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Viewing 1 to 30 of 6895
Event
2015-06-22
The focus of the Structural Analysis session is to share experiences on analyzing, testing, and developing solutions to structural noise and vibration problems from powertrain sources. Analytical modeling, experimental testing and predictive correlation are just a few of the tools used in this endeavor.
Event
2015-06-22
This session covers static and dynamic issues in the body and chassis that contribute to noise and vibration problems in vehicles. Included in this session are modal studies, measurement and analysis methods, transfer path analysis, design guidelines, and recommended practices for noise and vibration control of the body and chassis.
Event
2015-06-22
This session focuses on the development and application of analytical methods for characterizing the dynamic behavior of structural systems. Analysis methods for all structural components, subsystems and complete systems found in automotive vehicles will be considered, except for powertrain and driveline which are covered in Powertrain Structural Analysis session. Examples include (but are not limited to) body structure, chassis structure, seats and interior structures.
Event
2014-10-14
In response to global demands for environmental conservation, the automotive industry is placing greater focus on the development of fuel-efficient technologies to help reduce global CO2 emissions. With the aim of simultaneously improving fuel economy and driveability, TOYOTA has developed a new continuously variable transmission (CVT) vehicles in North America equipped with a 1.8-liter engine [1]. This new CVT features various technologies for improving fuel economy, including: the world's first coaxial 2-discharge port oil pump system, wider ratio coverage, a flex start system, low-viscosity CVT fluid, and a higher final gear ratio. This paper outlines the configuration, characteristics, performance, and new technologies of this CVT
Event
2014-09-24
This session is dedicated to topics dealing with the integration between the Powerplant system & the airframe. This session covers the physical & functional interfaces between the different components, and their aerodynamic, thermal, structural, loads & Dynamic integration. This session covers: the Engine, Nacelle, Pylon & associated local sub systems (Fuel, Bleed, Oil, Fire, Etc).
Event
2014-09-24
This session addresses all facets of aircraft lighting equipment–design, manufacture, operation, maintenance, and in-service experience. It will explore standards pertaining to aircraft lighting and lighting emission sources which will fulfill the needs and requirements of operational control and utility, including all lighting on and in an aircraft and under its control.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Thomas G. Jefferson, Svetan Ratchev, Richard Crossley
Abstract Aerospace assembly systems comprise a vast array of interrelated elements interacting in a myriad of ways. Consequently, aerospace assembly system design is a deeply complex process that requires a multi-disciplined team of engineers. Recent trends to improve manufacturing agility suggest reconfigurability as a solution to the increasing demand for improved flexibility, time-to-market and overall reduction in non-recurring costs. Yet, adding reconfigurability to assembly systems further increases operational complexity and design complexity. Despite the increase in complexity for reconfigurable assembly, few formal methodologies or frameworks exist specifically to support the design of Reconfigurable Assembly Systems (RAS). This paper presents a novel reconfigurable assembly system design framework (RASDF) that can be applied to wing structure assembly as well as many other RAS design problems. The framework is a holistic, hierarchical approach to system design incorporating reconfigurability principles, Axiomatic Design and Design Structure Matrices.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Lucas Irving, Svetan Ratchev, Atanas Popov, Marcus Rafla
Abstract The replacement for the current single-aisle aircraft will need to be manufactured at a rate significantly higher that of current production. One way that production rate can be increased is by reducing the processing time for assembly operations. This paper presents research that was applied to the build philosophy of the leading edge of a laminar flow European wing demonstrator. The paper describes the implementation of determinate assembly for the rib to bracket assembly interface. By optimising the diametric and the positional tolerances of the holes on the two bracket types and ribs, determinate assembly was successfully implemented. The bracket to rib interface is now secured with no tooling or post processes other than inserting and tightening the fastener. This will reduce the tooling costs and eliminates the need for local drilling, de-burring and re-assembly of the bracket to rib interface, reducing the cycle time of the operation. Ultimately, self-indexing components mean that the there is more flexibility as to what point in production the bracket can be attached to the rib.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Yvan Blanchard
Abstract Today, the design and optimization of complex 3D composites structures is managed by taking into account engineering and manufacturing constraints. If the manufacturing process is automated, especially using a robot, these constraints are particularly complex and a difficult compromise needs to be reached. Most of the technology available on the market, dedicated to automated processes offline programming, neglects some of these constraints, or can only highlight the manufacturing defects without any automatic or manual tools to solve the tape course programming issues. A new innovative approach has been developed to include engineering, material and process specifications, to help designers and NC programmers to optimize the final layup program in terms of structural properties and productivity rate. An aerospace case study using the automated fiber placement (AFP) process will be presented to highlights these offline programming capabilities.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Peter B. Zieve, Osman Emre Celek, John Fenty
Abstract The E7000 riveting machine installs NAS1097KE5-5.5 rivets into A320 Section 18 fuselage side panels. For the thinnest stacks where the panel skin is under 2mm (2024) and the stringer is under 2mm (7075), the normal process of riveting will cause deformation of the panel or dimpling. The authors found a solution to this problem by forming the rivet with the upper pressure foot extended, and it has been tested and approved for production.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Lutz Neugebauer
The demand of fulfilling increasing Prime Customer requirements forces Tier 1 suppliers to continually improve their system solutions. Typically, this will involve integration of “state of the art” tools to afford the Tier 1 supplier a throughput and cost advantage. The subject “Production Optimization Approach” addresses the machine and process optimization of automated fastening machines in operation at customer factories. The paper will describe and focus on the main aspects of production optimization of existing machines to meet and exceed the required customer production and reporting criteria. Furthermore, the paper will present existing examples based on use of the established diagnostic tools
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Helen Lockett, Sarah Fletcher, Nicolas Luquet
Abstract The installation of essential systems into aircraft wings involves numerous labour-intensive processes. Many human operators are required to perform complex manual tasks over long periods of time in very challenging physical positions due to the limited access and confined space. This level of human activity in poor ergonomic conditions directly impacts on speed and quality of production but also, in the longer term, can cause costly human resource problems from operators' cumulative development of musculoskeletal injuries. These problems are exacerbated in areas of the wing which house multiple systems components because the volume of manual work and number of operators is higher but the available space is reduced. To improve the efficiency of manual work processes which cannot yet be automated we therefore need to consider how we might redesign systems installations in the enclosed wing environment to better enable operator access and reduce production time. This paper describes a recent study that applied design for assembly and maintainability principles and CATIA v5 computer aided design software to identify small design changes for wing systems installation tasks.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Rainer Mueller, Matthias Vette, Andreas Ginschel, Ortwin Mailahn
Abstract The global competition challenges aircraft manufacturers in high wage countries. The assembly of large components happens manually in fixed position assembly. Especially the completion of the inner fuselage structure is done 100% manually. The shells have to be joined with rivets and several hundred clips have to be assembled to connect the shell to the frames. The poise of the worker is not ergonomic so a lot of physical stress is added to the worker and minimizes the working ability. Aircraft manufacturers need a lot of different production resources and qualified persons for the production, which provokes higher costs. Due to these high costs there is a demand for automated reconfigurable assembly systems, which offer a high flexibility and lower manufacturing costs. The research project “IProGro” deals with this challenge and develops innovative production systems for large parts. On one hand the flexibility is reached by a reconfigurable fixture for the components on the other hand it is achieved by assistance systems, which guide staff during assembly processes.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Darcy Allison, Edward Alyanak
The design challenges associated with advanced supersonic aircraft are best handled with a multidisciplinary approach. These aircraft are highly coupled in that small changes to one subsystem can have far-reaching effects on others. For the class of aircraft called the efficient supersonic air vehicle (ESAV), particular attention must be paid to the propulsion system design as a whole including installation effects in the airframe design. The propulsion system assumed for the ESAV is a three-stream variable cycle engine. A computational model has been built with the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) software to analyze this engine. Along with the variable cycle NPSS model, a three-ramp external compression inlet model meant for conceptual design has been developed. This inlet model will be used to capture installation effects so that they are accounted for during the aircraft conceptual design. The NPSS and inlet models are parameterized so that they can be used in a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) process.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Rudolf Neydorf, Youriy Sigida
Identification of propeller traction power specifications in aircraft mathematical description problems Under the mathematical simulation of the aircraft dynamic motion, an identification problem for a number of constants and functions which cannot be analytically calculated appears. Dependences of aerodynamic gap coefficients of the aircraft body and the airflow, as well as the traction power specifications of the active propulsors used in flight by the aircraft, are related to such functions. Nowadays, propellers only are used in the airships and other aerial vessels with the aerostatic keeping in-flight principle. In the automatic flight control systems, they act as actuation devices. When constructing a mathematical aircraft model, the thrust developed by the propulsor is often taken for an input control. However, there are a great many phases of transforming forces, moments, and kinds of energy, between the real input control (customarily, it is introducing fuel or power supply to the servomotor input) and the rotor thrust load.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Jay Wilhelm, Joseph Close
Uneven wing deployment of a Hybrid Projectile (HP), an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) that is ballistically launched and then transforms, was investigated to determine the amount of roll and pitch produced during wing deployment. During testing of an HP prototype, it was noticed that sometimes the projectile began to slightly roll after the wings were deployed shortly after apogee. In this study, an analytical investigation was done to determine how the projectile body dynamics would be affected by the wings being deployed improperly. Improper and uneven wing deployment situations were investigated throughout the course of this study. The first analyzed was a single wing delaying to open. The second was if only one wing was to lock into a positive angle of incidence. The roll characteristics when both wings were deployed but only one was locked into an angle of incidence resulted in a steady state roll rate of 4.5 degrees per second. It is imperative to ensure that an HP wing deployment mechanism must be designed to deploy as evenly as possible.
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