Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 18317
Training / Education
2015-06-26
Most muffler design in the automotive industry is accomplished by using "cut-and-try" methods that rely on what has worked in the past and/or extensive full-scale testing on engines for validation. New computer software aimed at muffler design can shorten the design cycle and yield more effective results. This four hour seminar provides an introduction to the behavior of mufflers and silencers including a description of the two-port approach to muffler design. This seminar covers the acoustic simulation of muffler and silencer systems and the use of experimental methods to measure muffler performance. Following a review of basic muffler concepts and definitions, this seminar will focus on meeting design objectives such as insertion loss with a specified back pressure requirement. This seminar will show how modern software such as SIDLAB can be used to model both the acoustics and flow in achieving the design objective and the role that 1D engine simulations can play in providing important input.
Event
2015-06-22
This session provides a good overview of recent innovations to SEA modeling techniques. SEA models can be used alone or together with hybrid analytical or experimental techniques to establish good comparative NVH predictions at the earliest stage of the vehicle design process. The papers of this session will describe recent advances and / or validations of SEA theory, applications, or use in conjunction with hybrid techniques for high- and mid-frequency NVH predictions.
Training / Education
2015-02-17
Today's transportation industries are facing multi-disciplinary challenges. The product design and development process challenges often contradict each other, for example cost, weight, quality and performance. A central challenge is the need for cost and mass reduction to compete in the global market, while continuing to meet all new and existing requirements for quality and performance. Accelerated Concept to Product (ACP) Process is a performance-driven, holistic, product design development method intended to create a balance between structure and strength, synchronizing the individual facets of the product development process. It takes advantage of design, material and manufacturing experience using multiple CAD, CAE and CAO tools to reduce product design and development time and costs, as well as to reduce product mass and improve product performance. This three-session web seminar will offer information on how to design a concept model from a clean sheet using a holistic 3G design approach (ACP-3G), where material types and its properties (Grades and Gauges), Geometry (shape), and manufacturing process can work together for the optimum weight and performance.
Training / Education
2014-11-20
Engineers are taught to create designs that meet customer specifications. When creating these designs, the focus is usually on the nominal values rather than variation. Robustness refers to creating designs that are insensitive to variability in the inputs. Much of the literature on robustness is dedicated to experimental techniques, particularly Taguchi techniques, which advocate using experiments with replications to estimate variation. This course presents mathematical formulas based on derivatives to determine system variation based on input variation and knowledge of the engineering function. If the function is unknown, experimental techniques are presented to efficiently estimate a function. The concept of designing for both nominal values and variability is expanded to multiple outputs and designing to minimizing costs. Traditionally, if the output variation is too large to meet requirements, the tolerances (variation) of the inputs are reduced. Using the approach presented in this course, the equations presented can be used to identify the contribution of each of the inputs to the output variation.
Event
2014-11-19
The session is associated with engine and vehicle simulation tasks and their related measurements. Simulation and measurement methodology as well as the simulation and measurement application on development tasks will find a place within the session.
Event
2014-11-19
The session is associated with engine and vehicle simulation tasks and their related measurements. Simulation and measurement methodology as well as the simulation and measurement application on development tasks will find a place within the session.
Event
2014-11-18
The session is associated with engine and vehicle simulation tasks and their related measurements. Simulation and measurement methodology as well as the simulation and measurement application on development tasks will find a place within the session.
Event
2014-11-18
The session is associated with engine and vehicle simulation tasks and their related measurements. Simulation and measurement methodology as well as the simulation and measurement application on development tasks will find a place within the session.
Event
2014-11-18
The session is associated with engine and vehicle simulation tasks and their related measurements. Simulation and measurement methodology as well as the simulation and measurement application on development tasks will find a place within the session.
Event
2014-10-20
The focus of this session is the measurement and analysis of in-cylinder and port flows in research and production engines. Topics may including PIV, PTV, LDV, and fluorescent tracer measurements of velocity and turbulence characteristics and modeling analysis of engine flows.
Event
2014-10-20
The spectrum of papers solicited for this session reflect the truly multi-disciplinary nature of the field of Multi-Dimensional Engine Modeling. The session covers advances in the development and application of models and tools involved in multi-dimensional engine modeling. This includes advances in chemical kinetics, combustion and spray modeling, turbulence, heat transfer, mesh generation, and approaches targeting improved computational efficiency. Papers employing multi-dimensional modeling to gain a deeper understanding of processes related to turbulent transport, transient phenomena, and chemically reacting, two-phase flows are also encouraged.
Event
2014-10-20
Separate sub-sessions cover zero-dimensional, one-dimensional, and quasi-dimensional models for simulation of SI and CI engines with respect to: engine breathing, boosting, and acoustics; SI combustion and emissions; CI combustion and emissions; fundamentals of engine thermodynamics; numerical modeling of gas dynamics; thermal management; mechanical and lubrication systems; system level models for controls; system level models for vehicle fuel economy and emissions predictions.
Event
2014-10-20
Papers are invited for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system models as well as their validation and application. Technologies covered include DOC, HC Trap, DPF, LNT, SCR, ammonia oxidation catalysts, hybrid or combined catalysts, urea-water solution spray dynamics, and mixture non-uniformity. Modeling aspects range from fundamental, 3D models of individual components to system level simulation, optimization, and control
Event
2014-10-20
The EcoCAR 2: Plugging in to the Future student vehicle competition, sponsored by General Motors and the U.S. Department of Energy, tasks university teams with designing, implementing and refining advanced powertrains into a conventional midsize sedan. This session presents yearly results from teams in the competition, highlighting the entire EcoCAR vehicle development process.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Shuonan Xu, David Anderson, Amrit Singh, Mark Hoffman, Robert Prucka, Zoran Filipi
The looming shortage of crude oil provides impetus for engineers to use alternative gaseous fuels in existing engines. Dual-fuel natural gas engines preserve diesel thermal efficiencies and reduce fuel cost without imposing consumer range anxiety. Increased complexity poses several challenges, including the transient response of an engine with direct injection of diesel fuel and injection of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) upstream of the intake manifold. A 1-D simulation model of a Cummins ISX heavy duty, dual-fuel, natural gas-diesel engine modeled in the GT-Power environment is developed to study and improve transient response. The simulated VGT behavior, intake and exhaust geometry, valve timings and injector models are validated through experimental results. A triple Wiebe combustion model is applied to characterize experimental combustion results for both diesel and dual-fuel operation. The ignition delay and injection timing are determined through an iterative calculation based on Start of Combustion (SOC) and a predictive ignition delay correlation.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Prasanth Balasubramanian, Bharathan Sivashanmugham
This paper presents the air intake system model for turbocharged diesel engine with EGR. The individual models of intake system components and EGR were assembled to develop a global air intake system. The model monitors the pressure, temperature and air flow rate at various levels in the intake system and predicts the volumetric efficiency of engine and pumping losses in the valves. The validation of the developed model is done by correlating the simulated results with the experimental results. The model showed a good agreement with measurements for both steady state and transient conditions. The validated model is used run a DOE following robust engineering approach (Taguchi method) and the results were analyzed. This approach enabled reduction of the variation of the air intake temperature that is inducted by the cylinders upon wide range of ambient conditions and EGR flow rates. The model is then used to optimize the intake system to reduce the pressure fluctuations and improve the volumetric efficiency of the cylinders.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Tao Yin, Tie Li, Longhua Chen, Bin Zheng, Fei Zhao
Worldwide demands for better fuel economy and less pollutant emissions of automobiles are driving vehicle manufactures to seek further technical improvements in reciprocating engines. Spark ignited (SI) engines have a significant optimization potential by techniques such as supercharging, variable valve timing, downsizing, exhaust gas recirculation or direct injection. Each method distinctively influences the engine performance in variable operating conditions, which makes it complex to apply these techniques in a synergy pattern. Therefore, optimization of engine parameters is expected to make full use of the positive coupling techniques.This paper studies the effect of cooled EGR on fuel consumption and anti-knock performance of a boosted port fuel injection (PFI) SI engine. Experimental results show that the cooled EGR increases the thermal efficiency by 2%~18% depending on the operation conditions. Compared to low load operations, more improvements of the thermal efficiency are obtained at higher loads, primarily owing to the enhanced anti-knock performance, advanced combustion phasing, elimination of fuel-rich operations as well as reduced heat transfer loss with cooled EGR.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
A.F. Khan, A.A. Burluka, Dave OudeNijeweme, Jens Neumeister, John Mitcalf, Paul Freeland
A holistic modelling approach has been employed to predict combustion, cyclic variability and knock propensity of a high power density SI engine fuelled with gasoline. A quasi-dimensional, thermodynamic combustion modelling approach has been coupled with realistic chemical kinetics modelling of autoignition using reduced mechanisms for gasoline surrogates. The quasi-dimensional approach has been found to allow a fast and appreciably accurate prediction of the effects of operating conditions on the engine performance. It has also provided an insight in to the stability of the turbulent flame as the engine load and speed is varied. The cyclic variability was modelled by perturbing the in-cylinder turbulence and charge composition according to a Gaussian distribution. Its coupling with autoignition modelling allowed to elucidate the effects of operating conditions such as spark-timing and charge temperature on the autoignition onset. In this approach, the autoignition propensity has been predicted for the entire spectrum of cyclic variations in cylinder pressure.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Yongqiang Han, Jianjian Kang, Xianfeng Wang, Yang Chen, Zhichao Hu
Energy saving and environment protection has been two major subjects in the development of automobile industry. In the internal combustion engine, about 40% of fuel energy is released into the atmosphere through waste gas. The recovery and utilization of the heat from waste gas can realize the goals of energy saving and cost reducing. In fieldof waste heat recovery, the organic Rankine cycle (ORC) has good prospects and has been widely used.Turbo has been selected firstly as the expander in traditional ORC. However, turbo has disadvantages of high manufacturing cost and narrow applicable range. In this paper, a new organic Rankinecycle coupling free piston (ORC-FP) system used in theinternal combustion engine (ICE) exhaust heatrecovery is proposed and its working principle is introduced in detail.In this system, the free piston with constant force outputfunctions as expander in ORC and operates reciprocally to output workunder the driven of working fluid R245ca,which absorbs heat from waste gas and provides vapor power.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Pawel Magryta
Nowadays more sophisticated ways are search for alternative supply of combustion engines. One of the commonly used alternative fuels is hydrogen. On the market there are quite a number of passenger cars, which are powered by hydrogen fuel. The development of this technology is primarily connected with the introduction of hydrogen refueling stations, and hydrogen storage and distribution systems. We can predict that much faster popularization trend of hydrogen fuel would bring the possibility of modifying the existing fuel supply systems of internal combustion engines for use this environmentally friendly fuel. Adaptation of existing vehicles equipped with spark-ignition engines in the ability to support combustion by dosing additional dose of hydrogen would enable the introduction of this alternative fuel on a larger scale than at present. In order to verify the assumptions of the additive supplying hydrogen, simulation test model of a spark ignition engine, developed in the AVL BOOST software was presented in the article.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Qiyou Deng, Richard Burke
As the requirements of vehicle pollutant emissions and fuel consumption are getting stricter, engine downsizing through turbocharging to improve the efficiency of vehicles is becoming more popular. However, for now, the turbocharger models are based on characteristic maps derived from experimental measurements taken under steady conditions on dedicated gas stand facility. Under these conditions heat transfer is ignored and consequently the predictive performance of the model is compromised, particularly under the part load and dynamic operating conditions that are representative of real powertrain operation. Although some physics based models have been proposed to account for the thermal behaviour of the device, these require considerable experimental effort to determine the model parameters that is not practical for industrial applications. A more accurate model that is easily parameterised would benefit turbocharger-engine matching and engine controller design. This paper proposes to apply a dynamic mathematical model that uses a polynomial structure, the Volterra Series, for the modelling of the turbocharger system.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Mohd Farid Muhamad Said, Azhar Bin Abdul Aziz, Zulkanain Abdul Latiff, Amin Mahmoudzadeh Andwari, Shahril Nizam Mohamed Soid
Many efforts have been invested to improve the fuel efficiency of vehicles mainly for the local consumers. The production of a downsized turbocharged engine in the last quarter of 2011 proves that Malaysian is racing towards producing high efficiency engines along with other manufacturers. The effort does not only end there, several research activities on other alternative technology including cylinder deactivation (CDA) has begun. In this paper, the main research area is focus on the investigation of cylinder deactivation (CDA) technology on common engine part load conditions within Malaysian city driving operation. CDA mostly being applied on multi cylinders engines. It has the advantage in improving fuel consumption by reducing pumping losses at part load engine conditions. Here, the application of CDA on 1.6 liter four cylinders gasoline engine is studied. One-dimensional (1-D) engine modeling is performed to investigate the effect of intake and exhaust valve strategy on engine performance with CDA.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Daniela Siano, Maria Antonietta Panza, Danilo D'Agostino
The easiest way to identify knock conditions during the operation of a SI engine is represented by the knowledge of the in-cylinder pressure. Traditional techniques like MAPO (Maximum Amplitude Pressure Oscillation) based method rely on the frequency domain processing of the pressure data. This technique may present uncertainties due to the correct specification of some model parameters, like the band-pass frequency range and the crank angle window of interest. In this paper two innovative techniques for knock detection, which make use of the in-cylinder pressure, are explained in detail, and the results are compared with those coming from the MAPO method. The first procedure is based on the use of statistical analysis by applying an Auto Regressive (AR) technique, whilst the second technique makes use of the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). The data useful for the analysis have been acquired on a high compression ratio four cylinder, spark ignition engine. Results demonstrate that the analyzed methods give quite similar outcomes but they also highlight that AR and DWT techniques present an higher sensitivity for soft knock detection.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Fabrizio Bonatesta, Salvatore La Rocca, Edward Hopkins, Daniel Bell
Gasoline Direct Injection engines, even in their latest generation, are an important source of ultra-fine particulate matter. The ever more stringent emission regulations across the globe, along with the renewed medical evidence of the adverse impact on human health, indicate further research is needed to improve design and control of the GDI technology, with the aim of reducing PM emissions. Commonly, two phenomena are reported as the most important sources of soot formation in GDI engines: the inherent poor fuel-air mixture preparation; the interaction between high-velocity fuel spray and combustion chamber walls. Computational Fluid Dynamics modelling is a cost-effective alternative to testing and, if appropriately configured, may offer useful insight into the details of fuel spray and mixture preparation. Given the acknowledged connection between combustion and soot formation processes, CFD modelling may also lead to improved understanding useful for the optimization of combustion control strategies specifically designed to minimise engine-out soot emissions.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Shui-chang Liu, Lifu Li, Zhengqi Gu
In vehicle cooling system, the essential components—radiators often interact with each other air-side flow field thereby the thermal performance. To calculate the radiators’ performance more accurately at lower time cost against the background of today’s highly competitive marketplace, based on the CFD tools, a radiator group performance prediction method of a engineering vehicle cooling system is presented in this study. During CFD simulation, the RNG k–ε turbulence model is applied and the adopted numerical methods is SIMPLE, the first upwind discrete method is used firstly to get steady flow field and the second upwind is used to reach convergence at last. Air-side flow field simulations of the radiators unit model are carried out firstly to obtain the radiators resistance and heat transfer characteristics, during which three near-wall treatments are applied respectively, and simulations result present that flow field obtained from simulation with enhanced wall treatment has the least separated flow and backflow, also pressure drop; then, the air flow and heat transfer in the whole air channel containing the radiator group are simulated to get the inlet and outlet water temperatures of radiator group, during which radiators’ are processed as porous media with heat resource distribution near to the actual condition; at last, the water temperatures obtained from simulations are compared with the test values and the temperatures according to the enhanced wall treatment has lowest relative error 6.3%, which can meet the accuracy requirement in engineering computation, so the performance calculated method proposed in this paper is effective.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 18317

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: