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Viewing 1 to 30 of 19328
2016-10-24
Event
This session considers modeling (zero-D, 1D, 2D, 3D CFD) and experimental papers on: combustion chamber, systems (lubrication, cooling, fuel, EGR); components (oil pumps, coolant pump, fuel injectors, compressors, turbines, turbochargers, torque converters, gear box, fans, bearings, valves, ports, manifolds, turbine housing); heat exchangers (radiators, oil coolers); aftertreatment (SCR, DOC, DOF, exhaust gas cooling); battery cooling (HEV, EV, motor/generator) and controls (passive and active).
2016-10-24
Event
The focus of this session is the measurement and analysis of in-cylinder and port flows in research and production engines. Topics may including PIV, PTV, LDV, and fluorescent tracer measurements of velocity and turbulence characteristics and modeling analysis of engine flows.
2016-10-24
Event
The session covers advances in the development and application of models and tools involved in multi-dimensional engine modeling: advances in chemical kinetics, combustion and spray modeling, turbulence, heat transfer, mesh generation, and approaches targeting improved computational efficiency. Papers employing multi-dimensional modeling to gain a deeper understanding of processes related to turbulent transport, transient phenomena, and chemically reacting, two-phase flows are also encouraged.
2016-10-24
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, and quasi-dimensional models for simulation of SI and CI engines with respect to: engine breathing, boosting, and acoustics; SI combustion and emissions; CI combustion and emissions; fundamentals of engine thermodynamics; numerical modeling of gas dynamics; thermal management; mechanical and lubrication systems; system level models for controls; system level models for vehicle fuel economy and emissions predictions.
2016-10-24
Event
This session is devoted to experimental and computational work in the area of fuel injection systems and sprays. Topics include: spray characterization, cavitation, multi-phase jet modeling, CFD models for spray processes, wall films and impingement, hydraulic circuit analysis, and dissolved gas effects. Studies of both gasoline and diesel fuel sprays and fuel injection equipment are encouraged.
2016-10-24
Event
Papers cover exhaust aftertreatment system models, as well as their validation and application. Technologies encompassed include DOC, HC Trap, DPF, GPF, LNT, TWC, SCR, SCRF, ammonia oxidation catalysts, hybrid or combined catalysts, urea-water solution spray dynamics, and mixture non-uniformity. Modeling aspects range from fundamental, 3D models of individual components to system level simulation, optimization, variation, degradation, and control.
2016-10-24
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1815
Augusto Della Torre, Gianluca Montenegro, Angelo Onorati
In the last decades numerical simulations have become reliable tools for the design and the optimization of silencers for internal combustion engines. Different approaches, ranging from simple 1D models to detailed 3D models, are nowadays commonly applied in the engine development process, with the aim to predict the acoustic behavior of intake and exhaust systems. However, the acoustic analysis is usually performed under the hypothesis of infinite stiffness of the silencer walls. This assumption, which can be regarded as reasonable for most of the applications, can lose validity if low wall thickness are considered. This consideration is even more significant if the recent trends in the automotive industry are taken into account: in fact, the increasing attention to the weight of the vehicle has lead to a general reduction of the thickness of the metal sheets, due also to the adoption of high-strength steels, making the vibration of the components a non negligible issue.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1818
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Abom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract The concept of IC engine downsizing is a well-adapted industry standard, enabling better fuel conversion efficiency and the reduction of tailpipe emissions. This is achieved by utilizing different type of superchargers. As a consequence, the additional charger noise emission, at the IC engine inlet, can become a problem. In order to address such problem, the authors of this work have recently proposed a novel dissipative silencer for effective and robust noise control of the compressor. Essentially, it realizes an optimal flow channel impedance, referred to as the Cremer impedance. This is achieved by means of a straight flow channel with a locally reacting wall consisting of air cavities covered by an acoustic resistance, e.g., a micro-perforated panel (MPP). In this paper, an improved optimization method of this silencer is presented. The classical Cremer impedance model is modified to account for mean flow dependence of the optimal wave number.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1821
Lin Du, Mats Abom, Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract To tune the acoustics of intake systems resonators are often used. A problem with this solution is that the performance of these resonators can be affected a lot by flow. First, for low frequencies (Strouhal-numbers) the acoustic induced vorticity across a resonator inlet opening will create damping, which can reduce the efficiency. Secondly, the vorticity across the opening can also change the end-correction (added mass) for the resonator, which can modify the resonance frequency. However, the largest problem that can occur is whistling. This happens since the vortex-sound interaction across a resonator opening for certain Strouhal-numbers will amplify incoming sound waves. A whistling can then be created if this amplified sound forms a feedback loop, e.g., via reflections from system boundaries or the resonator. To analyse this kind of problem it is necessary to have a model that allows for both sound and vorticity and their interaction.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1830
Denis Blanchet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract This paper presents new advances in predicting wind noise contribution to interior SPL in the framework of the Wind Noise German Working Group composed of Audi, Daimler, Porsche and VW. In particular, a new approach was developed that allows to fully describe the wind noise source using CFD generated surface pressure distribution and its cross-correlation function and apply this source on an SEA side glass. This new method removes the need to use a diffuse acoustic field or several plane waves with various incidence angle to approximate the correct acoustics source character to apply on the SEA side glass. This new approach results are compared with results previously published which use more deterministic methods to represent the side glass and the interior of a vehicle.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1804
Stefan Becker, Katrin Nusser, Marco Oswald
Aim of the ongoing development of passenger cars is to predict the interior acoustics early in the development process. A significant noise component results from the flow phenomena in the area of the side window. The complex turbulent flow field in the wake of the a-pillar and the side mirror is characterized by velocity and pressure fluctuations. The flow field results in sound sources which transmit noise into the passenger cabin. In addition to that, it excites the structure, resulting in a radiation of structure-borne noise into the interior of the car. In the present work, as a first step in solving this three part problem, a Large Eddy simulation of the flow was conducted to investigate the sound generation due to external air turbulence. For this purpose, a simplified model of an automobile was used. In addition to the LES, a Delayed-Detached Eddy simulation (DDES) and an unsteady RANS (URANS) simulation of the same model were carried out.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1808
Manfred Kaltenbacher, Andreas Hüppe, Aaron Reppenhagen, Matthias Tautz, Stefan Becker, Wolfram Kuehnel
The cabin noise of modern ground vehicles is highly affected by flow related noise sources. Especially in case of a stationary vehicle, fan-noise and noise generated from the outlet of the air-conditioning system may significantly reduce passenger’s comfort. Thereby, fans generate a highly turbulent flow field and can be identified as the main noise source in air conditioning units. Numerical methods such as Computational Aero Acoustics (CAA) are very capable of locating the sources of sound generation and also to predict the propagation of sound. The simulation and visualization of the occurring phenomena can contribute to a better understanding of the generation mechanisms and help to minimize unwanted noise and to optimize entire components. This contribution focuses on the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of rotating parts in air conditioning units using the Arbitrary Mesh Interface (AMI), which is implemented in OpenFOAM®.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1854
Johannes Seifriedsberger, Rudolf Wichtl, Helmut Eichlseder
Based on the increasing demand for an appealing NVH behavior in combination with aggravated conditions out of lightweight design and alternative propulsion systems, there is a growing importance of simulation methods in the process of vehicle NVH development. The presented article is concerned with the simulation of the piston movement of an internal combustion engine and its impact on the structure-borne noise characteristic, considering variations in geometry parameters as well as different cylinder pressure profiles at a constant output torque. The simulation model represents one cylinder of an actual passenger car Diesel engine and is based on flexible multi-body dynamic analyses (AVL EXCITE Power Unit). To obtain highly accurate results close to reality, a 3d-elastohydrodynamic piston-liner contact is used.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1761
Antonio Acri, Guenter Offner, Thomas Resch, Eugene Nijman, Roberto Corradi
Abstract For vibration and acoustics vehicle development, one of the main challenges is the identification and the analysis of the noise sources, which is required in order to increase the driving comfort and to meet the stringent legislative requirements for the vehicle noise emission. Transfer Path Analysis (TPA) is a fairly well established technique for estimating and ranking individual low-frequency noise or vibration contributions via the different transmission paths. This technique is commonly applied on test measurements, based on prototypes, at the end of the design process. In order to apply such methodology already within the design process, a contribution analysis method based on dynamic substructuring of a multibody system is proposed with the aim of improving the quality of the design process for vehicle NVH assessment and to shorten development time and cost.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1794
Jonathan Caprile, Claire Chaufour, Pierre Emile Chartrain
Abstract In automotive NVH, the noise generated by a powertrain is still one of the major noise sources especially at low and mid vehicle velocity. For this reason automotive OEMs are continuously focusing on methods to efficiently analyze this noise source. For this purpose, a well-established simulation methodology can provide results thoroughly, within a limited amount of time and with a reduced cost contrary to experiments which are involved in late design phases and are more expensive. This paper aims at presenting an approach to simulate efficiently the acoustic radiation from automotive components. With this aim in mind, the acoustic response of a realistic powertrain unit subjected to working conditions ranging from 1000 RPM to 4500 RPM is studied until 3000 Hz. Several radiating boundary conditions will be assessed in order to detect the most efficient set-up for this kind of problem and to extract the optimized modeling guidelines.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1775
Thomas Resch, Oliver Knaus, Siegmund Thomann, Stephan Brandl
Abstract Modern powertrain noise investigation in the development process and during trouble shooting is a combination of experiment and simulation. In simulation in recent years main focus was set on model completeness, consideration of all excitation mechanisms and efficient and stabile numerical algorithms. By that the total response of the virtual powertrain is already comparable to the overall noise level of the real powertrain. Actual challenge is to trace back the overall response to its main excitation and noise generating mechanism as well as to their main driving parameters to support the engineer not only in reaching absolute values, but also to derive the root cause of a response or potential problem and to get hints on how to improve the specific behavior. Approaches by parameter sensitivity studies are time consuming and not unambiguous.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1768
He Changming, Xu Sichuan
For an in-line diesel engine with four cylinder operating in four-stroke mode, the second-order reciprocating inertia forces generally cannot be well balanced with direct approach. The unbalanced second-order inertia forces are the main reason to cause vibration and noise in a diesel engine within low frequency range. The more superior tone quality for modern diesel engine has been expected even for bus application all the time, and there are tougher requirements for truck noise in developed countries, i.e. in Europe and USA. In present research a unique crankshaft system configuration was proposed, which including opposed piston, inner and outer connecting rod, and crankshaft but running in two-stroke mode, to eliminate the second-order inertia force considerably rather than by adding an extra balance shaft mechanism.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1778
Gesche Fender, Steffen Marburg, Fabian Duddeck
Abstract One method to lower noise in a cabin is to position damping layers on vibrating panels, thereby reducing their radiated power. To assess the damping effect, criteria like the ERP (equivalent radiated power) are widely employed, which estimate the radiated sound power of a panel without taking into account the actual complex system. Advantageously only a part of the structure has to be modeled, but the optimal solution found on the simplified model then often fails for the complete, coupled system, especially if several variants of a cabin have to be considered. Hence, it is proposed to use the structure-only optimization for identification of a set of candidate solutions for optimal positioning of damping layers. These candidate solutions used as initial designs for the coupled investigations should be well distributed in the design space to avoid being wrongly stuck in an optimum with inferior coupled performance.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1779
Sergio Carvajal, Daniel Wallner, Reinhard Helfrich, Michael Klein
Abstract Numerical methods for brake squeal analysis are widely accepted in industry. The use of complex eigenvalue analysis is a successful approach to predict the appearance of squeal noise. Using simulation in an early design stage reduces time to market, saves costs, and improves the physical behavior and robustness of the brake system. State of the art of brake simulation comprises sampling for many parameter sets in a wide range of interesting values. Based on high performance, stability maps can be created in short time containing many results, which gives a deep insight into the brake behavior under varying parameters. An additional benefit of sampling is the possibility to detect parts with high potential for improving the NHV comfort. In the sequel, mathematical optimization methods like topology optimization or shape optimization are used for systematic improvements.
2016-05-17
Event
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