Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 44780
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1621
Frank Friedrich
While the microcellular urethane is widely known in the automotive industry for its use in jounce bumpers, its use in Noise Vibration Harshness (NVH) applications is often not as well recognized. Even though there are some NVH parts in the market, rubber still dominates it. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the material properties of MCU and their relevance for NVH applications in chassis and suspension components. It will also demonstrate the importance of package design to suit the use of the MCU material. This is especially important to not only achieve the best performance but also keep overall cost and weight under control. Several application types will be introduced with general design suggestions. A detailed design guideline for these applications is not part of this paper. Each application has a large variety of parameters to be considered in the design. They need to be selectively applied based on customer performance targets.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1623
Alan V. Parrett, Chong Wang, Xiandi Zeng, David Nielubowicz, Mark Snowden, Jonathon H. Alexander, Ronald Gerdes, Bill Leeder, Charles Zupan
In recent years several variants of lightweight multi-layered acoustic treatments have been used successfully in vehicles to replace conventional barrier-decoupler interior dash mats. The principle involved is to utilize increased acoustic absorption to offset the decrease in insertion loss from the reduced mass such that equivalent vehicle level performance can be achieved. Typical dual density fibrous constructions consist of a relatively dense cap layer on top of a lofted layer. The density and flow resistivity of these layers are tuned to optimize a balance of insertion loss and absorption performance. Generally these have been found to be very effective with the exception of dash mats with very high insertion loss requirements. This paper describes an alternative treatment which consists of a micro-perforated film top layer and fibrous decoupler layer.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1628
Hejie Lin, Turgay Bengisu, Zissimos Mourelatos
Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR), a copolymer of butadiene and styrene, is widely used in the automotive industry due to its high durability and resistance to abrasion, oils and oxidation. Some of the common applications include tires, vibration isolators, and gaskets, among others. This paper characterizes the dynamic behavior of SBR and discusses the suitability of a visco-elastic model of elastomers, known as the Kelvin model, from a mathematical and physical point of view. An optimization algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the Kelvin model. The resulting model was shown to produce reasonable approximations of measured dynamic stiffness. The model was also used to calculate the self heating of the elastomer due to energy dissipation by the viscous damping components in the model. Developing such a predictive capability is essential in understanding the dynamic behavior of elastomers considering that their dynamic stiffness can in general depend on temperature.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1629
Saurabh Suresh, Jeff Kastner, Teik Lim
Reduction of noise transmitted through laminated glass with interlayer is of interest to vehicle applications. Altering the structure of the interlayer can impact sound transmission loss particularly at the coincidence frequency. This study investigates the feasibility of including a porous layer within the laminated glass to act as an acoustic damper. To understand the underlying physics controlling transmission loss in laminated glass design, an approach utilizing transfer matrices is used for modeling each layer in the laminated glass. These transfer matrices are used to relate the acoustic characteristics of two points within a layer. For any two layers in contact, an interface matrix is defined that relates the acoustic fields of the layers depending on their individual characteristics. The solid layer is modeled as an elastic element and the sound propagation through the porous materials is described using the Biot theory.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1632
Ion Pelinescu, Andrew Christie
One of the most effective NVH solutions used in the automotive industry to reduce structure-borne noise is to apply vibration damping treatments to the vehicle structure. These damping treatments need to meet increasing weight reduction targets, while offering the same or better damping properties. While Liquid Applied Structural Dampers (LASD) are now delivering high damping performance at lower densities, traditional damping measuring techniques are falling short in describing the performance of these extensional layers when applied onto more realistic test samples or real structures. This paper discusses the damping performance of LASD technology, in particular the newer generations of acrylic-based waterborne LASD materials, which through improvements in polymer architecture are achieving increased damping efficiencies together with reduced density.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1624
Prasanth B, Sachin Wagh, David Hudson
