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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2470
1999-10-25
Technical Paper
1999-01-3634
K. Urashima, X. Tong, J.S. Chang, A. Miziolek, L. A. Rosocha
Acid gas removal experiments are carried out in a large bench scale corona radical shower reactor-catalyst hybrid system. A simulated stationary jet engine test cell flue gas is air mixed with NO, SO2 and CH4. NO, NO2 and SO2 concentrations were measured by a Green Line gas analyzer and the trace by-products are determined by Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR). The aerosol particles generated by the acid gases and methane related plasma processes were collected by the electrostatic precipitator operated at !19 kV dc downstream of the reactor. The size of the reactor is (10×30×100 cm) and four pipe with nozzle type radical injectors are placed in series. The corona radical shower electrode used was a 6 mm o.d. tube equipped with 28 hollow electrodes (1.2 mm i.d./1.5 mm o.d.).
1958-01-01
Technical Paper
580373
HARVEY J. NOZICK
1959-01-01
Technical Paper
590152
F. P. CARR, STANLEY KALIKOFF
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570205
ROBERT C. KOHL, JOSEPH S. ALGRANTI
Abstract Some of the problems associated with the installation and use of a thrust reverser are best studied by means of full-scale tests. This paper describes two full-scale thrust-reverser installations tested by the NACA, one in a pylon-mounted engine simulating that on a jet bomber or transport and the other in a fighter-type airplane. The effects of reverse thrust on the airplane and engine are emphasized.
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570198
RALPH MEDROS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570067
R. E. LEDBETTER
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570162
D. W. PETERSEN
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550022
R. J. VANNELLI
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550025
C. M. RICE
1955-01-01
Technical Paper
550013
E. M. PHILLIPS, R. E. WEYMOUTH
1954-01-01
Technical Paper
540280
STEPHEN G. DEMIRJIAN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560275
J. M. Tyler, R. Krieghoff
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560277
ABE SILVERSTEIN, NEWELL D. SANDERS
1957-01-01
Technical Paper
570013
Elmer H. Davison
MATCHING studies of three turboprop engine configurations were made for flight conditions from sea-level static to 600 mph at 40,000 ft. It is concluded that turbine frontal area, stress, and pressure ratio requirements made exhaust-area adjustment desirable. Sfc depended primarily upon flight conditions and turbine temperature, with lowest sfc occurring at highest turbine temperature, flight velocity, and altitude. Free turbines restricted turbine temperature range and produced critical turbine requirements. Increasing a two-spool engine's outer-compressor pressure ratio increased turbine temperature range and made turbine requirements less critical.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560182
V. L. SCHATZ, A. L. WYNN, R. W. REMKE
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560189
J. L. LaMARCA, J. L. McCABE
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560042
Wendell E. Reed
THE role of pneumatics as a computing medium for engine control in high-speed flight is indicated, and use of pressure ratio as the logical pneumatic control parameter is discussed. The Microjet concept of pressure ratio control, operating without springs and evacuated references, is introduced and compared to conventional means. This principle is expanded to demonstrate various computing and function-generating operations with respect to theoretical and practical design criteria. Typical present and projected applications to the control of turbojet and ramjet engine cycles are illustrated. This paper received the SAE Wright Brothers Medal for 1955.
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560123
E. A. CARTER
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560178
STEPHEN G. DEMIRJIAN
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560173
Raymond Capiaux
1956-01-01
Technical Paper
560161
DEAN K. HANINK
1959-01-01
Technical Paper
590287
S. S. MANSON, G. M. AULT, B. PINKEL
1953-01-01
Technical Paper
530038
R. B. JOHNSON
1948-01-01
Technical Paper
480234
A. T. COLWELL, F. F. OFFNER, T. R. THOREN
1949-01-01
Technical Paper
490219
T. S. McCRAE
THE production problems associated with turbojet engines are not more complex than those encountered with reciprocating engines, according to the author, but they are of a surprisingly different nature. For instance, he points out that, whereas reciprocating engine parts are made chiefly from forgings, castings, and bar stock, the major portion of the turbojet engine is welded sheet metal structure. Then, the so-called hot parts - the combustion chamber, nozzle diaphragm, turbine, and tail cone - also present entirely new problems. The control of heat distortion caused by the high temperatures and the high temperature differentials in these parts requires closer coordination with metallurgists, steel mills, forge shops, welders, and parts fabricators than is required with reciprocating engines.
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500031
R.L. WELLS
1950-01-01
Technical Paper
500022
JERARD M. PEDERSON
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2470

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