Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 4946
Event
2014-10-20
The spectrum of papers solicited for this session reflect the truly multi-disciplinary nature of the field of Multi-Dimensional Engine Modeling. The session covers advances in the development and application of models and tools involved in multi-dimensional engine modeling. This includes advances in chemical kinetics, combustion and spray modeling, turbulence, heat transfer, mesh generation, and approaches targeting improved computational efficiency. Papers employing multi-dimensional modeling to gain a deeper understanding of processes related to turbulent transport, transient phenomena, and chemically reacting, two-phase flows are also encouraged.
Event
2014-04-10
This technical session will showcase the creation and application of various tools that will allow for the design and manufacture of parts, equipment, facilities and tests that eliminate the need for physical part prototyping early in a program. The ability to model various aspects of design, test and manufacturing allows for more accurate, cost effective and faster development and product delivery to market.
Event
2014-04-10
This technical session will showcase the creation and application of various tools that will allow for the design and manufacture of parts, equipment, facilities and tests that eliminate the need for physical part prototyping early in a program. The ability to model various aspects of design, test and manufacturing allows for more accurate, cost effective and faster development and product delivery to market.
Video
2014-04-10
On the first day of the SAE 2014 World Congress in Detroit, Argonne National Laboratory launched a new program designed to help automakers design more efficient engines via optimized combustion. Called VERIFI (Virtual Engine Research Institute and Fuels Initiative), the program builds on the lab's already extensive expertise in engine combustion research to allow for very fast simulations.
Event
2014-04-09
Engineers and managers in many industries use computer simulation to increase the efficiency of their operations. These industries include the aerospace, automotive, defense, finance, and shipbuilding. Engineering students and practitioners consistently rank computer simulation as the most useful, popular tool in the broader area of manufacturing, operations research and management. Computer simulation is a powerful tool for assessing the performance of systems and optimizing them. This chat will discuss the use discrete and continuous simulation models to study queuing networks, and manufacturing systems. The role of correlation and its impact on accuracy will be reviewed. Commercial simulation software, such as Arena will be discussed. Tools for statistical inference to draw conclusions and to identify the best system configuration will be reviewed.
Event
2014-04-08
Interactive distributed automotive real time systems are typically used due to the increase in the complexity of automotive system design. The software development of these systems is very challenging and has many real-time constraints distributed in several electronic control units (ECUs) and communication bus(es). This Chat will discuss the challenges in the real time software architectures due to the stated challenges. The AUTOSAR timing extension will be explored as a good practice to provide clear timing requirements for each ECU and provide sufficient timing information for real time measurements and for efficient validation of the system real time requirements. Furthermore, the new trends of real time measurements and profiling to validate the real time architecture will be covered. Finally, the impact of using multi-core for such distributed automotive real time systems could be discussed taking AUTOSAR Release 4 operating system as an example.
Event
2014-04-08
The dialog with stakeholders in order to obtain their support adoption and expansion of AR applications and processes requires metrics and several parallel communication strategies. Panelist will share how they have sought to measure the potential value of Augmented Reality for both internal and external customers, how and when they translate pilot results into impacts for the business, and the multidisciplinary approaches used to engage with business groups.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joydeep Banerjee, John McPhee, Paul Goossens, Thanh-Son Dao
Abstract The analysis of nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery performance is very important for automotive researchers and manufacturers. The performance of a battery can be described as a direct consequence of various chemical and physical phenomena taking place inside the container. In this paper, a physics-based model of a Ni-MH battery will be presented. To analyze its performance, the efficiency of the battery is chosen as the performance measure, which is defined as the ratio of the energy output from the battery and the energy input to the battery while charging. Parametric sensitivity analysis will be used to generate sensitivity information for the state variables of the model. The generated information will be used to showcase how sensitivity information can be used to identify unique model behavior and how it can be used to optimize the capacity of the battery. The results will be validated using a finite difference formulation.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shola Slough, Paul Goossens, Christine Schwarz, Thanh-Son Dao
Abstract As the demand for electric motors and drives grows, designers and manufacturers are faced with the challenge of understanding the effects of often non-deterministic duty cycles on their products. Too often, flaws in the design that can lead to failure only come to light when a prototype is built, or worse, after the product has been launched, leading to delays in product releases or costly recalls. To help mitigate these risks, designers are increasingly turning to simulation technologies that not only allow the engineer to implement the electric drives and motors but also all the various engineering factors, such as mechanical loads, vibrations and thermal effects, together in a single “virtual prototype” to get a clearer idea of how the whole system will behave over multiple duty cycles. Furthermore, if the resulting model can be fully parameterized it is then possible to perform sensitivity studies to determine which parameters will have the greatest influence on the overall behavior and therefore focus on them to understand effect of parameter variation through the lifetime of the product.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Oguz H. Dagci, Ram Chandrasekaran
Abstract This paper outlines the characterization of a Li-Ion Iron Phosphate battery pack with nominal voltage of 700V as well as the modeling of this pack as an equivalent electrical circuit (EEC) for the purpose of vehicle simulations. For a higher level of fidelity and accuracy, the equivalent circuit is initially modeled as an R-2RC circuit which consists of a voltage source with one resistor (R) and two resistor-capacitor (RC) branches. In this modeling effort, first, several open circuit voltage (OCV) determination methods in the literature are benchmarked and state-of-charge (SOC) dependent OCV curve which is used in the voltage source of the EEC model is derived. Then, two methods of parameter estimation of the EEC are developed for both step current and dynamic current profiles. The first estimation method is applicable to discharge or charge step currents and relies mostly on the relaxation portion of the battery response and involves some manual calibration. The second estimation method utilizes online parameter estimation techniques and learns the EEC parameters automatically by processing the battery response to some special designed dynamic current profiles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yinyin Zhao, Song-Yul Choe
Abstract Models for lithium ion batteries based on electrochemical thermal principles approximate electrodes with spheres. Ion concentration in the spheres is described using Fick's second law with partial differential equations (PDE), which can be solved numerically. The model calculation time, especially the electrode ion concentration part, should be reduced as less as possible for real time control purposes. Several mathematical methods have been proposed to reduce the complexity of PDE in electrode particles which include polynomial approximation, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), Padé approximation, Galerkin reformulation and etc. These methods are compared to each other with different input current density. Then, selected method is further integrated into a reduced order model (ROM) for a complete battery that considers Li ion concentration, potentials in electrode and electrolyte. Evaluation of simulation results reveal that the 3rd order Padé approximation serves as a better computationally efficient replacement for the diffusion equation in lithium ion battery model.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Adam Ing, Ramin Masoudi, John McPhee, Thanh-Son Dao
Abstract Due to rising fuel prices and environmental concerns, Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEVs) have been gaining market share as fuel-efficient, environmentally friendly alternatives. Lithium-ion batteries are commonly used in EV and HEV applications because of their high power and energy densities. During controls development of HEVs and EVs, hardware-in-the-loop simulations involving real-time battery models are commonly used to simulate a battery response in place of a real battery. One physics-based model which solves in real-time is the reduced-order battery model developed by Dao et al. [1], which is based on the isothermal model by Newman [2] incorporating concentrated solution theory and porous electrode theory [3]. The battery models must be accurate for effective control; however, if the battery parameters are unknown or change due to degradation, a method for estimating the battery parameters to update the model is required. A set of manufacturer recommended battery parameters were evaluated using a numerical sensitivity analysis to evaluate their identifiability.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Dragan Simic, Dominik Dvorak, Hannes Lacher, Helmut Kuehnelt, Elena Paffumi, Michele De Gennaro
Abstract This contribution deals with the modeling and validation of multi-physical battery-models, by using the programming language Modelica. The article presents a battery model which can be used to simulate the electric, thermal and aging behavior of a lithium-ion traction battery of an EV in different load conditions. The model is calibrated with experimental data of an electric vehicle tested on a chassis dynamometer. The calibration parameters, that are the open circuit voltage, the serial resistance and the resistance and capacitance of two serially connected RC-circuits, are used to configure the electric equivalent circuit model of the battery. The calibration process is based on a best-fit of the measured data from one test, while the validation is made by comparing measured and simulated battery voltages of a different battery load cycle. The comparison between simulations and experiments shows that this model is capable to accurately reproduce the real-world behavior of the battery, providing the scientific community with a novel approach for design and optimization purposes.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sandeep Karande, Michael Olson, Bipul Saha
Abstract Computer simulation is commonly used to determine the impact of hybrid vehicle technology on fuel economy and performance. One input required for this approach is a drive cycle that represents the desired vehicle speed at each time step in the simulation. Due to computational hardware limitations, simulated drive cycle durations are required to be shorter than those actually driven by real vehicles. Hence there is a need to develop a representative drive cycle of smaller time duration. For example, it is desirable to develop a one hour drive cycle that can give the same fuel economy and performance results as a drive cycle spanning many weeks. Specifically for the design of hybrid systems, it is desired that certain characteristics of micro-trips within the full length cycle are well replicated in the representative cycle. Taking these requirements into account, a new methodology was developed and tested. This paper explains this methodology and the final results obtained.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Tom Mockeridge, Hans-Peter Dohman, David Phiilips
Abstract Today's sophisticated state-of-the-art powertrains with various intelligent control units (xCU) need to be calibrated and tested stand-alone as well as in interaction. Today the majority of this work is still carried out with prototype vehicles on test tracks. Moving prototype vehicle tests from the road into the lab is key in achieving shorter development times and saving development cost. This kind of frontloading requires a modular and powerful simulation of all vehicle components, test track, and driver in steady state and dynamic operation. The described HIL (Hardware In the Loop) high performance driveline dyno test bed uses driveline components and models from the engine all the way to the wheel ends. The test cell was built to do real time vehicle maneuvers and NVH testing. This test setup can emulate any road surface and grade and vehicle inertia including wheels and engine as close to reality as possible. This test set-up will be used to calibrate, test, and validate the complete driveline system or any part thereof.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hadi Adibi asl, Ramin Masoudi, Roydon Fraser, John McPhee
Abstract This paper presents a math-based spark ignition (SI) engine model for fast simulation with enough fidelity to predict in-cylinder thermodynamic properties at each crank angle. The quasi-dimensional modelling approach is chosen to simulate four-stroke operation. The combustion model is formulated based on two-zone combustion theory with a turbulent flame propagation model [1]. Cylinder design parameters such as bore and stroke play an important role to achieve higher performance (e.g. power) and reduce undesirable in-cylinder phenomenon (e.g. knocking). A symbolic sensitivity analysis is used to study the effect of the design parameters on the SI engine performance. We used the symbolic Maple/MapleSim environment to obtain highly-optimized simulation code [3]. It also facilitates a sensitivity analysis that identifies the critical parameters for design and control purposes. Among various schemes used in the sensitivity analysis of dynamical systems, internal differentiation is used in this research project due to its reliability and robustness [4].
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shuming Chen, Yawei Huang, Dengfeng Wang, Dengzhi Peng, Xuewei Song
This paper proposes a new method of predicting the sound absorption performance of polymer wool using artificial neural networks (ANN) model. Some important parameters of the proposed model have been adjusted to best fit the non-linear relationship between the input data and output data. What's more, the commonly used multiple non-linear regression model is built to compare with ANN model in this study. Measurements of the sound absorption coefficient of polymer wool based on transfer function method are also performed to determine the sound absorption performance according to GB/T18696. 2-2002 and ISO10534- 2: 1998 (E) standards. It is founded that predictions of the new model are in good agreement with the experiment results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Christian Scheiblegger, Nantu Roy, Orlando Silva Parez, Andrew Hillis, Peter Pfeffer, Jos Darling
Abstract Cab mounts and suspension bushings are crucial for ride and handling characteristics and must be durable under highly variable loading. Such elastomeric bushings exhibit non-linear behavior, depending on excitation frequency, amplitude and the level of preload. To calculate realistic loads for durability analysis of cars and trucks multi-body simulation (MBS) software is used, but standard bushing models for MBS neglect the amplitude dependent characteristics of elastomers and therefore lead to a trade-off in simulation accuracy. On the other hand, some non-linear model approaches lack an easy to use parameter identification process or need too much input data from experiments. Others exhibit severe drawbacks in computing time, accuracy or even numerical stability under realistic transient or superimposed sinusoidal excitation. To improve bushing modeling of cab/box mounts for heavy duty/light duty trucks, a practical approach to model non-linear bushing dynamic characteristics has been tested and validated against standard bushing models.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sebastian Salbrechter, Markus Krenn, Gerhard Pirker, Andreas Wimmer, Michael Nöst
Abstract Optimization of engine warm-up behavior has traditionally made use of experimental investigations. However, thermal engine models are a more cost-effective alternative and allow evaluation of the fuel saving potential of thermal management measures in different driving cycles. To simulate the thermal behavior of engines in general and engine warm-up in particular, knowledge of heat distribution throughout all engine components is essential. To this end, gas-side heat transfer inside the combustion chamber and in the exhaust port must be modeled as accurately as possible. Up to now, map-based models have been used to simulate heat transfer and fuel consumption; these two values are calculated as a function of engine speed and load. To extend the scope of these models, it is increasingly desirable to calculate gas-side heat transfer and fuel consumption as a function of engine operating parameters in order to evaluate different ECU databases. This paper describes the creation of a parameter-based heat transfer model using a statistical approach.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Yuanjiang Pei, Ruiqin Shan, Sibendu Som, Tianfeng Lu, Douglas Longman, Michael J. Davis
Abstract Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) is conducted for a diesel engine simulation to understand the sensitivities of various modeling constants and boundary conditions in a global manner with regards to multi-target functions such as liquid length, ignition delays, combustion phasing, and emissions. The traditional local sensitivity analysis approach, which involves sequential perturbation of model constants, does not provide a complete picture since all the parameters can be uncertain. However, this approach has been studied extensively and is advantageous from a computational point of view. The GSA simultaneously incorporates the uncertainty information for all the relevant boundary conditions, modeling constants, and other simulation parameters. A global analysis is particularly useful to address the important parameters in a model where the response of the targets to the values of the variables is highly non-linear. The study represents the first demonstration of the GSA for engine simulations.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kambiz Jahani, Sajjad Beigmoradi, Mohsen Bayani Khaknejad
Abstract The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of spot-weld modeling approaches on NVH virtual simulation problems. For this purpose, finite element method is considered for further simulations. The goal is to evaluate and compare results within the domain of 0 to 200 Hz by modeling spot-welds with three different element types: a rigid body constraint element (RBE), two rigid body elements with hexahedral solid element (RBE3-HEXA-RBE3) and CWELD constraint. In order to evaluate the effects, three main NVH analyses are chosen for this study. In the first place, a free-free modal analysis is performed for the BIW and trimmed body models of a D-segment saloon car in order to estimate natural frequencies and mode shapes. Afterwards, a frequency response analysis is performed to evaluate the dynamic stiffness of engine mount. Finally, a noise transfer function (NTF) simulation is carried out to calculate the sound pressure level at driver ear's location. The out coming results from each type of simulations are extracted and compared to investigate the effect of spot-weld modeling on the accuracy of FEM analyses results concerning NVH problems.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gang Tang, Jinning Li, Chao Ding, Yunqing Zhang
Abstract This paper describes a simplified model to identify sprung mass using golden section method, the model treats the unsprung mass vertical acceleration as input and the sprung mass vertical acceleration as output, which can avoid the nonlinear influence of trye. Unsprung mass can be also calculated by axle load and the identified sprung mass. This study carries out road test on the vehicle ride comfort and takes a scheme that the group of 20 km/h is used to identify sprung mass and the group of 80 km/h is used to verify the identification result. The similarity of the results from the simulation and experiments performed are, for the sprung mass, 98.59%. A conclusion can be drawn that the simple method to measure the sprung mass in the suspension systems in used vehicles, such as the vehicle shown here, is useful, simple and has sufficient precision.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael Karner, Martin Krammer, Anton Fuchs
Abstract Automotive electric and electronic (E/E) systems are key drivers for innovation in today's vehicles. While new functions are delivering eco-friendliness (hybrid and pure electric vehicles, etc.), assistance/comfort (drive-by-wire, park-assist, etc.) and active safety (electronic stability control, lane-change-assist, brake-assist, etc.) their inherent complexity is challenging manufacturers and suppliers. At the same time, functional safety of the product is a key issue: During the whole car's product life cycle, there are many potential risks for physical injuries, or even worse, fatalities. Therefore, these potential sources of harm should strictly be avoided. In this work, we focus on a powerful method for verification and validation activities during early phases of the development, namely simulation. Simulation is one of the main methods for verification stated by the functional safety standard ISO 26262. The usage of simulation is primarily targeting requirements on implementation, functional performance and accuracy.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hongyi Xu, Monica T. Majcher, Ching-Hung Chuang, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
Abstract Response Surface Model (RSM)-based optimization is widely used in engineering design. The major strength of RSM-based optimization is its short computational time. The expensive real simulation models are replaced with fast surrogate models. However, this method may have some difficulties to reach the full potential due to the errors between RSM and the real simulations. RSM's accuracy is limited by the insufficient number of Design of Experiments (DOE) points and the inherent randomness of DOE. With recent developments in advanced optimization algorithms and High Performance Computing (HPC) capability, Direct Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (DMDO) receives more attention as a promising future optimization strategy. Advanced optimization algorithm reduces the number of function evaluations, and HPC cut down the computational turnaround time of function evaluations through fully utilizing parallel computation. In this paper, we test the performance of RSM-based optimization and DMDO using multiple benchmark problems of both analytical mathematical examples and a vehicle design.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Maria Stampouli, Menelaos Pappas
Abstract The growing complexity of simulation and analysis for new products has created new challenges in improving CAE productivity and effectiveness. The information required for down-streaming CAE processes is often unavailable, untraceable, outdated or susceptive to human errors and the information of previous best practices is not usually captured as applicable knowledge for future use. Additionally, the CAE cycle is a collaborative process involving not only data but also human and non-human resources, rendering a solution with a holistic approach essential. This work describes how these challenges are addressed by the Simulation Process, Data and Resources Management (SPDRM) system. A real-case industry scenario is used to demonstrate how CAE data and activities can be associated with the available resources, while defining and handling workflows in a common environment. This scenario discusses a CAE analysis process, validated by a renowned automotive OEM. The process workflow consists of the simulation setup, the post-processing of results and the reporting phase.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
B. Vasanth, Jose Bright, Pavan Reddy, Sathish Kumar S, Murali Govindarajalu
Abstract In an Automotive air conditioning system, the air flow distribution in the cabin from the HVAC (Heating, ventilation and air conditioning), ducts and outlets is evaluated by the velocity achieved at driver and passenger mannequin aim points. Multiple simulation iterations are being carried out before finalizing the design of HVAC panel duct and outlets until the target velocity is achieved. In this paper, a parametric modeling of the HVAC outlet is done which includes primary and secondary vane creation using CATIA. Java macro files are created for simulation runs in STAR CCM+. ISIGHT is used as an interface tool between CATIA and STARCCM+. The vane limits of outlet and the target velocity to be achieved at mannequin aim points are defined as the boundary conditions for the analysis. Based on the optimization technique and the number of iterations defined in ISIGHT, the vane angle model gets updated automatically in CATIA followed by the simulation runs in STARCCM+. Based on the results vane angle will get updated and the iterations continues automatically till the target velocity is met at the aim points.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Santosh Uttam Bhise, Meyyappan Valliappan
Abstract This paper highlights a simplified CAE model technique, which can simulate and predict door crush strength performance quickly. Such quick models can be used for DFSS and Design change studies. The proposed method suggests an equivalent sub model technique using only the door beam with tuned stiffness end springs to predict FMVSS214S full vehicle crush performance. Such models can be solved in minutes and hence very useful for DFSS studies during product design. The proposed method can be used to finalize door beam design for identical size of vehicle doors to meet required FMVSS214S crush performance. The paper highlights the door beam end springs tuning for identical size of cars and SUVs. Four vehicles were considered for the study. A single spring F-D (force -displacement) is tuned which correlated well for frond door of all the four vehicles. A separate unique spring F-D was needed which correlated well for rear door of all the 4 vehicles.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4946

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: