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2017-09-28 ...
  • September 28-29, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Forth Worth, Texas
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
This interactive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) product and process seminar introduces the participant to the analytical process by which potential failure modes, failure effects and causes of failure are identified. Engaging in a systematic method of studying failure can improve future outcomes. The severity, occurrence and probability of detection of a failure mode are used to prioritize which failure modes are most critical. Methodology is introduced for dealing with the effects of failure. The Design FMEA link to manufacturing is explained and amplified in terms of downstream Process FMEA.
2017-09-21 ...
  • September 21-22, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Engine failures can occur in a variety of equipment, vehicles, and applications. On occasion, a single vehicle type or equipment family will even experience multiple engine failures leading to the inevitable need to determine what the most likely cause of one or all of those failures was. This comprehensive seminar introduces participants to the methods and techniques used to understand the types of variables and inputs that can affect engine reliability and then determine the most likely cause of an individual engine or group of engine failures in the field.
2017-08-16 ...
  • August 16-18, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • December 13-15, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
RMS (Reliability-Maintainability-Safety-Supportability) engineering is emerging as the newest discipline in product development due to new credible, accurate, quantitative methods. Weibull Analysis is foremost among these new tools. New and advanced Weibull techniques are a significant improvement over the original Weibull approach. This workshop, originally developed by Dr. Bob Abernethy, presents special methods developed for these data problems, such as Weibayes, with actual case studies in addition to the latest techniques in SuperSMITH® Weibull for risk forecasts with renewal and optimal component replacement.
2017-07-26 ...
  • July 26-August 11, 2017 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is an integral part of product design activity applicable to any type of product or service. It is a quantitative and quantitative step-by-step approach for identifying and analyzing all actual and potential points of failure in a design, product or service. A successful team-based FMEA activity can use their collective experience with similar products to dramatically improve not only product performance but also reduce manufacturing issues at both a component and system and processing level. This web seminar introduces the five basic types of FMEAs with emphasis on constructing a Design FMEA.
2017-06-26 ...
  • June 26-30, 2017 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
  • December 4-7, 2017 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Design Review Based on Failure Modes (DRBFM) is a methodology focused on change management and continuous improvement. It centers on early prevention and engineering knowledge, eliminating time spent debating ranking systems, waiting for lead engineers to document and list their concerns, identifying what types of concerns are open for discussion and resolution, and brainstorming without any actionable closure. This web seminar will explain all phases of the DRBFM methodology and provide details on how to accomplish the specific steps.
2017-06-17
Journal Article
2017-01-9550
David Neihguk, M. L. Munjal, Arvind Ram, Abhinav Prasad
Abstract A production muffler of a 2.2 liter compression ignition engine is analyzed using plane wave (Transfer Matrix) method. The objective is to show the usefulness of plane wave models to analyze the acoustic performance (Transmission Loss, TL) of a compact hybrid muffler (made up of reactive and dissipative elements). The muffler consists of three chambers, two of which are acoustically short in the axial direction. The chambers are separated by an impervious baffle on the upstream side and a perforated plate on the downstream side. The first chamber is a Concentric Tube Resonator (CTR). The second chamber consists of an extended inlet and a flow reversal 180-degree curved outlet duct. The acoustic cavity in the third chamber is coupled with the second chamber through the acoustic impedances of the end plate and the perforated plate.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1842
Akin Oktav, Cetin Yilmaz, Gunay Anlas
As a countermeasure to trunk lid slam noise, reactive openings are used in the trunk cavities of passenger vehicles. In sedans trunk and cabin cavities are coupled acoustically through discontinuities on the parcel shelf and/or the rear seat. In such a case, these openings behave as if necks of a Helmholtz resonator, which in turn change the acoustic response of the system, accordingly. The Helmholtz resonator effect of the trunk cavity is discussed analytically through a simplified cavity model. A case study is also given, where the acoustic response of a sedan is analyzed through the computational model that considers the resonator effect. Sound pressure level results show that instant pressure drops and damping effects observed in the acoustic response can be explained with the resonator effect. Results obtained from the computational model of the sedan are verified by road test measurements
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1848
Richard DeJong
From 1983 to 1995, Richard H. Lyon published several papers on Statistical Phase Analysis, showing that the average phase of the transfer functions in complex systems grows with frequency in proportion to the modal density of the system. In one dimensional systems this phase growth is the same as that of freely propagating waves. However, in two and three dimensional systems this phase growth is much larger than the corresponding freely propagating wave. Recent work has shown that these phase growth functions can be used as mode shape functions in discrete system models to obtain results consistent with Statistical Energy Analysis. This paper reviews these results and proposes naming the statistical mode shape functions in honor of Lyon.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1856
Junji Yoshida, Koki Tanaka, Rie Nakamoto, Ken Fukasawa
Operational transfer path analysis (TPA) is one of TPA methods recently developed. This method calculates contributions of reference points (e.g., engine mount) to the response point (e.g., vehicle interior noise/vibration) using only the operational data. Through this operational TPA (OTPA), effective noise/vibration reduction can be achieved. On the other hand, many accurate vibraton modes can be obtained recently by the progress of CAE technique. However, it is not eacy to find out which calculated vibration modes of the structure (e.g., vehicle flame) affect the response point (e.g., steering) largely. In this study, we then combined the OTPA technique with CAE to obtain high contributing mode. As the test structure, a rear flame of a small constraction machine model was employed. Firstly, the vibration modes were obtained by CAE (eigenmode analysis) and 25 modes were obtaiend under 250 Hz. Subsequently, operational vibration of the structure was measured.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1804
Chulwoo Jung, Hyeon Seok Kim, Hyuckjin Oh, Kwang Hyeon Hwang, Hun Park
An efficient method to determine bush stiffness of passenger cars for satisfying requirement of noise and vibration is developed. In general, a passenger vehicle includes various types of bush to connect systems and control forces (loads) transferred between systems which affect characteristics of noise and vibration of the vehicle. Noise and vibration of a vehicle are mainly caused by forces from power train (engine and transmission) and road excitation. While a vehicle is in operation, road excitation is applied to the vehicle through bushes. If a bush transfers less force to the body structure, levels of noise and vibration will be decreased. In other words, it is necessary to well determine characteristics of bushes when developing passenger vehicles. Bush stiffness is one of key factors to affect the performance of noise and vibration of the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1780
Yong Xu
Research Objective: For MT vehicles, gearbox rattle is a common NVH problem which influences the comfort level of vehicle. In order to prevent rattle in the design phase of vehicle, this work aimed to study the excitation mechanism and influence factors of gearbox rattle, and then to propose effective measures. Methodology: First, the root cause of gearbox rattle problem was studied with the aid of classical dynamical theories. And then the simulation model of vehicle powertrain system was built via Matlab-Simulink. Then some critical parameters of the model and some experiential optimum proposals were selected to perform a sensitivity analysis on the torsional vibration, which is the root cause of rattle. Referring the simulation results, the dual-mass flywheel was selected as the most effective solution to gearbox rattle. Results: The simulation results indicated the critical parameters for optimization to prevent gearbox rattle problem in the design phase of the vehicle.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1803
John Van Baren
The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation addresses three fundamental questions about developing accelerated random vibration stress tests. Question#1: What random profile is needed (and for how much time) to accurately simulate the end use environment over the life-cycle of my product? Question #2: My product operates in many different vibration environments, how can I confidently combine them into one accelerated test?Question #3: How can I use the FDS to accelerate my test?
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1851
Taewook Yoo, Ronald W. Gerdes, Seungkyu Lee, Daniel Stanley, Thomas Herdtle, Georg Eichhorn
Several methods for evaluating damping material performance are commonly used, such as Oberst beam test, power injection method and the long bar test. Among these test methods, the Oberst beam test method has been widely used in the automotive industry and elsewhere as a standard method, allowing for slight bar dimension differences. However, questions have arisen as to whether this Oberst test result reflect real applications. Therefore, the long bar test method has been introduced and has been used in the aerospace industry for some time. In addition to the larger size bar in the long bar test, there are a few differences between Oberst (cantilever) and long bar test (center-driven) methods. In this paper, the differences between Oberst and long bar test methods will be discussed both experimentally and numerically using Finite Element Analysis. Furthermore, guidelines for a long bar test method will be provided.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1901
Christian Glandier, Stefanie Grollius
With the reduction of engine noise in internal combustion engines and the advent of alternative propulsion systems, road noise has become the major source of interior noise in urban and suburban driving in the low frequency range. The challenges of weight reduction, performance improvement and reduced development time call for stronger support of the development process by numerical methods. The long and complex transfer paths from the road surface to the occupants’ ears through tire, chassis, bushings, body, trim and air cavity make such a prediction a non-trivial task. This starts with the tire. Tire manufacturers have a thorough knowledge of their product and the physics involved in its behavior and deploy refined simulation techniques. However, interfacing difficulties between tire simulation and vehicle simulation very often lead to unnecessary losses in accuracy.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1839
Edward T. Lee
It is common for automotive manufacturers and off-highway machinery manufacturers to gain an insight of the system structural dynamics by evaluating the system inertance functions near the mount locations. The acoustic response at the operator’s ears is a function of the vibro-acoustic characteristics of the system structural dynamics interacting with the cavity, with the actual load applied at the mount locations. The overall vibro-acoustic characteristics can be influenced by the change in local stiffness. To analyze the response of a system, it is necessary to go beyond analyzing its transfer functions. The actual load needs to be understood and be applied towards the transfer function set. Finite element (FE) based analysis provides a good foundation for deterministic solutions. However finite element method suffers in accuracy as the frequency increases. Many NVH problems happen to be at the mid frequency range where solving the problem with the FE-only approach falls short.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1857
Joshua R. Goossens, William Mars, Guy Smith, Paul Heil, Scott Braddock, Jeanette Pilarski
Tenneco is using fe-safe/rubber to implement fatigue analysis capabilities and workflows that offer unprecedented control over durability issues in development programs.  The implementation includes a new materials testing facility that can measure the parameters governing elastomer fatigue behavior.  Our lab measures the fatigue crack growth rate curve, crack precursor size, strain crystallization function, and cyclic stress-strain curves.  The measurement and computational capabilities are demonstrated here for a series of uniaxial, biaxial and triaxial load cases on a Front Lower Control Arm vertical ride bushing.  Abaqus was used to obtain the strain history for each load case, and fe-safe/rubber has been used to compute fatigue life and failure mode.  For each case, we present the results of fe-safe/rubber’s Critical Plane Analysis, illustrating the insights that the analysis provides in tracing the development of damage in the bushing.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1791
David Neihguk, Shreyas Fulkar
Parametric model of a production hybrid (made up of reactive and dissipative elements) muffler for tractor engine is developed to compute the acoustic Transmission Loss (TL). The objective is to simplify complex muffler acoustic simulations without any loss of accuracy, robustness and usability so that it is accessible to all product development engineers and designers. The parametric model is a 3D Finite Element Method (FEM) based built in COMSOL model builder which is then converted into a user-friendly application (App) using COMSOL App builder. The uniqueness of the App lies in its ability to handle not only wide range of parametric variations but also variations in the physics and boundary conditions. This enables designers to explore various design options in the early design phase without the need to have deep expertise in a specific simulation tool nor in numerical acoustic modeling.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1764
Himanshu Amol Dande, Tongan Wang, John Maxon, Joffrey Bouriez
The demand for quieter interior cabin spaces among business jet customers has created an increased need for more accurate prediction tools. In this paper the authors will discuss a collaborative effort between Jet Aviation and Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation to develop a Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model of a large commercial business jet. To have an accurate prediction, it is critical to accurately model the structural and acoustic subsystems, critical noise transmission paths and dominant noise sources on the aircraft. The geometry in the SEA model was developed using 3D CAD models of major airframe and interior cabin components. The noise transmission path was characterized through extensive testing of various aircraft components in the Gulfstream Acoustic Test Facility. Material definitions developed from these tests became input parameters in the SEA model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1751
Nicolas Schaefer, Bart Bergen, Tomas Keppens, Wim Desmet
The continuous pursuit for lighter, more affordable and more silent cars, has pushed OEMs into optimizing the design of car components. The different panels surrounding the car interior cavity such as firewall, door or floor panels are of key importance to the NV performance. The design of the sound packages for high-frequency airborne input is well established. However, the design for the mid-frequency range is more difficult, because of the complex inputs involved, the lack of representative performance metrics and its high computational cost. In order to make early decisions for package design, performance maps based on the different design parameters are desired for mid-frequencies. This paper presents a framework to retrieve the response surface, from a numerical design space of finite-element frequency sweeps. This response surface describes the performance of a sound package against the different design variables.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1788
Kishore Chand Ulli, Upender Rao Gade
Automotive window buffeting is a source of vehicle occupant's discomfort and annoyance. Original equipment manufacturers (OEM) are using both experimental and numerical methods to address this issue. With major advances in computational power and numerical modelling, it is now possible to model complex aero acoustic problems using numerical tools like CFD. Although the direct turbulence model LES is preferred to simulate aero-acoustic problems, it is computationally expensive for many industrial applications. Hybrid turbulence models can be used to model aero acoustic problems for industrial applications. In this paper, the numerical modelling of side window buffeting in a generic passenger car is presented. The numerical modelling is performed with the hybrid turbulence model Scale Adaptive Simulation (SAS) using a commercial CFD code.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1834
Dirk von Werne, Prasanna Chaduvula, Patrick Stahl, Michael Jordan, Jamison Huber, Korcan Kucukcoskun, Mircea Niculescu
Fan noise can form a significant part of the vehicle noise signature and needs hence to be optimized in view of exterior noise and operator exposure. Putting together unsteady CFD simulation with acoustic FEM modeling, tonal and broadband fan noise can be accurately predicted, accounting for the sound propagation through engine compartment and vehicle frame structure. This paper focuses on method development and validation in view of the practical vehicle design process. In a step by-step approach, the model has been validated against a dedicated test-set-up, so that good accuracy of operational fan noise prediction could be achieved. Main focus was on the acoustic transfer through the engine compartment. The equivalent acoustic transfer through radiators/heat exchangers is modeled based on separate detailed acoustic models. The updating process revealed the sensitivity of various components in the engine compartment.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1840
Thierry Bourdon, Rainer Weber, Johann Massinger
Nowadays, the automotive industry is increasingly facing of reducing vibration & noise in the vehicle. More particularly on the engine area, the development of fuel components based on high pressure pumps, rails, any pipes and injectors are a subject of a particular NVH attention. The use of modern digital techniques such as 3D finite element vibroacoustic, leads to use virtual prototyping as complementary to traditional real hardware prototypes development. Among interest, number of iterative loops to reach a best design brings an important value to new product development with an optimized cost. Basically the core part of virtual prototyping is about 3D finite element models for each component. It is quite challenging to establish these models, as they must mimic the entire physical phenomenon of real structure borne hardwares sound in the whole audible frequency range.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1850
Samaneh Arabi, Glen Steyer, Zhaohui Sun, Jeffrey Nyquist
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirement for 54.5mpg by 2025 to reduce greenhouse gases has pushed the industry to look for alternative fuels to run vehicles. Electricity is of those green energies that can help auto industry to achieve those strict requirements. However, the electric or hybrid-electric vehicles brought new challenges into science and engineering world including the Noise and Vibration issues which are usually tied up with both airborne and structural noises. The electromagnetic force plays a significant role in acoustic noise radiation in the electric motor which is an air-gap radial Maxwell force. This paper describes an innovative approach to model the physics of noise radiated by the electric motor.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1846
Fabio Bianciardi, Karl Janssens, Konstantinos Gryllias, Simone Delvecchio, Claudio Manna
The noise radiated by an ICE engine results from a mixture of various complex sources such as combustion, injection, piston slap, turbocharger, etc. Some of these have been categorized as combustion related noise and others as mechanical noise. Of great concern is the assessment of combustion noise which, under some operating conditions, is likely to predominate over the other sources of noise. The residual noise, produced by various other sources, is commonly referred to as mechanical noise. Being able to extract combustion and mechanical noise is of prime interest in the development phase of the engine and also for diagnostic purposes. This paper presents the application of combustion mechanical noise separation techniques on a V8 engine. Two techniques, namely the classical Wiener filter and cyclostationary Wiener filter, have been investigated. The techniques have been applied to microphone recordings measured at one meter distance from the engine running on a test bench.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1845
Jon Furlich, Jason Blough, Darrell Robinette
When subjected to high speeds and high torques, a vehicle driveshaft and other powertrain components experience an increase in stored potential energy. When the engine and driveshaft are decoupled during an up or down shift, the potential energy is released causing clutch clatter during the shift event. A smooth shift is desired by the customer thus reduction of the clutch clatter will improve customer experience and satisfaction. In this study, a six speed MT, RWD passenger car was used to experimentally capture acoustic and vibration data during the clutch clatter event. To successfully replicate the in-situ results additional data was collected and analyzed for powertrain component roll, and pitch from the test vehicle. These boundary conditions were applied to a reduced car model in a lab environment to successfully replicate the clutch clatter event on a stationary test stand.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1871
Nobutaka Tsujiuchi, Masahiro Akei, Akihito Ito, Daisuke Kubota, Koichi Osamura
This paper describes new method for selecting optimal field points in Inverse-Numerical Acoustic analysis (INA), and an application to construction of sound source model for diesel engine. INA is a method that identifies surface vibration of the sound source by using acoustic transfer functions and actual sound pressures which are measured at field points located near the sound source. In the INA, for measuring sound pressures, it is necessary to determine the arrangement of field points. The increase of field points leads to longer test and analysis time. Therefore, guidelines for deciding field point arrangement are needed to conduct INA efficiently. The authors focused on the standard deviations of distance between sound source elements and field points, and proposed new guideline for optimal selection of the field points, in a past study. In the past study, the effectiveness of this guideline was verified using a simple plate model.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1888
Rasheed Khan, Mahdi Ali, Eric C. Frank
Vehicle voice recognition systems have become an essential tool for hands free communication. As such, it has become more and more important to have reliable, consistent voice recognition in a vehicle. Vehicle voice recognition system performance is based on a variety of factors, including the speakers' gender & background noise. Male and female voice characteristics are inherently different, and some of these variations are investigated in this work. In this work, three vehicles have been tested during five different steady state road conditions (70 mph, 45 mph, Idle HVAC off, Idle HVAC on, vehicle off). Twelve speakers (six male and six female) were recorded announcing twenty mono- and multi-syllable call commands. Each speaker was recorded three times for repeatability, along with the vehicle voice recognition system response. Based on the resulting success rates, the least-recognized commands were synthesized to resemble the best detected commands from the different genders.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1843
Taejin Shin, Jaemin Jin, Sang Kwon Lee, Insoo Jung
This paper presents the influence of radiated noise from engine surface depending on assembly condition between engine block and oil pan. At the first, force at the crank bearing is obtained from multi-body dynamics model. Secondly, modal analysis is operated to define mode contribution and modal participation factors at the Structure – FEM model for virtual cylinder block. Thirdly, the radiated noise is calculated by Acoustic-FEM. Above procedure is applied at rigid connection model and sandwich panel connection model. Connection properties are applied between engine block and oil pan. Finally, the sound quality of the radiated noise at each condition are compared.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1849
Laurent Gagliardini, Romain Leneveu, Aurélien Cloix, Alexandre Durr
The door response to audio excitation contributes to the overall performance of the audio system on several items. First, acting as a cabinet, it influences the loudspeaker response. Second, due to the door inner panel radiation, the radiated power is disturbed. A third effect is the regular occurrence of squeak and rattle, that will not be considered at this stage. Design issues regarding these attributes are numerous, from the loudspeaker design to door structure and trim definition. Modeling then appears as an unavoidable tool to handle the acoustic response of the loudspeaker in its actual surrounding.
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