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Event
2014-09-24
This session addresses all facets of aircraft lighting equipment–design, manufacture, operation, maintenance, and in-service experience. It will explore standards pertaining to aircraft lighting and lighting emission sources which will fulfill the needs and requirements of operational control and utility, including all lighting on and in an aircraft and under its control.
WIP Standard
2014-08-22
This SAE standard provides test procedures, performance requirements, design guidelines and installation guidelines for front fog lamps.
Standard
2014-08-11
This SAE Standard provides installation requirements, test procedures, design guidelines, and performance requirements for side turn signal lamps for vehicles less than 12 m in length.
Standard
2014-07-24
Scope—Traditional methods of photometry rely on the use of a goniometer to rotate the test item around two axes at right angles. This method is satisfactory for most situations but has certain disadvantages: a. Point-by-point measurements with a goniometer may be slow. With more advanced requirements, particularly for headlamps, where the entire beam pattern is of concern, isocandela measurements are becoming increasingly needed. Such testing can be very time consuming. b. For production quality assurance, the speed of a goniometer may not allow testing to keep pace with the production line if a large quantity of lamps must be sampled. c. High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps are becoming commonly used. Such lamps are orientation sensitive, changing in both lumen output and intensity distribution when tilted. This can introduce significant inaccuracies in test results when testing is performed using a goniometer. There is a need for alternative test techniques which can achieve very high speed data acquisition, the capture of full isocandela distribution, and the elimination of lamp tilting.
Video
2014-07-18
This video summarizes Chapter 11 of the book, “Theory and Applications of Aerodynamics for Ground Vehicles”, by Dr. T. Yomi Obidi, published by SAE International. Concepts demonstrated include the aerodynamic effect of a motorcycle leading-edge design and the effectiveness of the windshield in drag reduction.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Barbara Neuhierl, David Schroeck, Sivapalan Senthooran, Philippe Moron
Abstract This paper presents an approach to numerically simulate greenhouse windnoise. The term “greenhouse windnoise” here describes the sound transferred to the interior through the glass panels of a series vehicle. Different panels, e.g. the windshield or sideglass, are contributing to the overall noise level. Attached parts as mirrors or wipers are affecting the flow around the vehicle and thus the pressure fluctuations which are acting as loads onto the panels. Especially the wiper influence and the effect of different wiper positions onto the windshield contribution is examined and set in context with the overall noise levels and other contributors. In addition, the effect of different flow yaw angles on the windnoise level in general and the wiper contributions in particular are demonstrated. As computational aeroacoustics requires accurate, highly resolved simulation of transient and compressible flow, a Lattice-Boltzmann approach is used. The noise transmission through the interior is then modeled by statistical energy analysis (SEA), representing the vehicle cabin and the panels excited by the flow.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Arnaud Caillet, Antoine Guellec, Denis Blanchet, Thomas Roy
Abstract Since the last decade, the automotive industry has expressed the need to better understand how the different trim parts interact together in a complete car up to 400 Hz for structureborne excitations. Classical FE methods in which the acoustic trim is represented as non-structural masses (NSM) and high damping or surface absorbers on the acoustic cavity can only be used at lower frequencies and do not provide insights into the interactions of the acoustic trims with the structure and the acoustic volume. It was demonstrated in several papers that modelling the acoustic components using the poroelastic finite element method (PEM) can yield accurate vibro-acoustic response such as transmission loss of a car component [1,2,3]. The increase of performance of today's computers and the further optimization of commercial simulation codes allow computations on full vehicle level [4,5,6] with adequate accuracy and computation times, which is essential for a car OEM. This paper presents a study of a fully trimmed vehicle excited by structureborne excitations with almost all acoustic trims such as seats, dash insulator, instrument panel, headliner… which are modelled as poroelastic finite element (PEM) parts.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Denis Blanchet, Anton Golota, Nicolas Zerbib, Lassen Mebarek
Abstract Recent developments in the prediction of the contribution of wind noise to the interior SPL have opened a realm of new possibilities in terms of i) how the convective and acoustic sources terms can be identified, ii) how the interaction between the source terms and the side glass can be described and finally iii) how the transfer path from the sources to the interior of the vehicle can be modelled. This paper discusses in detail these three aspects of wind noise simulation and recommends appropriate methods to deliver required results at the right time based on i) simulation and experimental data availability, ii) design stage and iii) time available to deliver these results. Several simulation methods are used to represent the physical phenomena involved such as CFD, FEM, BEM, FE/SEA Coupled and SEA. Furthermore, a 1D and 2D wavenumber transformation is used to extract key parameters such as the convective and the acoustic component of the turbulent flow from CFD and/or experimental data whenever available.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Ze Zhou, Jonathan Jacqmot, Gai Vo Thi, ChanHee Jeong, Kang-Duck Ih
Abstract The NVH study of trimmed vehicle body is essential in improving the passenger comfort and optimizing the vehicle weight. Efficient modal finite-element approaches are widely used in the automotive industry for investigating the frequency response of large vibro-acoustic systems involving a body structure coupled to an acoustic cavity. In order to accurately account for the localized and frequency-dependant damping mechanism of the trim components, a direct physical approach is however preferred. Thus, a hybrid modal-physical approach combines both efficiency and accuracy for large trimmed body analysis. Dynamic loads and exterior acoustic loads can then be applied on the trimmed body model in order to evaluate the transfer functions between these loads and the acoustic response in the car compartment. The scenario study of installing different trim components into the vehicle provides information on the acoustic absorption and dynamic damping with regard to added vehicle weight by the trim.
WIP Standard
2014-06-26
This recommended practice describes the application of digital cameras to measurement of photometric quantities in the photometric laboratory.
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