. Herrin
Microperforated panel (MPP) absorbers are rugged, non-combustible, and do not deteriorate over time. That being the case, they are especially suitable for long term use in harsh environments. However, the acoustic performance is modified when contaminated by dust, dirt, or fluids (i.e. oil, water). This paper examines that effect experimentally and correlates the absorption performance with Maa's theory for micro-perforated panels. Transfer impedance and absorption coefficient are measured for different levels of aluminum oxide and carbon dust accumulation. The amount of dust contamination is quantified by measuring the luminance difference between clean and dirty panels with a light meter. The porosity and hole diameter in Maa's equation are modified to account for dust obstruction. The effect of coating the MPP with oil, water, and other appropriate viscous fluids was also measured. This effect was simulated by modifying the viscous factor in Maa's equation.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1634
Michael Dinsmore, Richard Bliton, Scott Perz
Using advanced, multi-layer poro-elastic acoustical material modeling technologies, an example of acoustical performance optimization of an underhood sound absorber application is presented. In this case, a porous facing in combination with a fibrous sound absorber pad is optimized for maximum efficiency, which allows for dramatic reduction in pad density and weight. Overall sound absorption performance is shown to be equal or improved versus frequency relative to the incumbent design.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1637
Ahad Khezerloo, Amin owhadi Esfahani PhD, Sina Jalily lng
One of important problems in railway transportation systems is control of noise and vibration. Metal foams are very good medias for absorbing noise. So in this paper, noise of motion of a train is simulated by MATLAB software and the reduction of noise level in a compartment of passenger car that is equipped by metal foam sheets is considered. Commonly, the sound absorption coefficients are obtained experimentally and they are available in datasheets and references. The different parameters that influence on the capability of this equipment were considered. For example the microstructure, thickness, magnitude of compaction, relative density and etc of metal foam is effective parameters. High porosity has good effect on the performance of absorber sheet. By increasing of compaction ratio, in frequency domain we will have enhancing of absorption of the noise. Compaction process is done by two different ways: one is direct and else is progressively.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1575
John David Fieldhouse, David Bryant, Chris John Talbot
Thermo-elastic and thermo-plastic behaviour takes place with a disc brake during heavy braking and it is this aspect of braking that this paper considers. The work is concerned with working towards developing design advice that provides uniform heating of the disc, and equally important, even dissipation of heat from the disc blade. The material presented emanates from a combination of modeling, on-vehicle testing but mainly laboratory observations and subsequent investigations. The experimental work makes use of a purpose built high speed brake dynamometer which incorporates the full vehicle suspension for controlled simulation of the brake and vehicle operating conditions. Advanced instrumentation allows dynamic measurement of brake pressure fluctuations, disc surface temperature and discrete vibration measurements.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1583
Naga Narayana
Increasing sound quality with advanced audio technology has raised the bar for perceived quality targets for minimal interior noise and maximal speaker sound quality in a passenger vehicle. Speaker-borne structural vibrations and the associated squeak and rattle have been among the most frequent concerns in the perceived audio quality degradation in a vehicle. Digital detection of squeak and rattle issues due to the speaker-borne structural vibrations during the digital vehicle development phase has been a challenge due to the physical complexity involved. Recently, an effective finite element method has been developed to address structure-borne noise [1] and has been applied for detecting the issues of squeak and rattle in passenger vehicles due to vehicle-borne vibrations at vehicle, component and subcomponent levels [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8].
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1604
Zhi-yong Chen, Guang-ming Wu, Wen-ku Shi, Qing-guo Wang, Teng Teng
Hyperelastic model constants of rubber material are predicted based on test date. The fluid-structure interaction model of light vehicle cab's hydraulic mount is established. Static characteristics of the hydraulic mount are analyzed by quasi-static method. In dynamic characteristics analysis, the flow model of fluid is set to turbulent K-Epsilon RNG. The dynamic stiffness and loss angle of the hydraulic mount are presented via the finite element model. The simulations of static and dynamic characteristics agree well with corresponding test results. The effects of main structure parameters to the dynamic characteristics of the hydraulic mount are analyzed based on the finite element model.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1602
Christopher Hartley
Understanding the resonant behavior of vehicle closures such as doors, hoods, trunks, and rear lift gates can be critical to achieve structure-borne noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) performance requirements, particularly below 100Hz. Nearly all closure systems have elastomer weatherstrip components that create a viscoelastic boundary condition along a continuous line around its perimeter and is capable of influencing the resonant behavior of the closure system. This paper outlines an approach to simulate the static and dynamic characteristics of a closed-cell Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) foam rubber weatherstrip component that is first subjected to a large-strain quasi-static preload with a small-strain sinusoidal dynamic load superimposed. An outline of a theoretical approach using “phi-functions” as developed by K.N. Morman Jr., and J.C.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1529
Zhenlin Ji, Zhi Fang
The one-dimensional analytical approach, three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) are developed to predict and analyze the acoustic attenuation performance of three-pass perforated tube muffler with end-resonator. For an elliptical muffler, the predictions of transmission loss from the FEM and BEM agree well each other throughout the frequency range of interest, while the one-dimensional analytical solution shows a reasonable agreement with the numerical predictions at lower frequencies and deviates at higher frequencies. The FEM is then used to investigate the effects of geometrical parameters and internal structure on the acoustic attenuation performance of three-pass perforated tube muffler with end-resonator.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1401
Yoolkoo Kim, Hyundal Park, Jeong Uk An, Tae-Suek Kan, Joonsung Park
Various polymer-based coatings are applied on piston skirt to reduce friction loss between the piston skirt and cylinder bore which is one of main factors of energy loss in an automotive engine system. These coatings generally consist of polymer binder (PAI) and solid lubricants (graphite or MoS₂) for low friction property. On the other hand, the present study found that PTFE as a solid lubricant and nano diamond as hard particles can be used to improve the low friction and wear resistance simultaneously. In the process of producing coating material, diamond particles pulverized to a nano size tend to agglomerate. To prevent this, silane (silicon coupling agent) treatment was applied. The inorganic functional groups of silane are attached to the nano diamond surface, which keep the diamond particles are apart.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1505
Iku Kosaka, Juan Pablo Leiva, Brian Watson, Phani Adduri, Takanori Ide
A methodology to optimize sound pressure responses of a structure, producing a radiation noise due to structural vibration, is presented. The method involves a finite element analysis module to calculate structural vibration, an optimization module to perform sensitivity analysis and structural optimization, and an acoustic module to compute acoustic transfer vectors. The proposed design system is successfully implemented and is demonstrated in the paper using several example problems.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1724
Juliette Florentin, Francois Durieux, Yukihisa Kuriyama, Toyoki Yamamoto
The present work attempts a complete noise and vibration analysis for an electric vehicle at concept stage. The candidate vehicle is the Future Steel Vehicle (FSV), a lightweight steel body with an electric motor developed by WorldAutoSteel [1,2,3]. Measurements were conducted on two small Mitsubishi vehicles that both share the same body, yet one is equipped with an internal combustion engine and the other with an electric motor. The outcome was used as a starting point to identify assets and pitfalls of electric motor noise and draw a set of Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) targets for FSV. Compared to a combustion engine, the electric motor shows significantly lower sound pressure levels, except for an isolated high frequency peak heard at high speeds (3500 Hz when the vehicle drives at top speed). The prominence of this peak is lowered by increased use of acoustic absorbent materials in the motor compartment.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1693
Luca Guj, Theophane Courtois, Claudio Bertolini
Typically, in the automotive industry, the design of the body damping treatment package with respect to NVH targets is carried out in such a way to achieve panel mobility targets, within given weight and cost constraints. Vibration mobility reduction can be efficiently achieved thanks to dedicated CAE FE tools, which can take into account the properties of damping composites, and also, which can provide their optimal location on the body structure, for a minimal added mass and a maximized efficiency. This need has led to the development of different numerical design and optimization strategies, all based on the modeling of the damping composites by mean of equivalent shell representations, which is a versatile solution for the full vehicle simulation with various damping layouts.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1696
Nickolas Vlahopoulos, Ricardo Sbragio, Aimin Wang
Stiffened panels are encountered in many engineering systems since the stiffeners comprise the mechanism which provides support and rigidity to the panel's skin. Either a mechanical excitation or an acoustic load can be applied on a stiffened panel creating vibration that is transmitted in all panel components. Mechanical excitation tends to be localized in nature, originating from operating machinery mounted on the panel, while the acoustic excitation tends to be distributed over the entire panel, since it typically originates from an external acoustic source which creates an acoustic field impinging on the entire panel. In the Energy Finite Element Analysis (EFEA) various degrees of fidelity are possible when modeling the response of a stiffened panel. In this paper, the theoretical background and the corresponding implications associated with each alternative modeling approach are presented first.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1697
Fumiyasu Kuratani, Kazuhei Matsubara, Takashi Yamauchi
In this paper, we focus on the ACM2 (Area Contact Model 2) model as a simplified spot weld model suitable for vibration analysis and reveal its dynamic characteristics. First, the theoretical background of the multi-point constraint (MPC) used in the ACM2 model is explained. Next, we examine in detail the effect of the mesh pattern surrounding a spot weld on the modal properties (natural frequency and mode shape) of a spot welded structure. Finally, an appropriate mesh size in the area of the spot weld for the ACM2 model is presented. As an example, we used two steel plates joined by three spot welds. The results show that the configuration and size of the patch (group of shell elements in the ACM2 model) significantly affect the modal properties of the model. When the centers of the patch and the solid element that represent the spot weld are coincident, the natural frequencies monotonically increase with the patch size.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1689
Jose Javier Bayod
This paper presents new results regarding damping of structural vibrations using the elastic wedge method. An elastic wedge is a plate, or a rod, whose thickness decreases smoothly towards zero. Flexural vibration energy accumulates at the thinner edge and thus, effective damping can be easily achieved. The method has been proposed to reduce flexural vibrations of structures in the high frequency range, like vibration of turbine blades. In this research, the application of the elastic wedge method to reduce structural vibration in low frequency ranges is investigated using FEM. The structure under analysis is a heavy machinery bed structure. Two rod elastic wedges are attached to that bed. The target frequency range to be damped is between 150 and 250Hz. The results show that the elastic wedge method can effectively reduce the structural vibration of the bed in the target frequency range.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1722
Lu shouwei, Feng huihua, Shang jiao, Zuo zhengxing
A coupled vibro-acoustic of a compressor modeling process was demonstrated for predicting the acoustic radiation from a vibrating compressor structure based on dynamic response data. FEM based modal analysis of the compressor was performed and the result was compared with experimental data, for the purpose of validating the FE model. Modal based force response analysis was conducted to calculate the compressor's surface vibration velocity on radiating structure, using the load which caused by mechanical excitation as input data. In addition, due to the coolant had oscillating gas pressure, the gas pulsed load was also considered during the dynamic response analysis. The surface vibration velocity solution of the compressor provided the necessary boundary condition input into a finite element/boundary element acoustic code for predicting acoustic radiation.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1710
Diego d'Udekem, Masatake Saitoh, Benoit Van den Nieuwenhof, Takashi Yamamoto
During the acceleration of a vehicle, the contribution of the exhaust noise to the interior sound pressure level is significant. The acoustic insulation brought by the trim components must be designed with that consideration in mind. As such, there is an increasing need for developing reliable methods for predicting the airborne noise transmission between the exhaust system and the sound pressure level at the passenger's ears, taking into account the positive impact of various trim components. This paper presents a methodology that has been developed for addressing this need. Based on a finite/infinite element method, the computational procedure is divided in two steps: 1 The first step involves the exterior acoustic field all around the vehicle.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-2111
Nobuo Ushioda, Yasuhiro Ogasawara
Fuel economy is one of the most essential performance requirements for Passenger Car Motor Oil because of fuel economy regulations in many countries and increasing fuel prices. The ILSAC GF-5 specification was issued on December 22, 2009 and requires better fuel economy performance based on the Sequence VID (Seq. VID) Test and higher weighted piston deposit merits based on the Sequence IIIG Test, compared to the ILSAC GF-4 specification. Fuel economy performance is affected by viscosity, friction modification and the lubricant additive chemistries. However, fuel economy engine tests under combustion mode introduce high variability into a fuel economy measurement. Screening by bench testing is complicated by the difficulty to reproduce friction conditions of all of engine parts. A motored friction torque test using an engine is one of the better solutions for fuel economy screening.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2113
Masataka Hashimoto, Tadanori Azuma, Morio Sumimoto, Kanji Mitsuda
A new type of lube oil cleaning system is successfully developed for semi-permanent use of oil by always keeping oil clean with the result of no oil change and no waste oil. It is in practical use in many marine diesel engines and in some other fields. In recent years, possibility of semi-permanent use of engines themselves has been expected based on the field data. A ship test for 7 years has verified the expected semi-permanent use of engines with almost no wear and constant thermal efficiency during the test. We present the characteristics of the oil cleaning system and the result of the test. Also, a new type of fuel oil cleaning system is presented which is useful for cleaning low quality fuel oil. As a whole, this test is the beginning of the new stage of our work following the semi-permanent use of lube oil, which has been verified and established in many diesel engines since the 1980s.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-2114
Jai G. Bansal, Patrick Colby, Maryann Devine, Jack Emert, Kaustav Sinha
This paper is first in a series of papers designed to investigate wear processes in modern heavy duty diesel engines. The objective of the series is to discuss the effects that engine drive cycle, lubricant formulations and in-service ageing of lubricants have on wear of critical engine components. In this paper, the Radioactive Tracer Technology technique was used to study the steady state wear behavior of a number of contacting surfaces in a Caterpillar 1P engine, as a function of the drive cycle. A test protocol consisting of 7 modes or stages was used to simulate a variety of drive cycles. The results from this work provide useful insights into the wear behavior of these surfaces under a variety of speed and load conditions.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2110
Farzan Parsinejad, Wilton Biggs
The delicate balance between global supply and demand for energy, in conjunction with environmental concerns related to burning fossil fuels, have resulted in vehicle designs that stress higher fuel economy. Among new engine designs is Direct Injection Spark Ignition, or DISI, which employs a more precise fuel metering system and is designed for combustion at higher compression ratios than Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. As a result, the performance of DISI engines can easily be altered by the presence of carbonaceous deposits on intake valves and in the combustion chamber. In this study, the characteristics of these deposits have been investigated using elemental and thermal analytical techniques. Deposits from intake valves and combustion chambers have been collected from various DISI engines (both older and more modern ones).
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2030
Takuji Murayama
The continuously variable transmission (CVT) with a rubber belt used in scooters is also regarded as a potential automatic transmission mechanism for conventional motorcycles. By making this system more compact and building it into the engine, a motorcycle CVT engine has been developed that is about the same size as a manual transmission (MT) engine. During driving with a CVT, heat is generated by friction at the sheaves, and therefore it was necessary to secure a certain length of belt to ensure that external air flows efficiently to the sheaves. However, making the CVT more compact restricted the belt length, which decreased cooling performance and increased the number of bends in the belt, making it difficult to maintain durability. To address this issue, a plastic resin drive belt and newly designed sheaves were adopted, and durability of more than that of a scooter was achieved.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 41921

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