Baffle plates with heat reactive expandable foam sealants have increasingly found their applications in automotives. They are used to separate body cavities and to impede noise, water and dust propagation inside of body cavities, thus control noise intrusion into the passenger compartment. Use of these sealant materials has grown significantly as the demands to improve vehicle acoustic performance has increased. Traditionally quantification of the acoustic performance of expandable baffle samples involved making separate vehicles with and without expandable baffles and measure the incab noise to know the effect. The absolute acoustic evaluation of the baffles is very difficult as number of other vehicle parameters is also responsible for vehicle incab noise. Also, it is a time consuming and a costly method to evaluate.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1625
John G. Cherng, Qian Xi, Pravansu Mohanty, Gordon Ebbitt
Acoustical materials are widely used in automotive vehicles and other industrial applications. Two important parameters namely Sound Transmission Loss (STL) and absorption coefficient are commonly used to evaluate the acoustical performance of these materials. Other parameters, such as insertion loss, noise reduction, and loss factors are also used to judge their performance depending on the application of these materials. A systematic comparative study of STL and absorption coefficient was conducted on various porous acoustical materials. Several dozen materials including needled cotton fiber (shoddy) and foam materials with or without barrier/scrim were investigated. The results of STL and absorption coefficient are presented and compared. As expected, it was found that most of materials are either good in STL or good in absorption. However, some combinations can achieve a balance of performance in both categories.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1626
Jonathan Alexander, David Reed, Ronald Gerdes
Flat, constant thickness composites that consisted of a microperforated top layer plus a fibrous decoupler layer were tested for random absorption and transmission loss (TL) performance. The top, microperforated layer consisted of a relatively thick film that contained small, precise micro-perforations. For reference, top layers that consisted of a resistive scrim and an impervious film were also included in this study. Two fibrous materials of constant thickness were used for the decoupler layer between a steel panel and the top microperforated film. The composites' absorption and TL performance were also modeled using the well-known transfer matrix method. This method has been implemented in a commercially available statistical energy analysis (SEA) software package. A comparison of testing and modeling results showed reasonable agreement for absorption results and even better agreement for transmission loss and insertion loss results.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1627
J. Liu, D. W. Herrin
Microperforated panel (MPP) absorbers are rugged, non-combustible, and do not deteriorate over time. That being the case, they are especially suitable for long term use in harsh environments. However, the acoustic performance is modified when contaminated by dust, dirt, or fluids (i.e. oil, water). This paper examines that effect experimentally and correlates the absorption performance with Maa's theory for micro-perforated panels. Transfer impedance and absorption coefficient are measured for different levels of aluminum oxide and carbon dust accumulation. The amount of dust contamination is quantified by measuring the luminance difference between clean and dirty panels with a light meter. The porosity and hole diameter in Maa's equation are modified to account for dust obstruction. The effect of coating the MPP with oil, water, and other appropriate viscous fluids was also measured. This effect was simulated by modifying the viscous factor in Maa's equation.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1634
Michael Dinsmore, Richard Bliton, Scott Perz
Using advanced, multi-layer poro-elastic acoustical material modeling technologies, an example of acoustical performance optimization of an underhood sound absorber application is presented. In this case, a porous facing in combination with a fibrous sound absorber pad is optimized for maximum efficiency, which allows for dramatic reduction in pad density and weight. Overall sound absorption performance is shown to be equal or improved versus frequency relative to the incumbent design.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1637
Ahad Khezerloo, Amin owhadi Esfahani PhD, Sina Jalily lng
One of important problems in railway transportation systems is control of noise and vibration. Metal foams are very good medias for absorbing noise. So in this paper, noise of motion of a train is simulated by MATLAB software and the reduction of noise level in a compartment of passenger car that is equipped by metal foam sheets is considered. Commonly, the sound absorption coefficients are obtained experimentally and they are available in datasheets and references. The different parameters that influence on the capability of this equipment were considered. For example the microstructure, thickness, magnitude of compaction, relative density and etc of metal foam is effective parameters. High porosity has good effect on the performance of absorber sheet. By increasing of compaction ratio, in frequency domain we will have enhancing of absorption of the noise. Compaction process is done by two different ways: one is direct and else is progressively.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1575
John David Fieldhouse, David Bryant, Chris John Talbot
Thermo-elastic and thermo-plastic behaviour takes place with a disc brake during heavy braking and it is this aspect of braking that this paper considers. The work is concerned with working towards developing design advice that provides uniform heating of the disc, and equally important, even dissipation of heat from the disc blade. The material presented emanates from a combination of modeling, on-vehicle testing but mainly laboratory observations and subsequent investigations. The experimental work makes use of a purpose built high speed brake dynamometer which incorporates the full vehicle suspension for controlled simulation of the brake and vehicle operating conditions. Advanced instrumentation allows dynamic measurement of brake pressure fluctuations, disc surface temperature and discrete vibration measurements.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1385
Yi Ren, Xianguo Li
The importance of using biodiesel as an alternative in diesel engines has been demonstrated previously. A reduction in the soot, CO and HC emissions and an increase in the NO emission burning biodiesel fuels were reported consistently in previous technical papers. However, a widely accepted NO formation mechanism for biodiesel-fueled engines is currently lacking. As a result, in past multi-dimensional simulation studies, the NO emission of biodiesel combustion was predicted unsatisfactorily. In this study, the interaction between the soot and NO formations is considered during the prediction of the soot and NO emissions in a biodiesel-fueled engine. Meanwhile, a three-step soot model and an eight NO model which includes both the thermal NO mechanism and prompt mechanism are implemented.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1381
Ezio Mancaruso, Luigi Sequino, Bianca Maria Vaglieco, Claudio Ciaravino, Alberto Vassallo
The present paper describes the results of a cooperative research project between GM Powertrain Europe and Istituto Motori - CNR aimed at studying the impact of both fresh and highly oxidized RME at two levels of blending on spray formation and combustion in modern automotive diesel engines. The tests were performed on an optical single-cylinder engine sharing combustion system configuration with the 2.0L Euro5 GM diesel engine for passenger car application. Two blends (B50 and B100) blending were tested for both fresh and aged RME and compared with commercial diesel fuel in two different operating points typical of NEDC (1500rpm/2bar BMEP and 2000rpm/5bar BMEP). The experimental activity was devoted to an in-depth investigation of the spray density, breakup and penetration, mixture formation, combustion and soot formation, by means of optical techniques.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1391
Philipp Adomeit, Markus Jakob, Andreas Kolbeck, Stefan Pischinger
The requirement of reducing worldwide CO₂ emissions and engine pollutants are demanding an increased use of bio-fuels. Ethanol with its established production technology can contribute to this goal. However, due to its resistive auto-ignition behavior the use of ethanol-based fuels is limited to the spark-ignited gasoline combustion process. For application to the compression-ignited diesel combustion process advanced ignition systems are required. In general, ethanol offers a significant potential to improve the soot emission behavior of the diesel engine due to its oxygen content and its enhanced evaporation behavior. In this contribution the ignition behavior of ethanol and mixtures with high ethanol content is investigated in combination with advanced ignition systems with ceramic glow-plugs under diesel engine relevant thermodynamic conditions in a high pressure and temperature vessel.
2011-04-12
Technical Paper
2011-01-1380
Ji Zhang, Tiegang Fang
This paper investigates the combustion of biodiesel and diesel in an optical accessible constant volume chamber that can simulate the conditions in compression ignition engines. The high-pressure and high-temperature environment in the chamber was generated by a controlled premixed combustion with desired content of oxygen left. A common rail and an injector with 160 degree included angle were used to deliver the fuel. Ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and biodiesel from used cook oil were used in this paper. High speed imaging of natural luminosity from the flame was used to study the combustion flame in a time resolved manner. A combination of high speed and intensified imaging of OH chemiluminescence was employed to identify reaction zones. This method has the advantage of capturing the global pictures, thus allowing the studying of jet-to-jet variations, while it does not sacrifice the time-resolved resolution.
2011-04-12
Journal Article
2011-01-1401
Yoolkoo Kim, Hyundal Park, Jeong Uk An, Tae-Suek Kan, Joonsung Park
Various polymer-based coatings are applied on piston skirt to reduce friction loss between the piston skirt and cylinder bore which is one of main factors of energy loss in an automotive engine system. These coatings generally consist of polymer binder (PAI) and solid lubricants (graphite or MoS₂) for low friction property. On the other hand, the present study found that PTFE as a solid lubricant and nano diamond as hard particles can be used to improve the low friction and wear resistance simultaneously. In the process of producing coating material, diamond particles pulverized to a nano size tend to agglomerate. To prevent this, silane (silicon coupling agent) treatment was applied. The inorganic functional groups of silane are attached to the nano diamond surface, which keep the diamond particles are apart.
2011-05-17
Technical Paper
2011-01-1724
Juliette Florentin, Francois Durieux, Yukihisa Kuriyama, Toyoki Yamamoto
The present work attempts a complete noise and vibration analysis for an electric vehicle at concept stage. The candidate vehicle is the Future Steel Vehicle (FSV), a lightweight steel body with an electric motor developed by WorldAutoSteel [1,2,3]. Measurements were conducted on two small Mitsubishi vehicles that both share the same body, yet one is equipped with an internal combustion engine and the other with an electric motor. The outcome was used as a starting point to identify assets and pitfalls of electric motor noise and draw a set of Noise Vibration and Harshness (NVH) targets for FSV. Compared to a combustion engine, the electric motor shows significantly lower sound pressure levels, except for an isolated high frequency peak heard at high speeds (3500 Hz when the vehicle drives at top speed). The prominence of this peak is lowered by increased use of acoustic absorbent materials in the motor compartment.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-1767
Thananchai Tepimonrat, Kittisak Kamsinla, Ekathai Wirojsakunchai, Tanet Aroonsrisopon, Krisada Wannatong
The current study examined diesel dual fuel (DDF) operations in a four-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine under low load conditions. Experiments were performed to investigate effects of diesel injection timings and exhaust valve timing advance for DDF operations under high levels of natural gas utilization. Results showed that diesel injection timings played an important role in DDF combustion. Increasing the ratio of natural gas to total fuel resulted in greater amounts of HC and CO emissions. Advancing the exhaust valve timing increased the internal EGR, raised the in-cylinder temperature at IVC, and improved the combustion efficiency. To maximize the ratio of natural gas to total fuel, a combination of proper exhaust valve timing advance and a tuned timing of diesel injection should be employed to avoid excessive HC and CO emissions.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-1743
Abhinav Jain, Stuti Agrawal
The burgeoning energy and environmental crisis calls for a pressing need to develop alternative fuels which can replace fossil fuels in the near future. This paper enlists and reviews various vehicle programs based on alternative fuels, focusing mainly on battery electric vehicles (BEVs) and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). Firstly we state prominent vehicle programs undertaken by different manufacturers worldwide in BEVs and FCEVs. This is followed by a comparison of vehicle specifications and features highlighting the evident improvements in their utility that have followed with time. A comprehensive analysis of the observed technological trends in the last two decades has been conducted by us. We discuss the patterns of development in the pivotal areas of BEV technology i.e. the battery and the motor in detail.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-1760
Magnus Sjoberg, John E. Dec
Ethanol and ethanol/gasoline blends are being widely considered as alternative fuels for light-duty automotive applications. At the same time, HCCI combustion has the potential to provide high efficiency and ultra-low exhaust emissions. However, the application of HCCI is typically limited to low and moderate loads because of unacceptably high heat-release rates (HRR) at higher fueling rates. This work investigates the potential of lowering the HCCI HRR at high loads by using partial fuel stratification to increase the in-cylinder thermal stratification. This strategy is based on ethanol's high heat of vaporization combined with its true single-stage ignition characteristics. Using partial fuel stratification, the strong fuel-vaporization cooling produces thermal stratification due to variations in the amount of fuel vaporization in different parts of the combustion chamber.
2011-05-17
Journal Article
2011-01-1693
Luca Guj, Theophane Courtois, Claudio Bertolini
Typically, in the automotive industry, the design of the body damping treatment package with respect to NVH targets is carried out in such a way to achieve panel mobility targets, within given weight and cost constraints. Vibration mobility reduction can be efficiently achieved thanks to dedicated CAE FE tools, which can take into account the properties of damping composites, and also, which can provide their optimal location on the body structure, for a minimal added mass and a maximized efficiency. This need has led to the development of different numerical design and optimization strategies, all based on the modeling of the damping composites by mean of equivalent shell representations, which is a versatile solution for the full vehicle simulation with various damping layouts.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2094
Boonlue Sawatmongkhon, Athanasios Tsolakis, Andrew P. E. York, Kampanart Theinnoi
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used to simulate chemical reactions and transport phenomena occurring in a single channel of a honeycomb-type automotive catalytic converter under lean burn combustion. Microkinetic analysis is adopted to develop a detailed elementary reaction mechanism for propane oxidation on a silver catalyst. Activation energies are calculated based on the theory of the Unity Bond Index-Quadratic Exponential Potential (UBI-QEP) method. The order-of-magnitude of the pre-exponential factors is obtained from Transition State Theory (TST). Sensitivity analysis is applied to identify the important elementary steps and refine the pre-exponential factors of these reactions. These pre-exponential factors depend on inlet temperatures and propane concentration; therefore optimised pre-exponential factors are written in polynomial forms. The results of numerical simulations are validated by comparison with experimental data.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2096
Aaro Kopperoinen, Matti Kyto, Seppo Mikkonen
