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2017-12-04 ...
  • December 4-15, 2017 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used by engineers as a design tool in new product development since the early 1990's. Until recently, most FEA applications have been limited to static analysis due to the cost and complexity of advanced types of analyses. Progress in the commercial FEA software and in computing hardware has now made it practical to use advanced types as an everyday design tool of design engineers. In addition, competitive pressures and quality requirements demand a more in-depth understanding of product behavior under real life loading conditions.
2017-10-16 ...
  • October 16-27, 2017 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been widely implemented by automotive companies and is used by design engineers as a tool during the product development process. Design engineers analyze their own designs while they are still in the form of easily modifiable CAD models to allow for quick turnaround times and to ensure prompt implementation of analysis results in the design process.
2017-09-28 ...
  • September 28-29, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Forth Worth, Texas
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
This interactive Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) product and process seminar introduces the participant to the analytical process by which potential failure modes, failure effects and causes of failure are identified. Engaging in a systematic method of studying failure can improve future outcomes. The severity, occurrence and probability of detection of a failure mode are used to prioritize which failure modes are most critical. Methodology is introduced for dealing with the effects of failure. The Design FMEA link to manufacturing is explained and amplified in terms of downstream Process FMEA.
2017-09-21 ...
  • September 21-22, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Engine failures can occur in a variety of equipment, vehicles, and applications. On occasion, a single vehicle type or equipment family will even experience multiple engine failures leading to the inevitable need to determine what the most likely cause of one or all of those failures was. This comprehensive seminar introduces participants to the methods and techniques used to understand the types of variables and inputs that can affect engine reliability and then determine the most likely cause of an individual engine or group of engine failures in the field.
2017-09-16
Journal Article
2017-01-9181
Zhongming Xu, Nengfa Tao, Minglei Du, Tao Liang, Xiaojun Xia
Abstract A coupled magnetic-thermal model is established to study the reason for the damage of the starter motor, which belongs to the idling start-stop system of a city bus. A finite element model of the real starter motor is built, and the internal magnetic flux density nephogram and magnetic line distribution chart of the motor are attained by simulation. Then a model in module Transient Thermal of ANSYS is established to calculate the stator and rotor loss, the winding loss and the mechanical loss. Three kinds of losses are coupled to the thermal field as heat sources in two different conditions. The thermal field and the components’ temperature distribution in the starting process are obtained, which are finally compared with the already-burned motor of the city bus in reality to predict the damage. The analysis method proposed is verified to be accurate and reliable through comparing the actual structure with the simulation results.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0028
Adèle Poubeau, Stephane Jay, Anthony Robert, Edouard Nicoud, Christian Angelberger
A speed transient performed in a four-valve single cylinder optical gasoline engine under motored conditions is investigated by means of an experimental campaign and Large-Eddy Simulations. Thorough analysis of the flow phenomena is performed, including characterization of kinetic energy, tumble ratios and velocity fields. Comparison between experimental and numerical results shows that high-fidelity simulations are able to capture well the main features of the flow, validating the use of LES for this type of engine configuration.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0024
Andrea Piano, Federico Millo, Davide Di Nunno, Alessandro Gallone
The need for achieving a fast warm up of the exhaust system has raised in the recent years a growing interest in the adoption of Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) technology for automotive diesel engines. As a matter of fact, different measures can be adopted through VVA to accelerate the warm-up of the exhaust system, such as using hot internal Exhaust Gas Recirculation (iEGR) to heat the intake charge, especially at part load, or adopting early Exhaust Valve Opening (eEVO) timing during the expansion stroke, so to increase the exhaust gas temperature during blowdown. In this paper a simulation study is presented evaluating the impact of VVA on the exhaust temperature of a modern light duty 4-cylinder diesel engine, 1.6 liters, equipped with a Variable Geometry Turbine (VGT).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0010
Federico Millo, Luciano Rolando, Alessandro Zanelli, Francesco Pulvirenti, Matteo Cucchi, Vincenzo Rossi
This paper presents the modelling of the transient phase of catalyst heating on a high performance turbocharged spark ignition engine with the aim to accurately predict the exhaust thermal energy available at the catalyst inlet and to provide a “virtual test rig” to assess different design and calibration options. The entire transient phase starting from the engine cranking until the catalyst warm-up is completed was taken into account in the simulation and the model was validated by means of a wide data-set of experimental tests. The first step of the modelling activity was the combustion analysis during the transient phase: the burn rate was evaluated on the basis of experimental in-cylinder pressure data, taking into account both cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder variations.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0136
Kurtis James Irwin, Roy Douglas, Jonathan Stewart, Andrew Pedlow, Rose Mary Stalker, Andrew Woods
With emission legislations becoming ever more stringent there is an increased pressure on the after treatment systems and more specifically the three-way catalysts. With more recent developments in emission legislations, there is requirement for more complex after-treatment systems and understanding of the ageing process. With future legislation introducing independent inspection of emissions at any time under real world driving conditions throughout a vehicle life cycle this is going to increase the focus on understanding catalyst behaviour during any likely conditions throughout its lifetime and not just at the beginning and end. In recent years it has become a popular approach to use accelerated aging of the automotive catalysts for the development of new catalytic formulations and for homologation of new vehicle emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0132
Martin Großbichler, Zhen Zhang, Philipp Polterauer, Harald Waschl
To meet current legislation limits, modern diesel engines already achieve very low raw emission levels and utilize additional components for aftertreatment. However, during fast transients still undesired emission peaks can occur for both soot and NOx. These are caused by differences in the in-cylinder conditions between the quasi steady state engine calibration and the transient engine operation, e.g. during tip-ins. These effects become more and more important in view of future RDE emission test cycles. In this work a case study is performed to analyze the potential reduction of transient soot emissions during a specified engine maneuver. An additional target is to investigate potential benefits of a novel in-situ soot sensor based on the Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) principle which offers a high temporal resolution.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0128
Lauretta Rubino, Jan Piotr Oles, Antonino La Rocca
Environmental authorities such as EPA, VCA have enforced stringent emissions legislation governing air pollutants released into the atmosphere. Of particular interest is the challenges introduced by the limit on particulate number (PN) counting (#/km) and real driving emissions (RDE) testing; with the Euro 6c emissions legislation being shortly introduced for the gasoline direct injection engines. Gasoline particulate filters (GPF) are considered to be the most immediate solution. While engine calibration and testing over the NEDC allows the limits to be met, real driving emission and cold start represent a challenge. The present work focuses on an experimental durability study on road under real word driving conditions. Two set of experiments were carried out. The first study analyzed a Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF) (2,4 liter, diameter 5,2” round) installed in underfloor (UF) position driven for up to 200.000 km.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0125
Angelo Algieri, Pietropaolo Morrone, Jessica Settino, Teresa Castiglione, Sergio Bova
In the last years automotive researchers and manufacturers are focusing a large attention on the development and the optimisation of aftertreatment systems able to meet the ever more severe regulations on exhaust gas emissions. The scientific literature highlights that all the emission control systems require proper operating temperatures and an accurate flow control to guarantee reliable and effective processes. In particular, to assure the suitable thermal level for efficient treatments, the addition of supplemental fuel is often necessary, with a not negligible penalty on the global engine efficiency. To reduce this effect, innovative reversed flow converters have been proposed over the past few years. They are based on the cyclic inversion of the exhaust gas between the two system ends (active flow control). Conversely, unidirectional flow within the aftertreatment system represents the technical solution largely adopted in practice (passive flow control).
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0119
Jos Feijen, Gerard Klink, Ed Jong, Andreas Schmid, Niels Deen, Michael Boot
Second generation biomass is an attractive renewable feedstock for transport fuels. Its sulfur content is generally negligible and the carbon cycle is reduced from millions to tens of years. One hitherto non-valorized feedstock are so-called humins, a residual product formed in the conversion of sugars to platform chemicals, such as hydroxymethylfurfural and methoxymethylfurfural, intermediates in the production of FDCA, a building block used to produce the polyethylene furanoate (PEF) bottle by Avantium. The focus of this study is to investigate the spray combustion behavior of humins as a renewable alternative for heavy fuel oil (HFO) under large two-stroke engine-like conditions in an optically accessible constant volume chamber.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0099
Francesco Catapano, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Gasoline direct injection (GDI) allows knock tendency reduction in spark-ignition engines mainly due to the cooling effect of the in-cylinder fuel evaporation. However, the charge formation and thus the injection timing and strategies deeply affect the flame propagation and consequently the knock occurrence probability and intensity. Present work investigates the tendency to knock of a GDI engine at 1500 rpm full load under different injection strategies, single and double injections, obtained delivering the same amount of gasoline in two equal parts, the first during intake, the second during compression stroke. In these conditions, conventional and non-conventional measurements are performed on a 4-stroke, 4-cylinder, turbocharged GDI engine endowed of optical accesses to the combustion chamber.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0103
Marlene Wentsch, Marco Chiodi, Michael Bargende
Main limiting factor in the application of 3D-CFD simulations within an engine development process is the very high time demand. The computing time of a 3D-CFD simulation is predominantly influenced by the number of cells within the computational mesh. An arbitrary cell coarsening, however, results in a distinct distortion of the simulation outcome. It is rather necessary to adapt the calculation models to the new mesh structure in order to ensure reliability and predictability of the 3D-CFD engine simulation. In the last decade, a fast response 3D-CFD tool was developed at FKFS in Stuttgart. It aims for a harmonized interaction between computational mesh, implemented calculation models and defined boundary conditions in order to enable fast running simulations for engine development tasks.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0084
Giacomo Belgiorno, Nikolaos Dimitrakopoulos, Gabriele Di Blasio, Carlo Beatrice, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal
In this paper, a parametric analysis on the main engine calibration parameters applied on gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is performed. Theoretically, the PPC concept permits to improve both the engine efficiencies and the NOx–soot trade-off simultaneously compared to the conventional diesel combustion. This work is based on the design of experiments (DoE), statistical approach, and investigates on the engine calibration parameters that might affect the efficiencies and the emissions of a gasoline PPC. The full factorial DoE analysis based on three levels and three factors (33 factorial design) is performed at three engine operating conditions of the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycles (WLTC). The pilot quantity (Qpil), the crank angle position when 50% of the total heat is released (CA50), and the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) factors are considered. The goal is to identify an engine calibration with high efficiency and low emissions.
2017-08-16 ...
  • August 16-18, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • December 13-15, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
RMS (Reliability-Maintainability-Safety-Supportability) engineering is emerging as the newest discipline in product development due to new credible, accurate, quantitative methods. Weibull Analysis is foremost among these new tools. New and advanced Weibull techniques are a significant improvement over the original Weibull approach. This workshop, originally developed by Dr. Bob Abernethy, presents special methods developed for these data problems, such as Weibayes, with actual case studies in addition to the latest techniques in SuperSMITH® Weibull for risk forecasts with renewal and optimal component replacement.
2017-07-31 ...
  • July 31-August 11, 2017 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is an integral part of product design activity applicable to any type of product or service. It is a quantitative and quantitative step-by-step approach for identifying and analyzing all actual and potential points of failure in a design, product or service. A successful team-based FMEA activity can use their collective experience with similar products to dramatically improve not only product performance but also reduce manufacturing issues at both a component and system and processing level. This web seminar introduces the five basic types of FMEAs with emphasis on constructing a Design FMEA.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1938
Shyam Sunder Manivannan, Gopkumar Kuttikrishnan, Rajesh Siva, Janarthanan C, G A Ramadass
Abstract The hybrid robot will be a battery operated four wheel drive vehicle with a rigid chassis for all terrain operation. The vehicle will be suited for various payloads based on applications with geological, atmospheric sensors and buried object identification at a depth of 8 to 100 m., etc. The vehicle will be remotely controlled through a RF signal, allows it to maneuver up to 5 km. The novelty of the design, is its capability for all terrain and ease of trafficability based on skid steering, self-alignment of sensors and vehicle traction in spite of possible inverted conditions and the vehicle can travel from land, snow, water and vice versa. The vehicle could be deployed for surveying coastline of water bodies, borderlines and also be extensively used in polar region for studying glacier aging and as advance vehicle for the convoys and polar mapping.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1948
John Samuel Kopppula, Thundil Karuppa Raj Rajagopal, Edison Gundabattini
Abstract The present work is concentrated to study the effect of varying inlet pressures on the dynamics of the suction valve obtained from a hermetic reciprocating compressor. The effect of valve functioning on the efficiency of a compressor is highly acceptable. Rather than the delivery valve, the suction valve has a significant impact on the compressor efficiency. The reed valve in a hermetic compressor is a cantilever type arrangement. The valve operates due to the pressure difference between the suction muffler and the cylinder. The numerical analysis which includes Fluid-structure interaction is used in the present study. The flow and structural domain employed in the present study are modelled with Solidworks 15.0. The fluid structure interaction analysis is a combination of ANSYS Fluent and ANSYS structural. These two are coupled with a system coupling in ANSYS Workbench 16.0. The numerical results obtained from the simulation are validated with the experimental data.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1949
Johnson Jose, Ramesh M, G Venkatesan, M Khader Basha
Abstract Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are being deployed in military, law enforcement, search & rescue, scientific research, environmental & climate studies, reconnaissance and other commercial and non-commercial applications on a large scale. A design and development of landing gear system has been taken up for a UAV. This paper presents the design optimization of structural components of Wheel-Brake & Fork assembly pertaining to the Main Landing Gear (MLG) for a UAV. The wheel, fork, axle and brake unit constitute the wheel assembly. The wheel-brake assembly is assembled with the strut assembly and forms the Landing gear system. The Fork is the connecting member between the shock strut and the axle containing the wheel-brake assembly. As the fork and axle are subjected to shock loads while landing, the strength of these components are very much essential to withstand the dynamic loads.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1961
Shishir Sirohi, Saurabh Yadav, B. Ashok, V Ramesh Babu, C Kavitha, K Nantha Gopal
The main objective of the study is to design and analyze casing and supports of a transmission system for an electric vehicle. The system comprises of motors as the power source, constant mesh gear box coupled with limited slip differential as the power transmitting source. The space occupied by the transmission system is a foremost constraint in designing the system. The wear and tear in the system are caused by the gear meshing process and transmission error which lead to failure of the transmission system. This internal excitation also produces a dynamic mesh force, which is transmitted to the casing and mounts through shafts and bearings. In order to overcome such issues in a transmission system, a gear box casing, differential mounts and motor mounts have been designed by the use of CAD-modelling software “SOLIDWORKS”. The designs were imported to FEA software “ANSYS” for carrying out static structural analysis.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1922
S Nataraja Moorthy, Manchi Rao, Prasath Raghavendran, Sakthi Babu
Abstract NVH is becoming one of the major factor for customer selection of vehicle along with parameters like fuel economy and drivability. One of the major NVH challenges is to have a vehicle with aggressive drivability and at the same time with acceptable noise and vibration levels. This paper focuses on the compact utility vehicle where the howling noise is occurring at higher rpm of the engine. The vehicle is powered by three cylinder turbocharged diesel engine. The noise levels were higher above 2500 rpm due to the presence of structural resonance. Operational deflection shapes (ODS) and Transfer path analysis (TPA) analysis was done on entire vehicle and powertrain to find out the major reason for howling noise at higher engine rpm. It is observed that the major contribution for noise at higher rpm is due to modal coupling between powertrain, half shaft and vehicle sub frame.
2017-06-26 ...
  • June 26-30, 2017 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
  • December 4-7, 2017 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Design Review Based on Failure Modes (DRBFM) is a methodology focused on change management and continuous improvement. It centers on early prevention and engineering knowledge, eliminating time spent debating ranking systems, waiting for lead engineers to document and list their concerns, identifying what types of concerns are open for discussion and resolution, and brainstorming without any actionable closure. This web seminar will explain all phases of the DRBFM methodology and provide details on how to accomplish the specific steps.
2017-06-17
Journal Article
2017-01-9078
Dong Gao, MiaoHua Huang, Jiangang Xie
In order to solve the environmental pollution and energy crisis, Electric Vehicles (EVs) have been developed rapidly. Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is the key power supply equipment for EVs, and the scientific and accurate prediction of its Remaining Useful Life (RUL) has become a hot topic in the field of new energy research. The internal resistance and capacity are often used to characterize the Li-ion battery State of Health (SOH) from which RUL is obtained. However, in practical applications, it is difficult to obtain internal resistance and capacity information by using the non-intrusive measurement method. Therefore, it is necessary to extract the measurable parameters to characterize the degradation of Li-ion battery. At present, the methods of extracting health indicators based on measurable parameters have gained preliminary results, but most of them are derived from the Li-ion battery discharging data.
2017-06-17
Journal Article
2017-01-9550
David Neihguk, M. L. Munjal, Arvind Ram, Abhinav Prasad
Abstract A production muffler of a 2.2 liter compression ignition engine is analyzed using plane wave (Transfer Matrix) method. The objective is to show the usefulness of plane wave models to analyze the acoustic performance (Transmission Loss, TL) of a compact hybrid muffler (made up of reactive and dissipative elements). The muffler consists of three chambers, two of which are acoustically short in the axial direction. The chambers are separated by an impervious baffle on the upstream side and a perforated plate on the downstream side. The first chamber is a Concentric Tube Resonator (CTR). The second chamber consists of an extended inlet and a flow reversal 180-degree curved outlet duct. The acoustic cavity in the third chamber is coupled with the second chamber through the acoustic impedances of the end plate and the perforated plate.
2017-06-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-9453
Tobias Hoernig
Within the scope of today’s product development in automotive engineering the aim is to produce more light and solid parts with higher capabilities. On the one hand lightweight materials such as aluminum or magnesium are used, but on the other hand, increased stresses on these components cause higher bolt forces in joining technology. Therefore screws with very high strength rise in importance. At the same time, users need reliable and effective design methods to develop new products at reasonable cost in short time. The bolted joints require a special structural design of the thread engagement in low-strength components. Hence an extension of existing dimensioning of the thread engagement for modern requirements is necessary. In the context of this contribution, this will be addressed in two dimensions: on one hand extreme situations (low strength nut components and high-strength fasteners) are considered.
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