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Viewing 1 to 30 of 7849
2016-12-05 ...
  • December 5-16, 2016 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used by engineers as a design tool in new product development since the early 1990's. Until recently, most FEA applications have been limited to static analysis due to the cost and complexity of advanced types of analyses. Progress in the commercial FEA software and in computing hardware has now made it practical to use advanced types as an everyday design tool of design engineers. In addition, competitive pressures and quality requirements demand a more in-depth understanding of product behavior under real life loading conditions.
2016-11-14 ...
  • November 14-18, 2016 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Design Review Based on Failure Modes (DRBFM) is a methodology focused on change management and continuous improvement. It centers on early prevention and engineering knowledge, eliminating time spent debating ranking systems, waiting for lead engineers to document and list their concerns, identifying what types of concerns are open for discussion and resolution, and brainstorming without any actionable closure. This web seminar will explain all phases of the DRBFM methodology and provide details on how to accomplish the specific steps.
2016-11-14 ...
  • November 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a systematic method for preventing failure through the discovery and mitigation of potential failure modes and their cause mechanisms. Actions are developed in a team environment and address each high: severity, occurrence or detection ranking indicated by the analysis. Completed FMEA actions result in improved product performance, reduced warranty and increased product quality.
2016-11-09 ...
  • November 9, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Providing you have an understanding of tolerance stacks, this course teaches an introduction to statistical tolerance stacks, a crucial skill in today’s competitive workplace. Utilizing the expertise of world-renowned GD&T expert Alex Krulikowski, the course includes a brief overview of several terms used in statistical stacks. It explains four methods for applying statistics to tolerance stacks and covers precautions about when and how to use statistics in stacks. Newly acquired learning is reinforced throughout the class with stacks that allow the student to practice applying statistical methods.
2016-11-08 ...
  • November 8-18, 2016 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been widely implemented by automotive companies and is used by design engineers as a tool during the product development process. Design engineers analyze their own designs while they are still in the form of easily modifiable CAD models to allow for quick turnaround times and to ensure prompt implementation of analysis results in the design process.
2016-10-26
Event
This session covers topics regarding new CI and SI engines and components. This includes analytical, experimental, and computational studies covering hardware development as well as design and analysis techniques.
2016-09-29 ...
  • September 29-30, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Engines can and do experience failures in the field in a variety of equipment, vehicles, and applications. On occasion, a single vehicle type or equipment family will even experience multiple engine failures leading to the inevitable need to determine what the most likely cause of one or all of those failures was. This comprehensive seminar introduces participants to the methods and techniques used to determine the most likely cause of an individual engine or group of engine failures in the field.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2090
Sergey Lupuleac, Margarita Petukhova, Julia Shinder, Alexander Smirnov, Mariia Stefanova, Nadezhda Zaitseva, Tatiana Pogarskaia, Elodie Bonhomme
Perspective way of solving the problem of aircraft assembly optimization is global simulation of junction process using efficient numerical algorithms. Specialized software complex [1] was developed within the framework of cooperation between Airbus SAS and Saint Petersburg Polytechnic University. This tool allows engineers to simulate the aircraft assembly process and solve the number of tasks: • Calculation of resulting gap under given initial disposition of riveted parts and distribution of fastening elements; • Determination of fastening element pattern that provides sufficient quality of assembly; • Shimming prediction; • Evaluation of stresses caused by assembly. The tool is based on special approach that necessitates solving contact problem arising when aircraft parts are being joined. This problem can be described by several simplifying assumptions such as ommiting tangential displacements and friction from consideration and creating substructure for junction area.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2124
Sara Nilsson, Jonas Jensen, Mats Björkman, Erik Sundin
For the aerospace industry carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) is one of the fastest developing materials right now. The material has a strength-to-weight ratio that is several times higher than aluminium and steel, which makes it a great fit for applications where a low weight is crucial while maintaining strength and stiffness. It is specifically CFRP in pre-impregnated form, so called pre-preg, which has made its way into the aircrafts. Pre-preg is an anisotropic material that lets the designer control its properties to a high level of detail. Analogously to the material becoming used more widely in the aerospace industry the costs have decreased as the manufacturing methods have developed to follow the demands. However, how material and manufacturing method change the requirements and affect a product's design and performance can be hard to determine.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2123
Matthias Busch
The integration of omega stringers to panels made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) by adhesive bonding, which are joined together in an autoclave, must be subject to high quality standards. Defects such as porosity, kissing bonds, voids or inclusion must be detected safely to guaranty the functionality of the component. Therefore, an inspection system is required to verify these bonds and detect different kinds of defects. In this contribution, the advantages of a robotic inspection system, which will be achieved through continuous testing, will be introduced. The testing method is the active thermography. The active thermography has major advantages compared with other non-destructive testing methods. Compared to testing with ultrasonic there is no coupling medium necessary, thus testing will be significantly enhanced.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2126
Ali Mohamed Abdelhafeez, Sein Leung Soo, David Aspinwall, Anthony Dowson PhD, Dick Arnold
Despite the increasing use of carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites, titanium and aluminium alloys still constitute a significant proportion of modern civil aircraft structures, which are primarily assembled via mechanical joining techniques. Drilling of fastening holes is therefore a critical operation, which has to meet stringent geometric tolerance and integrity criteria. The paper details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model for drilling aerospace grade aluminium (AA7010-T7451 and AA2024-T351) and titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloys. The FE simulation employed a Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian (CEL) technique. The cutting tool was modelled according to a Lagrangian formulation in which the mesh follows the material displacement while the workpiece was represented by a non-translating and material deformation independent Eulerian mesh.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8067
Suresh Kumar Kandreegula, Kamal Rohilla, Gaurav Paliwal, Naveen Sukumar, Naveen Pratap Tripathi
Three on the tree. Four on the Floor. The gear change mechanism is a component that is too often taken for granted but it is one of the more important features of the vehicle. It must be quick and smooth in action, efficient and totally reliable. Modern driving conditions demand that the driver makes frequent gear changes and a mechanism that is temperamental or inaccurate can be both frustrating and dangerous as well as physically tiring. The gear changing mechanism starts, quite obviously, with the gear lever. Most stem from the fact that a gear lever must move in two planes, forward and back and then from side to side to move across the gear "gate". A good many drivers think of gear changing as one simple action. This is more a tribute to the design of gear changing mechanisms than a reality.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8027
Stefan Steidel, Thomas Halfmann, Manfred Baecker, Axel Gallrein
Rolling resistance and tread wear of tires do particularly influence the maintenance costs of commercial vehicles. Although the tire labeling is established in Europe, it is meanwhile well-known that, due to the respective test procedures, these labels do not hold in realistic application scenarios in the field. This circumstance arises from the development phase of tires, where the respective performance properties are mainly evaluated in tire/wheel standalone scenarios in which the wide range of usage variability of commercial vehicles cannot be considered adequately. Within this article we address a method to predict indicators for rolling resistance and tread wear of tires in realistic application scenarios considering application-based factors of influence like specific customers, operation circumstances, regional dependencies, fleet specific characteristics etc. Moreover, the prescribed methodology may also be transferred to the prediction of fuel consumption and emission.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8152
Brian R. McAuliffe, David Chuang
In an effort to support Phase 2 of Greenhouse Gas Regulations for Heavy-Duty Vehicles in the United States, a track-based test program was jointly supported by Transport Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Research Council Canada to verify aerodynamic evaluation methodologies proposed by the US EPA. Coast-down and Constant-Speed tests were conducted with a modern aerodynamic tractor matched to a conventional 53 ft dry-van trailer, and outfitted with two drag reduction technologies. Enhanced wind-measurement instrumentation was introduced, consisting of a vehicle-mounted fast-response pressure probe and four track-side sonic anemometers that, when used in combination, provided reliable measurements of the wind conditions experienced by the vehicle during the tests.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2025
Amir Fazeli, Adnan Cepic, Susanne Reber
Aircraft weight and center of mass are two critical design and operational parameters that have to be within a design envelope to ensure a safe and efficient operation of aircraft. Previous efforts to accurately determine aircraft weight and center of mass before takeoff using landing gear shock strut pressures have failed due to the distortion of measured pressures by shock strut seal friction. Currently, aircraft loading process is controlled with loading sheets and passenger/cargo weight estimation as there are no online measurement systems that can accurately and efficiently estimate aircraft weight and determine the center of mass location before takeoff. However, errors in loading sheets, shifting cargo and errors in weight estimation could lead to incorrect loading of aircraft and, consequently, increase the risk of accidents, particularly in cargo flights.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1985
Fei Gao, Serhiy Bozhko, Patrick Wheeler
The paper will deal with the problem of establishing a desirable power sharing in multi-feed electric power system for future More-Electric Aircraft (MEA) platforms. The MEA is one of the major trends in modern aerospace engineering aiming for reduction of the overall aircraft weight, operation cost and environmental impact. Electrical systems are employed to replace existing hydraulic, pneumatic and mechanical loads. Hence the onboard installed electrical power increases significantly and this results in challenges in the design of Electrical Power Systems (EPS). One of the key paradigms for future MEA EPS architectures assumes high-voltage dc distribution with multiple sources, possibly of different physical nature, feeding the same bus(es). In our study we investigate control approaches to guarantee that the total electric load is shared between the sources in a desirable manner.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1988
Rodney Yeu, Jason Wells, Chad Miller, Jane Thompson
Movement toward more-electric architectures in military and commercial airborne systems has led to electrical power systems (EPSs) with complex power flow dynamics and advanced technologies specifically designed to improve power quality in the system. As such, there is a need for tools that can quickly analyze the impact of technology insertion on the system-level dynamic transient and spectral power quality and assess tradeoffs between impact on power quality versus weight and volume. Traditionally, this type of system level analysis is made through computationally intensive time-domain simulations involving high fidelity models or left until the hardware fabrication and integration stage. In order to provide a more rapid analysis prior to hardware development and integration, a stochastic equivalent circuit analysis is developed that can provide power quality assessment directly in the frequency domain.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2008
Alexander Grima, Colin Theodore, Oliver Garrow, Ben Lawrence, Linnea Persson
The Elytron 2S (Elytron Aircraft Inc. 2016) is a prototype for an advanced VTOL concept aircraft consisting of a box wing and a small centrally mounted tiltwing with tilting rotors. The concept aircraft is proposed in two sizes, 4 and 10 seater, and is envisaged for use as an air taxi or perhaps for transportation of crews of oil and gas rigs. This aircraft design, attained after 10 years of research, should allow helicopter VTOL capabilities as well as fixed wing like speeds with greatly reduced cost in comparison to any existing solutions. This paper will describe the modeling and analysis of the aerodynamic characteristics of a 2-seat experimental version of the aircraft using computational analysis in AVL (Drela and Youngren 2016) and RotCFD (Sukra Helitek Inc. 2016). The aim of the research is to model the vehicle and enable predictions of aerodynamic performance for comparison with experimental results obtained through flight testing.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1999
Debabrata Pal, Frank Feng
Cooling of high current bus bars in aircraft power panels is performed by natural convection and radiation. Thermal analysis is done using Joule heating method where the heat dissipation in bus bar is computed based on current, specified resistivity, temperature coefficient of bus bar material and geometry of bus bar. In 3 phase AC application, there is additional heat dissipation due to skin effects and proximity effects. In addition, when the 3 phase AC is used to drive a motor at high frequency (1000-1400 Hz), this results in additional higher frequency harmonics, resulting in higher losses. In this paper a thermal and electrical FEA analysis is done for a bus bar system. For electrical loss model, Infolytica MAGNET is used to characterize losses in three parallel bus bars carrying AC at various frequencies. This loss analysis provided additional losses due to skin, proximity and higher frequency harmonics. Then this loss is incorporated the ICEPAK CFD thermal model.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2015
Rory Telford, Catherine Jones, Patrick Norman, Graeme Burt
Mass and efficiency are key performance indicators for the development and design of future electric power systems (EPS) for more-electric aircraft (MEA). However, to enable consideration of high-level EPS architecture design trades, there is a requirement for modelling and simulation based analysis to support this activity. The predominant focus to date has been towards the more detailed aspects of analysis, however there is also a significant requirement to be able to perform rapid high-level trades of candidate architectures and technologies. Such a capability facilitates a better appreciation of the conflicting desires to maximise availability and efficiency in candidate MEA architectures, whilst minimising the overall system mass. It also provides a highly valuable and quantitative assessment of the systemic impact of new enabling technologies being considered for MEA applications.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2017
Devesh Kumar, Konrad Juethner, Yves Fournier
The aero engine industry is experiencing both a design renaissance and an adherence to old values in recent years. Engine manufacturers have introduced remarkable next generation capabilities by achieving thermodynamic and mechanical efficiencies and exploring novel lightweighting concepts such as the open rotor configuration [1]. At the same time, the market adheres to 50+ year-old engine concepts that have proven extremely reliable and demands continuous adaption to new applications. In either domain, it is a common problem to keep engine simulation in step with changes to design, environmental conditions, and mission data – and this applied to both actual designs and those that belong to the hypothetical design space as explored in design of experiments (DOE). We present an effective simulation process and data management (SPDM) approach that hinges on a focus on components, their generalized connections and programmatic templating.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2061
Andrew S. Babel, Parag Kshirsagar, Suman Dwari
In aerospace actuator applications electric machines are demanded to produce large static and dynamic torque while being constrained with stringent weight and volume restrictions. Among various types of electrical machines, Permanent Magnet (PM) Machines with strong rare earth magnets, offer the highest torque and power density with low rotor inertia. This paper presents design and study of three high-density PM machine topologies from the perspective of aerospace actuator applications. The machine topologies are compared with three key metrics for the same current density: torque per unit mass, torque per unit squared rotational inertia, and torque per unit volume. Such thorough comparison of these three candidates PM machine topologies for aerospace actuator application is not reported in available publications. Key requirements of specific actuation application, such as torque density and active length, are taken into account for the design.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-1997
Wei Wu, Yeong-Ren Lin, Louis Chow, Edmund Gyasi, John P. Kizito, Quinn Leland
Recently there has been increasingly research interest on aircraft electromechanical actuator (EMA) safety. One approach to prevent EMAs from overheating is to use air cooling fans. Aircraft EMA cooling fan is a critical component because an EMA failure due to overheating could lead to a catastrophic failure in aircraft. Methodology A five-blade and seven-blade dual-fan designs are proposed. Each fan has its own independent shaft running in opposite rotating directions. Fan motors are assumed to be brushless direct current (BLDC) motors. After summarizing the possible failure causes and failure modes of BLDC fans by focusing on each failure mechanism, the life expectancy of fan ball bearings based on a major failure mechanism of lubricant deterioration was calculated and compared to such information in the literature. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of three fault-tolerant approaches are discussed.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2023
Timothy Deppen, Brian Raczkowski, Marco Amrhein, Jason Wells, Eric Walters, Mark Bodie, Soumya Patnaik
Future aircraft systems are projected to have order of magnitude greater power and thermal demands, along with tighter constraints on the performance of the power and thermal management subsystems. This trend has led to the need for a fully integrated design process where power and thermal systems, and their interactions, are considered simultaneously. To support this new design paradigm, the power quality analysis framework, developed previously, has been augmented to include thermal specifications. MIL-STD-2218 defines thermal design and cooling analysis requirements for airborne electrical equipment, while MIL-STD-704 defines transient, steady-state, and frequency-domain metrics for power quality. The proposed framework augments the power quality analysis framework developed for MIL-STD-704 and others, with a mathematical interpretation of the requirements given in MIL-STD-2218.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2033
Rudolf Neydorf, Ivan Chernogorov, Victor Polyakh, Orkhan Yarakhmedov, Julia Goncharova, Anna Neydorf
Experimental and computer modelling of statics and dynamics of vehicles may cause difficulties related with significant non-linearity of dependencies included in a model. This is due to the mechanical effects of friction, backlash etc., aerodynamic effects and other physical phenomena. Mathematical modeling of such objects is most frequently connected with mathematical processing of experimental data. Obtained pointlike dependencies of output variables on input ones are strongly nonlinear, piecewise, sometimes discontinuous. Approximation of these dependencies using polynomial resolution or spline-functions is problematic and may cause low accuracy. A radically new solution of this problem was suggested in the article [Neydorf, R., "Bivariate “Cut-Glue” Approximation of Strongly Nonlinear Mathematical Models Based on Experimental Data," SAE Int. J. Aerosp. 8(1):2015, doi:10.4271/2015-01-2394].
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2022
Ajay Rao, Vivek Karan, Pradeep Kumar
Turbulence is by far the number one concern of anxious passengers and a cause for airline injuries. Apart from causing discomfort to passengers, it also results in unplanned downtime of aircrafts. Currently the Air Traffic Control (ATC) and the meteorological weather charts aid the pilot in devising flight paths that avoid turbulent regions. Even with such tailored flight paths, pilots report constant encounters with turbulence. Turbulence avoidance can be made much more accurate by the use of predictive models that exploit patterns found in historical and transactional data. This paper proposes the use of such predictive analysis algorithms on meteorological data over the geographical area where the flight is intended to fly.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1941
Tie Wang, Xin Gao, Zhiwei Zhang
Vehicle hydraulic retarder is applied in heavy-duty trucks and buses as an auxiliary braking device. In traditional cooling system of hydraulic retarder, working fluid is introduced into heat exchanger to transfer heat to cooling liquid in circulation, whose heat is then dissipated by engine cooling system, not enabling waste heat of working fluid used effectively. In hydraulic retarder cooling system based on Rankine cycle, organic working fluid transfers heat with hydraulic retarder working fluid in Rankine cycle, and then outputs power through expansion machine. It can both reduce heat load of engine cooling system, and enhance thermal stability of hydraulic retarder while recovering and utilizing braking energy. First of all, according to the target vehicle model, hydraulic retarder cooling system model based on Rankine cycle is established.
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