When a new type of fuel is introduced, it is necessary to ensure that exhaust gas aftertreatment systems work properly with these fuels. Today diesel particulate filter (DPF) is an inherent part of current diesel engine's exhaust gas aftertreatment system due to stringent exhaust emission limits. The functioning of DPF depends on the composition of soot particulates of exhaust gas, whereas the type of soot depends on the fuel used. To avoid clogging, DPF has to be regenerated regularly. This regeneration is usually increasing fuel consumption, so the longer the regeneration interval is, the better is fuel economy. Fuel quality and engine-out particulate emissions are important factors affecting to the need of regeneration. Renewable fuels burn cleanly and produce less particulate emissions than ordinary diesel fuel. Therefore, the increase of exhaust backpressure is slower enabling longer regeneration frequency.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2093
Anirut Noipheng, Napumee Waitayapat, Tanet Aroonsrisopon, Ekathai Wirojsakunchai, Thummarat Thummadetsak, Krisada Wannatong
Towards the effort of using natural gas as an alternative fuel for a diesel engine, the concept of Diesel Dual Fuel (DDF) engine has been shown as a strong candidate. Typically, DDF's engine-out emission species such as soot and nitrogen oxides are decreased while carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are increased. The aftertreatment system is required in order to reduce these pollutant emissions from DDF engines. Additionally, DDF engine exhaust has a wide temperature span and is rich in oxygen, which makes HC emissions, especially methane (CH₄), difficult to treat. Until now, it is widely accepted that the key parameter influencing methane oxidation in a catalytic converter is high exhaust temperature. However, a comprehensive understanding of what variables in real DDF engine exhausts most influencing a catalytic converter performance are yet to be explored.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-2111
Nobuo Ushioda, Yasuhiro Ogasawara
Fuel economy is one of the most essential performance requirements for Passenger Car Motor Oil because of fuel economy regulations in many countries and increasing fuel prices. The ILSAC GF-5 specification was issued on December 22, 2009 and requires better fuel economy performance based on the Sequence VID (Seq. VID) Test and higher weighted piston deposit merits based on the Sequence IIIG Test, compared to the ILSAC GF-4 specification. Fuel economy performance is affected by viscosity, friction modification and the lubricant additive chemistries. However, fuel economy engine tests under combustion mode introduce high variability into a fuel economy measurement. Screening by bench testing is complicated by the difficulty to reproduce friction conditions of all of engine parts. A motored friction torque test using an engine is one of the better solutions for fuel economy screening.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2113
Masataka Hashimoto, Tadanori Azuma, Morio Sumimoto, Kanji Mitsuda
A new type of lube oil cleaning system is successfully developed for semi-permanent use of oil by always keeping oil clean with the result of no oil change and no waste oil. It is in practical use in many marine diesel engines and in some other fields. In recent years, possibility of semi-permanent use of engines themselves has been expected based on the field data. A ship test for 7 years has verified the expected semi-permanent use of engines with almost no wear and constant thermal efficiency during the test. We present the characteristics of the oil cleaning system and the result of the test. Also, a new type of fuel oil cleaning system is presented which is useful for cleaning low quality fuel oil. As a whole, this test is the beginning of the new stage of our work following the semi-permanent use of lube oil, which has been verified and established in many diesel engines since the 1980s.
2011-08-30
Journal Article
2011-01-2114
Jai G. Bansal, Patrick Colby, Maryann Devine, Jack Emert, Kaustav Sinha
This paper is first in a series of papers designed to investigate wear processes in modern heavy duty diesel engines. The objective of the series is to discuss the effects that engine drive cycle, lubricant formulations and in-service ageing of lubricants have on wear of critical engine components. In this paper, the Radioactive Tracer Technology technique was used to study the steady state wear behavior of a number of contacting surfaces in a Caterpillar 1P engine, as a function of the drive cycle. A test protocol consisting of 7 modes or stages was used to simulate a variety of drive cycles. The results from this work provide useful insights into the wear behavior of these surfaces under a variety of speed and load conditions.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2115
Kazuo Nishimura, Masatoshi Miura, Takashi Hashimoto, Keisuke Yari, Masaki Maruyama, Noboru Iseya, Kenji Takeoka, Kouichi Yasuda, Takahiro Yamazaki
Technical impacts on engine oil performance by the use of waste cooking oil as bio-diesel fuel (BDF) are not well understood while the industry has made significant progress in studies on quality specifications and infrastructure. The authors, who consist of a consortium organized by Japan Lubricating Oil Society (JALOS), examined technical effects of waste cooking oil as BDF on engine oil performance such as wear and high temperature corrosion using vehicle fleets and bench tests to identify technical issues of engine oil meeting the use of BDF. The study brings fundamental information about technical impacts of BDF on engine oils.
2011-08-30
Technical Paper
2011-01-2110
Farzan Parsinejad, Wilton Biggs
The delicate balance between global supply and demand for energy, in conjunction with environmental concerns related to burning fossil fuels, have resulted in vehicle designs that stress higher fuel economy. Among new engine designs is Direct Injection Spark Ignition, or DISI, which employs a more precise fuel metering system and is designed for combustion at higher compression ratios than Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. As a result, the performance of DISI engines can easily be altered by the presence of carbonaceous deposits on intake valves and in the combustion chamber. In this study, the characteristics of these deposits have been investigated using elemental and thermal analytical techniques. Deposits from intake valves and combustion chambers have been collected from various DISI engines (both older and more modern ones).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 44780

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: