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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2854
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1784
Guillaume Baudet
Automotive wind noise’s physic is complex : noise for passengers depend of : - acoustic transfer function in the cabin - transfer loss of seals and panels - first of all, exterior loading due to the flow around the vehicle For some years, we know that the exterior loading can and must be split in two parts : - Hydrodynamic (or turbulent) loading with high wave number pressure field - Acoustic loading with low wave number pressure field In simulation people start to separate the two pressure fields by complex signal processing. But in real life test, there is no simple method to do so. In this paper we present an inverse method, call “Panel Inverse Method” (PIM) which can extract the low wave number loading measured on a vehicle panel. The method may be known with the French “RIFF” name. It is based on acceleration measurement of the panel to calculate the pressure which create panel’s motion : that’s typically an inverse method.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1788
Kishore Chand Ulli, Upender Rao Gade
Automotive window buffeting is a source of vehicle occupant's discomfort and annoyance. Original equipment manufacturers (OEM) are using both experimental and numerical methods to address this issue. With major advances in computational power and numerical modelling, it is now possible to model complex aero acoustic problems using numerical tools like CFD. Although the direct turbulence model LES is preferred to simulate aero-acoustic problems, it is computationally expensive for many industrial applications. Hybrid turbulence models can be used to model aero acoustic problems for industrial applications. In this paper, the numerical modelling of side window buffeting in a generic passenger car is presented. The numerical modelling is performed with the hybrid turbulence model Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) using a commercial CFD code.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1807
Richard DeJong, Gordon Ebbitt
The SEA model of wind noise requires the quantification of both the acoustic as well as the turbulent flow contributions to the exterior pressure. The acoustic pressure is difficult to measure because it is usually much lower in amplitude than the turbulent pressure. However, the coupling of the acoustic pressure to the surface vibration is usually much stronger than the turbulent pressure, especially in the acoustic coincidence frequency range. The coupling is determined by the spatial matching between the pressure and the vibration which can be described by the wavenumber spectra. This paper uses measured vibration modes of a vehicle window to determine the coupling to both acoustic and turbulent pressure fields and compares these to the results from an SEA model. The interior acoustic intensity radiating from the window during road tests is also used to validate the results.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1814
Todd Tousignant, Kiran Govindswamy, Vikram Bhatia, Shivani Polasani, W Keith Fisher
The automotive industry continues to develop new powertrain and vehicle technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle level fuel consumption. Specifically, vehicle light weighting is expected to play a key role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Corning’s Gorilla® Glass Hybrid laminate solution offers more than 30% weight reduction compared to conventional automotive laminate. Additionally, Gorilla Glass Hybrid laminates provide improved toughness, better optics, and enables better vehicle dynamics by lowering the vehicle center of gravity. Although thin glazing offers multiple advantages, glazing weight reduction leads to an increase in transmission of sound through the laminates for certain frequencies. This paper documents a study that uses a systematic test-based approach to understand the sensitivity of interior vehicle noise behavior to changes in acoustic attenuation driven by installation of lightweight glass.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2854

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