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Event
2015-06-22
This session focuses on the development and application of analytical methods for characterizing the dynamic behavior of structural systems. Analysis methods for all structural components, subsystems and complete systems found in automotive vehicles will be considered, except for powertrain and driveline which are covered in Powertrain Structural Analysis session. Examples include (but are not limited to) body structure, chassis structure, seats and interior structures.
Event
2015-06-22
The focus of the Structural Analysis session is to share experiences on analyzing, testing, and developing solutions to structural noise and vibration problems from powertrain sources. Analytical modeling, experimental testing and predictive correlation are just a few of the tools used in this endeavor.
Event
2015-06-22
This session covers static and dynamic issues in the body and chassis that contribute to noise and vibration problems in vehicles. Included in this session are modal studies, measurement and analysis methods, transfer path analysis, design guidelines, and recommended practices for noise and vibration control of the body and chassis.
Event
2014-10-14
Event
2014-09-24
This session is dedicated to topics dealing with the integration between the Powerplant system & the airframe. This session covers the physical & functional interfaces between the different components, and their aerodynamic, thermal, structural, loads & Dynamic integration. This session covers: the Engine, Nacelle, Pylon & associated local sub systems (Fuel, Bleed, Oil, Fire, Etc).
Event
2014-09-24
This session addresses all facets of aircraft lighting equipment–design, manufacture, operation, maintenance, and in-service experience. It will explore standards pertaining to aircraft lighting and lighting emission sources which will fulfill the needs and requirements of operational control and utility, including all lighting on and in an aircraft and under its control.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Darcy Allison, Edward Alyanak
The design challenges associated with advanced supersonic aircraft are best handled with a multidisciplinary approach. These aircraft are highly coupled in that small changes to one subsystem can have far-reaching effects on others. For the class of aircraft called the efficient supersonic air vehicle (ESAV), particular attention must be paid to the propulsion system design as a whole including installation effects in the airframe design. The propulsion system assumed for the ESAV is a three-stream variable cycle engine. A computational model has been built with the Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) software to analyze this engine. Along with the variable cycle NPSS model, a three-ramp external compression inlet model meant for conceptual design has been developed. This inlet model will be used to capture installation effects so that they are accounted for during the aircraft conceptual design. The NPSS and inlet models are parameterized so that they can be used in a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) process.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Rudolf Neydorf, Youriy Sigida
Identification of propeller traction power specifications in aircraft mathematical description problems Under the mathematical simulation of the aircraft dynamic motion, an identification problem for a number of constants and functions which cannot be analytically calculated appears. Dependences of aerodynamic gap coefficients of the aircraft body and the airflow, as well as the traction power specifications of the active propulsors used in flight by the aircraft, are related to such functions. Nowadays, propellers only are used in the airships and other aerial vessels with the aerostatic keeping in-flight principle. In the automatic flight control systems, they act as actuation devices. When constructing a mathematical aircraft model, the thrust developed by the propulsor is often taken for an input control. However, there are a great many phases of transforming forces, moments, and kinds of energy, between the real input control (customarily, it is introducing fuel or power supply to the servomotor input) and the rotor thrust load.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Matthieu Hutchison, Grégoire Lenoble, Umberto Badiali, Yannick Sommerer, Olivier Verseux, Eric Desmet
Fuel pressure surge is an essential topic for modern aircrafts and a main driver for airframe fuel system sizing. This phenomenon can occur both during normal and abnormal operations, notably resulting from a sudden change of fluid velocity due to the opening or closure of an engine valve. During aircraft development phase, Airbus specifies to engine manufacturers a pressure limit at the interface between the engine and airframe. The verification activities performed by engine manufacturers shall then ensure that the maximum pressure surge will not exceed these requirements. The purpose of this paper is to present the methodology developed by Airbus with the support of LMS Engineering (a Siemens PLM Software division) for the assessment of accurate fuel pressure surge at early program stages in the complete aircraft and engine environment. This methodology will help to avoid late airframe fuel system redesign and secure entry-into-service by driving the engine manufacturer verification & validation process.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Andre Hessling
Reducing maintenance and improving safety for commercial aircraft can at times oppose each other. Advanced technologies in LED’s and Super-capacitors have the potential to reduce maintenance and improve safety for aircraft. By introducing LED’s and Super-capacitors the performance profiles of these technologies require a rethinking of the Lighting systems and equipment setups. Rewriting Lighting System requirements allow for greater design solutions which will provide better Lighting products to support operators which will in turn make them more profitable and improve safety over products that are flying today. Two examples are presented: an LED Landing Light and a Supercap based emergency light. 1) Aircrafts need adequate illumination for night time landing. Currently this requirement is met via high power halogen lamp or HID lights. Useful light for the pilot is a combination of intensity and direction. Too much light in undesired direction can cause excessive halation in adverse weather conditions forcing the pilots to shut down the lights entirely.
Article
2014-07-29
Jaguar Land Rover (JLR)'s all-new Ingenium modular, turbocharged gasoline and diesel engine range targets significant internal friction reduction by using rolling-element bearings to support camshafts and balance shafts.
Standard
2014-07-29
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) describes the design approaches used for current applications of aircraft Brake-by-Wire (BBW) control systems. The document also discusses the experience gained during service, and covers system, ergonomic, hardware, and development aspects. The document includes the lessons that have been learned during application of the technology. Although there are a variety of approaches that have been used in the design of BBW systems, the main focus of this document is on the current state of the art systems.
Standard
2014-07-24
Scope—Traditional methods of photometry rely on the use of a goniometer to rotate the test item around two axes at right angles. This method is satisfactory for most situations but has certain disadvantages: a. Point-by-point measurements with a goniometer may be slow. With more advanced requirements, particularly for headlamps, where the entire beam pattern is of concern, isocandela measurements are becoming increasingly needed. Such testing can be very time consuming. b. For production quality assurance, the speed of a goniometer may not allow testing to keep pace with the production line if a large quantity of lamps must be sampled. c. High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps are becoming commonly used. Such lamps are orientation sensitive, changing in both lumen output and intensity distribution when tilted. This can introduce significant inaccuracies in test results when testing is performed using a goniometer. There is a need for alternative test techniques which can achieve very high speed data acquisition, the capture of full isocandela distribution, and the elimination of lamp tilting.
Standard
2014-07-22
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers plain spherical bearings which are self-aligning and self-lubricating by utilizing polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in a fabric composite or molded material that is bonded to the inner diameter surface of the race and when specified, to the bore diameter surface of the ball. These bearings are for use in the temperature range -65 to +325 °F (-54 to +163 °C).
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