Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 3157
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0211
Jan A. van Deventer, Andrey Kruglyak, Johan Nordlander, Jerker Delsing
This paper presents and demonstrates a paradigm to implement automotive systems based on their specifications in a manner that is platform independent. The advantage is to have the same software used in simulation as on different types of micro-controller in a vehicle as well as to ease the integration of different systems. The paradigm is to model the system's components as reactive objects and to use the Timber kernel to schedule their (re)actions. The demonstration is done by developing an anti-lock braking system within the simulation software CarSim and Simulink, which is then evaluated on a braking maneuver over a surface with different coefficient of adhesion from side to side (split mu).
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0054
Brian Ginther, Dirk Fleischer, John S. Mills
The Controls and Software Engineering Team at BorgWarner Drivetrain Systems has successfully employed model-based software development for the past several years. Their drivetrain system control software, developed using MATLAB/Simulink/Stateflow, and autocoded using TargetLink, is on the road in many passenger vehicle applications. Using these tools, BorgWarner has realized the widely recognized benefits of model-based design; such as increased speed to market, improved quality, and reduced complexity. Validating algorithms early through simulation and rapid prototyping, then translating them to production software through automatic code generation has proven very successful for BorgWarner. When starting with model-based design, the BorgWarner team focused on developing the core application control algorithms in the modeling environment. Lower-level software such as I/O drivers, the task scheduler, and communication logic was still hand-coded.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0055
Venkatapathi Nallapa, Fazal Syed, Jeremy Russell, Adam Banker, David Hoadley, Marko Sinistaj
Custom functions are widely used in real-time embedded automotive applications to conserve scarce processor resources. Typical examples include mathematical functions, filtering routines and lookup tables. The custom routines are very efficient and have been in production for many years [ 1 ]. These hand-crafted functions can be reused in new control algorithm designs being developed using Model Based Design (MBD) tools. The next generation of vehicle control software may contain a mix of both automatically generated software and manually developed code. At Ford Motor Company, the code is automatically generated from control algorithm models that are developed using The MathWorks tool chain. Depending on the project-specific needs, the control algorithm models are automatically translated to efficient C code using either The Math Works Real-Time Workshop Embedded Coder (RTW-EC) or dSPACE TargetLink production code generators.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0651
Joshua Pryor, Matt Pierce, Eric Fremond, Yanick Michou
This paper presents the efforts done by Volvo 3P, through a partnership with ThermoAnalytics Inc, to develop transient thermal simulation methodologies of the under hood of a truck. The verification process for the hot spots analysis currently in use at Volvo 3P is described and the key transient situations for the hot spots analysis are identified: hot shutdown, DPF regeneration and long drive cycle, are currently only covered by physical testing late in the project, contrary to steady-state operating conditions that are already managed through simulations in the early stage of the development phase. The goal of this work is to develop simulation methodologies for these transient situations which are likely to increase the efficiency of the verification process. The key issues to be satisfied are to minimize the model development and the simulation times while achieving an acceptable accuracy level.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0517
Kevin Baughey
Mechatronics development continues to be a challenge for automotive OEM's and suppliers. Multi-disciplinary collaboration and development is critical, especially as architectures and solutions evolve in the automotive industry to satisfy changing needs of the customer and environment. New approaches to mobility, sustainment, and infotainment create the need for new combinations of electrical, software, mechanical, and chemical know-how. Whereas most frameworks for requirements-driven model-based design support a single discipline, what is really needed is a framework for requirements-driven model- based design that can capture the multi-disciplinary architecture of the vehicle or system. This would and allow development organizations to then further decompose the objects in support of further refinement and validation.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0519
Jan Klemmer, Johannes Lauer, Volker Formanski, Remy Fontaine, Peter Kilian, Stefan Sinsel, Andreas Erbes, Jochen Zäpf
Dynamic system simulation has gained an important role in automotive engineering since powertrains and power management systems are getting more and more complex. The goal is to establish dynamic system simulation as an integral part of the vehicle development process for the purpose of saving development time, improving subsystem and component specifications, and reducing of development cost. A crucial prerequisite for this approach is that the model quality has been identified for the utilized vehicle simulation models. It determines the applicability of the simulation results since the reliability of simulation results cannot be judged without an identified model quality. The identification of model qualities requires an established and standardized verification and validation process adapted to dynamic vehicle simulation, which is introduced in this paper.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-0525
Byron Mason, M Ebrahimi
Due to the increasing complexity of modern systems, demands for a reduced time to market, lower costs and more rapid product evolution use is made of simulation methods in engineering development. An executable dynamic simulation model may be used to define a complex system from which engineers can observe system behavior and make decisions based on better quality information thus coordinating development efforts more effectively. This work presents two models, both real time capable; a test cell model and a vehicle and driver model with a well defined architecture that helps facilitate Simulation Based Development (SBD) efforts relating to powertrain and drivetrain development. The models are created with a well defined architecture (Flexible Architecture for Simulation Based Development) and run (simulated) through the NEDC and US06 drive cycles.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-0530
Mohamed El-Sayed
Virtual Simulations tools are extensively utilized by many industries today in product development processes. In auto industry, however, this utilization has not reached its full potential. So far virtual simulations have been playing a supporting role in traditional product development processes founded on physical builds. To reach the full potential of virtual simulation, in reducing the product development time and costs, a paradigm shift in the product development processes and the role of both physical and virtual simulations is need. For an integrated realization process, innovation, analysis, integration, and continuous correlations are necessary design practices for achieving the desired product attributes. This paper, discusses the expansion of the virtual simulation role in an integrated product realization process to reshape the traditional product development process.
2013-05-13
Technical Paper
2013-01-1971
Giovanni Rinaldi, Gabriella Cerrato
The role of NVH test development has changed from addressing a system-level NV concern late in the design cycle (firefighting) to having well established NV optimized test procedures in place. One way this is achieved is by leveraging the information gained during troubleshooting of current product to improve the future product development process for noise and vibration. Today, most NV groups/laboratories use optimized test procedures for creating accurate, consistent, and efficient test results. This still requires expertise to post-process data, compute targets and interpret results to guide product development. This step is often overlooked and, in recent years, due to the lack of NV expertise of “younger” labs (typically in non-automotive industries) or of more established labs affected by the economic downturn (early retirements, lay-offs, especially in the automotive industry) there has been a growing need for automated post-processing “intelligent” procedures.
2013-05-13
Technical Paper
2013-01-1994
Chadwyck Musser, Melzak Marques da Silva, Paulo Sérgio Lima Alves
For purposes of reducing development time, cost and risk, the majority of new vehicles are derived strongly or at least generally from a surrogate vehicle, often of the same general size or body style. Previous test data and lessons learned can be applied as a starting point for design of the new vehicle, especially at early phases of the design before definite design decisions have been finalized and before prototype of production test hardware is available. This is true as well of vehicle NVH development where most new vehicles being developed are variants of existing vehicles for which the main noise transfer paths from sources of interest are already understood via test results and existing targets. The NVH targets for new vehicles are defined via benchmarking, market considerations, and other higher-level decisions. The objective is then to bridge the gap between test data from surrogate vehicles to direct support of the NVH development of new vehicle programs.
2013-05-13
Technical Paper
2013-01-1979
Edward Ray Green, Richard Brouckaert, Mike Campbell, Warner Frazer
A project is described where spherical beam-forming was used to perform real time evaluation and development of an automotive dash silencer assembly. By eliminating the iterative laboratory sound transmission loss testing, significant advantages were achieved in part development. These advantages include a reduction in development cost and time, reduced part cost, and lower part mass. Reducing the time to develop lighter and less expensive sound package parts was the most obvious benefit of the project, but the process also: 1) eliminated the time and cost to procure competitive parts; 2) allowed the evaluation of the parts in-vehicle rather than on a laboratory buck; and 3) reduced the time required with the development vehicle.
2013-05-13
Technical Paper
2013-01-1980
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Dean Tomazic, Georg Eisele, Peter Genender
The definition of vehicle and powertrain level targets is one of the first tasks toward establishing where a vehicle will reside with respect to the current or future state of industry. Though development of sound quality metrics is ongoing to better correlate objective data with subjective assessments, target setting at the vehicle level is relatively straightforward. However, realization of these targets depends on effective cascading to system and component levels. Often, component level targets are derived based on experience from earlier development programs, or based on selected characteristics observed during component level benchmarking. An approach is presented here to complement current strategies for component level target definition. This approach involves a systematic concept for definition of component NVH targets based on desired vehicle level performance and a consequent target break down.
2013-05-13
Technical Paper
2013-01-1983
Seonghyeon Kim, Dong Chul Park, Seokgwan Hong, Philipp Sellerbeck, Andre Fiebig, Michael Csakan, Chahe Apelian
The sound sources of modern road vehicle can be classified into three components, driving sound (sound generated through normal driving patterns and events), operating sound (sound generated through actuated components not related to driving), and generated synthetic sound (electronic warning / interactive feedback). The characteristic features of these sounds are dependent upon customer expectation and usage requirements. Additional development complexities are introduced due to each market's cultural and regional differences. These differences in preference must be considered for the establishment of the target sound quality in the early vehicle development process. In this paper, a sound quality goal setting procedure based on user preference is introduced. The sound targets are created as a result of the user preference investigation and validated by intercultural comparison.
2013-05-13
Technical Paper
2013-01-1984
Santhosha Nayak, Debasish Chatterjee
With today's growing focus on noise control issues and the emergence of sound quality as an important aspect of product design, usage of sound package materials has been playing a vital role in the design, manufacturing and validation of vehicles including automobiles, multipurpose vehicles, and commercial vehicles. This paper discusses about the NVH development process in the Indian automotive market. This involves typical NVH solutions, Government norms, benchmarking, target setting, target cascading, simulation methods, test standards and methods, and design optimization. It also explores the relevance and timing of material, component, and full system level of testing and analyses. The manufacturing process involves prototyping, trials, and validation. The paper discusses that the profitability and the performance of the NVH product can be optimized by managing the above-mentioned NVH activities. The future trends in the NVH markets are also discussed.
2013-04-08
Journal Article
2013-01-1329
Mohamed El-Sayed
Lean applications in product development usually start with manufacturing due to the relative experience of measuring improvements and identifying wastes in physical settings. The full potential of lean implementation in any product development, however, can only be realized when applied throughout the process, starting with early process. Considering that the first and most essential principle in lean implementation is the characterization of value from the customer's perspective, it is imperative that the proper definition of value is realized at the beginning of the process. In addition, streaming and flowing of this customer's specified value should be realized throughout the process from start to finish. This paper discusses the application of lean principles to integrated design and manufacturing phases of the Product Development Process.
2014-01-15
Journal Article
2013-01-9093
Rodrigo Mayer de Ávila, Milton Borsato
Facing a competitive and globalized market and with increasingly demanding customers, companies must constantly seek the development of practices in the development of new products. One of the current practices is the adoption of modularity. In that sense, the objective of this paper is to conduct an analysis of this practice in a Brazilian company, which manufactures agricultural machinery. The applicability of modular design in current products is focused. Therefore, a case study approach has been chosen. First, a review of the scientific literature was conducted, followed by field research, for collecting data based on interviews with product engineers and technical documentation. The case study shows the applicability of the modular design concept in a combine header, by increasing the number of repeated components. The modular header approach facilitates the implementation of engineering changes and allows greater standardization of components.
2013-09-24
Technical Paper
2013-01-2360
G. Balaji, Ashwini Agarwal, Mahesh Mungi, Ranjit Babar, Vidyadhar Katkar PE
In automotive design and development, there are different stages for product design. In this fast changing scenario product design, digital verification of design (CAE), physical validation of the product and launching of the same in short time is important in product development life cycle of any new generation vehicle. This paper proposes a new approach towards development of a green-field platform for commercial vehicles by improving reliability of CAE and thereby reducing the need for prototype testing and hence shortening development cycle and costs - we call it “Hybrid Mule”. This Hybrid Mule has complete design intent under-body and engine-house while upper-body is made of simple representative tubular space frame. FRP skin panels are attached to this space frame to create a safe environment for test-driver. FRP skin also provides early feel of styling in running condition and evaluates basic ergonomics and visibility.
2013-04-08
Technical Paper
2013-01-0475
Alan Warburton, Dave Mossop, Ben Burslem, Pratap Rama, Paul Adcock, Jon Cole, James Edwards, Daniel Ninan, Michael Provost
As part of its technology portfolio, Intelligent Energy has developed a proprietary fuel cell stack, cooled via evaporation rather than by use of separate cooling channels. This paper documents the development status of the Intelligent Energy Evaporatively Cooled (EC) Hydrogen Fuel Cell. As a case study, the application as a range extender in a conventional London Taxi black cab is discussed. The fuel cell black cab has undergone considerable development since its first exposure to the public in 2010 and is now available for public use, via a fleet of five vehicles in London. The paper documents a number of those improvements, the development process and particular experience during the road trials to date. To complement the hardware development and enable rapid development, a fuel cell system and vehicle model has been developed. Development of this tool along with correlation to the actual vehicle hardware is described.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0197
Brian E. Johnson, Eric J. Olsen
High technology vehicle applications are expanding functionality and connectivity, enabling increased information access, and improving occupant safety. In-vehicle data transmission systems are also evolving to meet the requirements of these applications, which include diverse node locations, an increased number of interacting nodes, information transfer capacity, and data transmission rates. The Yazaki Polymer Clad Silica (PCS) Optical Data Communication System is leading this evolution. This next generation optical communication system integrates gigabit communication technology, including glass fiber and VCSEL light sources. It exceeds current vehicle network system demands, and anticipates future requirements to enable the automotive optical communication networks of tomorrow.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0575
Daxing Wang, Xin Zhang
In this paper the hardware of PCU based on digital signal processor (DSP) is developed and the software of PCU control with a nested structure is created. The control algorithm is programmed in C language, and the signal collection and communication are realized by assembly language with a high system performance. The electromagnetic interference in PHEV is serious, so the hardware and software anti-interference treatments for the PCU are studied in this paper. Besides, the hardware in the loop simulation system (HILSS) is set up and used as a main test instrument to check the PCU's performance. Also the simulation results of PCU control are shown in this paper.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0571
Miguel M. Gomez, Victor H. Mucino, Nigel Clark, James E. Smith
Continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) are usually used in small vehicles due to power limitations on the variable elements. Continuously variable power-split transmissions (CVPST) were developed in order to reduce the fraction of power passing through the variable elements [1,2]. The configuration presented in this paper includes a planetary gear train (PGT), which in combination with the CVT allows the power to be split and therefore increase the power envelope of the system. The PGT also provides a branch that can be used in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) operation through an electric motor. A conceptual design of a CVPST for a HEV is presented in this paper. The objectives are to show the different operational modes, with diagrams, perform a power analysis, develop the velocity and force equations and finally show the performance of the system with an example application.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0567
Hiroyuki Satoh, Shigemitsu Akutsu, Tomoya Miyamura, Hiroaki Shinoki
This motor adopted a salient pole type surface permanent magnet rotor, which enables it both to produce reluctance torque and to minimize the use of magnets. The inductance value is set at the limit value enabling output at the maximum rotor speed, which suppresses field-weakening current. The utilization of the magnets enables continuous operation at the maximum rotor speed by suppressing eddy current loss by means of magnet surface insulation and magnet segmentation. Strength reliability at high rotor speeds has been assured by applying the Weibull-theory as a method of evaluating the strength of magnets.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0360
Thierry Rolina
Software content is undoubtedly increasing in vehicles with more and more functionality being implemented as real-time embedded features. This paper reviews the traditional approach to implementing such features, discusses the challenges that approach poses and describes a better method to overcome them. We will explore the components of a “building blocks” approach, which will constitute the basis of a process for future real-time automotive embedded software development.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0363
Gary Rushton, Amy Wesley, Armen Zakarian, Tigran Grigoryan
Not all software tools are created equal and not all software tools are created to perform the same tasks. Therefore, different software tools are used to perform different tasks. However, being able to share the information between the different software tools, without having to manually re-enter (duplicate) any of the information, can save a lot of time and improve the quality of the product. The control software interface presented in this paper, allows system engineers to exchange data between software tools in an efficient manner which maximizes each tools capabilities and ultimately reduces development time and improves the quality of the product.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0370
Arthur L. Richards, Vivek D. Bhise
Programmable vehicle models (PVMs) are intended to save time and costs in building bucks to evaluate vehicle interior packages. This paper presents results from a series of three studies conducted to determine the applicability and limitations of the methodology of using a PVM. The PVM used for the study was built by Prefix Corporation and has forty-two axes of adjustments. The first study verified the PVM's ability to reproduce dimensions. It showed that the PVM was acceptably accurate, with most dimension measurement ranges less than 2-3 mm. The second study was conducted to determine if subject responses are reliable indicators of package differences. Aside from some special causes, most were found to be. The third study was conducted to determine how well the PVM replicated 3 actual vehicles. Despite some dimensional discrepancies, there was evidence of correlation between subject responses from the PVM and actual vehicles.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-0395
Venkatesh Kannan, John Seifert, Tony Golletti, Dave Hanner
An intake manifold produced a distinct whistle noise in a vehicle while driving through high torque conditions. The diagnostic tests in a steady air flow test bench helped reveal that the whistle was occurring due to the shear layer instabilities in the air flow over the sump cavity in the intake manifold which acts as an Helmoltz-like resonator. Joint time-frequency domain signal analysis was applied to detect the peak whistle. A sharp radius and a ramp at the upstream edge of the sump cavity reduced the peak whistle sound pressure level from 106dB to 85dB in the air flow bench and made the whistle inaudible in the vehicle. Tolerance study was performed on this geometry to allow manufacturing variations. A test method, using rapid prototype parts, has been developed in order to identify whistles early in the design cycle.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1585
Raj G. Iyer
Technical Data Packages (TDP) contain engineering information that can be used throughout the extended enterprise at all stages of the product lifecycle. In an e-business supply chain environment it is necessary for the prime contractor and the suppliers to exchange and collaborate on TDPs efficiently to reduce the cost of manufacturing and procuring parts. Typically the contractor and the supplier use different Product Data Management (PDM) systems making the exchange of TDPs between the systems inefficient and difficult. This paper discusses a flexible standards-based architecture to exchange a TDP between PDM systems in a supply chain.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1580
Frank Philpott, Rick Laske, Francois Montfort
Goodyear and Michelin formed a joint venture in June of 2000 to develop run flat technology and accelerate the introduction of innovative tire systems. With the run flat segment of the tire market on the verge of rapid growth, potentially involving a number of varied technical approaches, the need for global standards was soon recognized. The joint venture has taken the lead in the effort to establish the standards. The paper gives background on run flat tires and contrasts the widely varying service requirements in different parts of the world. Both vehicle manufacturers and consumers will benefit from these new tire system standards.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1447
Masakazu Yamazaki, Atsushi Takai, Osamu Murakami, Mitsuhiko Kawabata, Hitoshi Tanikawa, Osami Ito, Koichi Kuroki
A high-strength aluminum cylinder block manufactured using a new production process, ASCT (Advanced Semisolid Casting Technology) has been adopted for the newly developed 2.2L 4-cylinder i-CTDi (Intelligent Common rail Turbo Diesel Injection) diesel engine fitted in the new Accord to be marketed in Europe. In the production process, a semisolid aluminum is used during high-pressure die-casting. In addition, newly developed pressure resistant sand cores are used to mold the closed deck. Heat treatment is conducted to ensure a high level of materials strength. To respond to the high load on the crankshaft journal, die-cast aluminum lower block with cast iron bearing caps inserts are employed. Adopting the dummy head honing to reduce bore deformation and offset cylinders have enabled the achievement a lightweight and compact cylinder configuration matched to the high combustion pressure of the latest diesel engines, while maintaining a high level of quietness.
2004-03-08
Technical Paper
2004-01-1477
Zoran Filipi, Loucas Louca, Anna Stefanopoulou, Jay Pukrushpan, Burit Kittirungsi, Huei Peng
This paper investigates the opportunities for improving truck fuel economy through the use of a Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Unit (FC APU) for silent watch, as well as for powering electrified engine accessories during driving. The particular vehicle selected as the platform for this study is a prototype of the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) capable of carrying a 5 ton payload. Peak stand-by power requirements for on-board power are determined from the projected future digitized battlefield vehicle requirements. Strategic selection of electrified engine accessories enables engine shutdowns when the vehicle is stopped, thus providing additional fuel savings. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is integrated with a partial oxidation reformer in order to allow the use of the same fuel (JP8) as for the propulsion diesel engine.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3157

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: