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Viewing 1 to 30 of 11091
2017-11-01 ...
  • November 1-3, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Hydraulic brake systems, one of the most important safety features on many road vehicles today, must meet manufacturer and customer requirements in addition to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards. This course will analyze automotive braking from a system's perspective, emphasizing legal requirements as well as performance expectations such as pedal feel, stopping distance, fade and thermal management. Calculations necessary to predict brake balance and key system sizing variables that contribute to performance will be discussed.
2017-10-23 ...
  • October 23-24, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Once reserved for high-end luxury vehicles, electronic brake control systems are now required standard equipment on even the most inexpensive cars and trucks. Today, every new vehicle benefits from the optimized braking, enhanced acceleration, and improved stability that these systems provide. This comprehensive seminar introduces participants to the system-level design considerations, vehicle interface requirements, and inevitable performance compromises that must be addressed when implementing these technologies. The seminar begins by defining the tire-road interface and analyzing fundamental vehicle dynamics.
2017-09-29 ...
  • September 29, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Orlando, Florida
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
One of the most important safety critical components on cars, trucks, and aircraft is the pneumatic tire. Vehicle tires primarily control stopping distances on wet and dry roads or runways and strongly influence over-steer/under-steer behavior in handling maneuvers of cars and trucks. The inflated tire-wheel assembly also acts as a pressure vessel that releases a large amount of energy when catastrophically deflated. The tire can also serve as a fulcrum, both directly and indirectly, in contributing to vehicle rollover. This seminar covers these facets of tire safety phenomena.
2017-09-29 ...
  • September 29, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Orlando, Florida
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Brake noise is one of the highest ranked complaints of car owners. Grunts, groans, squeaks, and squeals are common descriptions of the annoying problem which brake engineers spend many hours trying to resolve. Consumer expectations and the high cost of warranty repairs are pushing the optimization of brake NVH performance. This course will provide you with an overview of the various damping mechanisms and tools for analyzing and reducing brake noise. A significant component of this course is the inclusion of case studies which will demonstrate how brake noise squeal issues have been successfully resolved.
2017-09-28 ...
  • September 28, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Orlando, Florida
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The choice of brake friction materials varies per application, but each must have the appropriate coefficient of friction and be able to disperse large amounts of heat without adversely effecting braking performance. This seminar will provide an introduction to brake lining raw materials and formulation, manufacturing, quality control and testing. The course covers the critical elements that must be reviewed before arriving at a lining selection decision. Different classes of friction material and their use will be defined.
2017-09-28 ...
  • September 28, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Orlando, Florida
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The principal functions of the pneumatic tire are to generate driving, braking, and cornering forces while safely carrying the vehicle load and providing adequate levels of ride comfort. This seminar explains how tire forces and moments are generated under different operating and service conditions and, in turn, demonstrates how these forces and moments influence various vehicle responses such as braking, handling, ride, and high-speed performance. The content focuses on the fundamentals of tire behavior in automobiles, trucks, and farm tractors, but also includes experimental and empirical results, when necessary.
2017-09-28 ...
  • September 28, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Orlando, Florida
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Brake Noise, Vibration, and Harshness (NVH) is recognized as one of the major problems currently faced by the automotive manufacturers and their suppliers, with customers warranty claims of more than $100 million per year for each manufacturer. With increasing consumer braking performance expectations, automotive OEM’s and suppliers need the ability to predict potential problems and identify solutions during the design phase before millions of dollars have been spent in design, prototyping, and manufacturing tooling.
2017-09-18 ...
  • September 18-20, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Design and development of a modern steering system influences vehicle response to steering wheel input, driver effort, comfort, safety and fuel economy. In this interactive seminar participants will analyze the steering system from the road wheel to the steering wheel. Day one will begin with a deep dive into the anatomy and architecture of the lower steering system (wheel end, suspension geometry, linkages and steering gear), its effect on vehicle response and how forces and moments at the contact patch are converted to a torque at the pinion.
2017-09-11 ...
  • September 11-15, 2017 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Designing a brake system requires the ability to balance a multitude of parameters against the required tradeoffs of system weight, system cost, and system performance. Understanding the basic fundamentals of how each brake component attribute contributes to the overall Force vs Deceleration behavior of the vehicle is critical to the design and release of a safe, legal and optimized system for today’s vehicles. Brake balance also is a contributing factor to other chassis control and safety systems, such as regenerative braking, ABS, and electronic brake distribution (EBD).
2017-08-07 ...
  • August 7-9, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • December 6-8, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
This seminar will present an introduction to Vehicle Dynamics from a vehicle system perspective. The theory and applications are associated with the interaction and performance balance between the powertrain, brakes, steering, suspensions and wheel and tire vehicle subsystems. The role that vehicle dynamics can and should play in effective automotive chassis development and the information and technology flow from vehicle system to subsystem to piece-part is integrated into the presentation. Governing equations of motion are developed and solved for both steady and transient conditions.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1804
Chulwoo Jung, Hyeon Seok Kim, Hyuckjin Oh, Kwang Hyeon Hwang, Hun Park
An efficient method to determine bush stiffness of passenger cars for satisfying requirement of noise and vibration is developed. In general, a passenger vehicle includes various types of bush to connect systems and control forces (loads) transferred between systems which affect characteristics of noise and vibration of the vehicle. Noise and vibration of a vehicle are mainly caused by forces from power train (engine and transmission) and road excitation. While a vehicle is in operation, road excitation is applied to the vehicle through bushes. If a bush transfers less force to the body structure, levels of noise and vibration will be decreased. In other words, it is necessary to well determine characteristics of bushes when developing passenger vehicles. Bush stiffness is one of key factors to affect the performance of noise and vibration of the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1851
Taewook Yoo, Ronald W. Gerdes, Seungkyu Lee, Daniel Stanley, Thomas Herdtle, Georg Eichhorn
Several methods for evaluating damping material performance are commonly used, such as Oberst beam test, power injection method and the long bar test. Among these test methods, the Oberst beam test method has been widely used in the automotive industry and elsewhere as a standard method, allowing for slight bar dimension differences. However, questions have arisen as to whether this Oberst test result reflect real applications. Therefore, the long bar test method has been introduced and has been used in the aerospace industry for some time. In addition to the larger size bar in the long bar test, there are a few differences between Oberst (cantilever) and long bar test (center-driven) methods. In this paper, the differences between Oberst and long bar test methods will be discussed both experimentally and numerically using Finite Element Analysis. Furthermore, guidelines for a long bar test method will be provided.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1904
Tan Li, Ricardo Burdisso, Corina Sandu
Tire-pavement interaction noise (TPIN) is a dominant source for passenger cars and trucks above 40 km/h and 70 km/h, respectively. TPIN is mainly generated from the interaction between the tire and the pavement. In this paper, twenty-two tires of the same size (16 in. radius) but with different tread patterns were tested on a non-porous asphalt pavement. For each tire, the noise data were collected using an on-board sound intensity (OBSI) system at five speeds in the range from 45 to 65 mph. The OBSI system used an optical sensor to record a once-per-revolution signal to monitor the vehicle speed. This signal was also used to perform order tracking analysis to break down the total tire noise into two components: tread pattern-related noise and non-tread pattern-related noise.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1879
Pranab Saha
Traditionally, the damping performance of a visco-elastic material is measured using Oberst bar damping test, where a steel bar is excited using a non-contacting transducer. However, in an effort to lightweight the vehicles, serious effort is put in to change the body panels from steel to aluminum and composite panels in many cases. These panels cannot be excited using a non contacting transducer, although in some cases a very thin steel panel (shim) is glued to the vibrating bar to introduce ferrous properties to the bar so it can be excited. In the off highway vehicles, although the panels are made of steel, they are very thick and are difficult to excite using the Oberst bar test method. This paper discusses a measurement methodology based on mechanical impedance measurements and has the potential to be a viable/alternate test method to the Oberst bar testing. In the impedance method, the test bar is mounted to a shaker at the center (Center Point method).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1901
Christian Glandier, Stefanie Grollius
With the reduction of engine noise in internal combustion engines and the advent of alternative propulsion systems, road noise has become the major source of interior noise in urban and suburban driving in the low frequency range. The challenges of weight reduction, performance improvement and reduced development time call for stronger support of the development process by numerical methods. The long and complex transfer paths from the road surface to the occupants’ ears through tire, chassis, bushings, body, trim and air cavity make such a prediction a non-trivial task. This starts with the tire. Tire manufacturers have a thorough knowledge of their product and the physics involved in its behavior and deploy refined simulation techniques. However, interfacing difficulties between tire simulation and vehicle simulation very often lead to unnecessary losses in accuracy.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1836
Fangfang Wang, Peter Johnson, Hugh Davies, Bronson Du
Introduction Whole-body vibration (WBV) is associated with several adverse health and safety outcomes including low-back pain and driver fatigue. Recently introduced active suspension truck seats have been shown to reduce WBV exposures up to 50% relative to industry standard air-suspension seats, but drivers do not universally prefer these active suspension seats and their higher costs concern some companies. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of three commercially-available air-suspension truck seats for reducing truck drivers’ exposures to WBV. Methods Seventeen truck drivers operating over a standardized route were recruited for this study and three commercially available air suspension seats were evaluated. The predominant, z-axis average weighted vibration (Aw) and Vibration Dose Values (VDV) were calculated and normalized to represent eight hours of truck operation.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 11091

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