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2016-12-05 ...
  • December 5-16, 2016 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used by engineers as a design tool in new product development since the early 1990's. Until recently, most FEA applications have been limited to static analysis due to the cost and complexity of advanced types of analyses. Progress in the commercial FEA software and in computing hardware has now made it practical to use advanced types as an everyday design tool of design engineers. In addition, competitive pressures and quality requirements demand a more in-depth understanding of product behavior under real life loading conditions.
2016-11-08 ...
  • November 8-18, 2016 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been widely implemented by automotive companies and is used by design engineers as a tool during the product development process. Design engineers analyze their own designs while they are still in the form of easily modifiable CAD models to allow for quick turnaround times and to ensure prompt implementation of analysis results in the design process.
2016-09-16
Technical Paper
2016-01-9017
Dr Janka Cafolla, Derick Smart, Barry Warner
The lifting and excavating industry are not as advanced as automotive in the use of modern CAE tools in the early stages of design and development of heavy machinery. There is still a lack of confidence in the integrity of the results from FE simulations and optimisation and this becomes a barrier to the adoption of virtual prototyping for vehicle verification. R&D of Tata Steel has performed tests on two forklift truck overhead guards supplied by a major manufacturer. Based on the international standard for Falling Object Protective Structures (FOPS) as an initial input to the method of testing, the main aim of this study was to generate as much test data as possible to correlate the Finite Element (FE) simulations of two tests - a static and a dynamic test. The static test was developed to deform the overhead guard plastically in a slow controlled manner, so it would be easier to correlate the measured data to FE simulation.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1777
Sebastian Oberst, Zhi Zhang, Joseph CS Lai
Abstract Despite significant progress made in the past 20 years in discovering some of the mechanisms of brake squeal, it remains difficult to predict the underlying friction-induced instabilities reliably. Most numerical analyses are based on linear deterministic analyses of structural vibrations such as the complex eigenvalue analysis (CEA). However, nonlinear multi-scale processes govern friction contact with high sensitivities to operating and/or environmental conditions. In addition, uncertainties in the material properties and boundary conditions such as contact and friction laws are rarely considered. Hence, it is quite common to underpredict or overpredict the number of instabilities and extensive brake noise dynamometer tests are still required in industry to ensure acceptable brake noise performance. In this paper, simplified finite element brake models are used to illustrate the role of nonlinearity in brake squeal.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1780
Francesca Ronzio, Theophane Courtois
Abstract In automotive acoustics, body NVH design is traditionally carried out without considering the acoustic trim parts. Nevertheless, the vibro-acoustic interaction of body structure and insulation trim cannot be neglected in the middle frequency range, where structure borne propagation might still be dominating and where classical statistical approaches are generally not able to represent the influence of local changes in stiffness and damping. This, together with the market requirement of lightweight and more efficient sound package solutions, is leading the CAE engineers to evaluate new design approaches dedicated to vehicle components such as dash or floor systems, for which the multi-physics interaction between damping, body stiffness and trim impedance is important.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1813
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza
Abstract The characteristics of the intake system affect both engine power output and gas-dynamic noise emissions. The latter is particularly true in downsized VVA engines, where a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves is realized, due to the intake line de-throttling at part-load. For this engine architecture, a refined air-box design is hence requested. In this work, the Transmission Loss (TL) of the intake air-box of a commercial VVA engine is numerically computed through a 3D FEM approach. Results are compared with experimental data, showing a very good correlation. The validated model is then coupled to an external optimizer (ModeFRONTIERTM) to increase the TL parameter in a prefixed frequency range. The improvement of the acoustic attenuation is attained through a shape deformation of the inner structure of the base device, taking into account constraints related to the device installation inside the engine bay.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1819
Antonio J. Torregrosa, Alberto Broatch, Vincent Raimbault, Jerome Migaud
Abstract Intake noise has become one the main concerns in the design of highly-supercharged downsized engines, which are expected to play a significant role in the upcoming years. Apart from the low frequencies associated with engine breathing, in these engines other frequency bands are also relevant which are related to the turbocharger operation, and which may radiate from the high-pressure side from the compressor outlet to the charge air cooler. Medium frequencies may be controlled with the use of different typologies of resonators, but these are not so effective for relatively high frequencies. In this paper, the potential of the use of multi-layer porous materials to control those high frequencies is explored. The material sheets are located in the side chamber of an otherwise conventional resonator, thus providing a compact, lightweight and convenient arrangement.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1857
Ettore Lappano, Frank Naets, Martijn Vermaut, Wim Desmet, Domenico Mundo
Abstract This paper proposes a specific parametric model order reduction (pMOR) scheme for the efficient evaluation of beam based structures. The model to be parameterized is a Finite Element (FE) model that represents a generic network of beams with a number of distinct cross-section types. The methodology considers geometrical parameters that describe the cross-section and the material properties of the beams as the design parameters of interest. An affine representation of the model is derived based on the description of the deformation of a uniform beam. This affine representation can be exploited for the hyper-reduction where the evaluation cost of the system matrices is reduced. The reduction of the system matrices is obtained through a projection based approach. For a given number of parameter combinations a modal basis is constructed. A global reduced order basis (ROB) is obtained through a principal component analysis of these local bases.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1849
Arnaud Caillet, Luca Alimonti, Anton Golota
Abstract The need for the industry to simulate and optimize the acoustic trim parts has increased during the last decade. There are many approaches to integrate the effect of an acoustic trim in a finite element model. These approaches can be very simple and empirical like the classical non-structural mass (NSM) combined to a high acoustic damping value in the receiver cavity to much more detailed and complex approach like the Poro-Elastic Materials (PEM) method using the Biot parameters. The objective of this paper is to identify which approach is the most appropriate in given situations. This article will first make a review of the theory behind the different methods (NSM, Impedances, Transfer Matrix Method, PEM). Each of them will be investigated for the different typical trim families used in the automotive industry: absorber, spring/mass, spring/mass/absorber.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1168
Dennis Kuhl, Ludwig Brabetz, Mohamed Ayeb
Abstract The development of battery electric vehicle drives comes along with comprehensive and time-consuming finite element methods and extensive measurement campaigns. The drive efficiency has drawn great attention from engineers and customers, because it influences the size of the drive, the cooling measures and the vehicle range. Indirect efficiency acquisition accomplished by comparing inward and outward power, has a low accuracy which arises from a relatively small difference between inward and outward power of highly efficient drives. Therefore the indirect efficiency acquisition is insufficient to evaluate advanced development measures.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1075
Jonathan Plail, Petr Grinac, Helen Ballard
Abstract In this paper, a mathematical model for simulating the 3D dynamic response of a valve spring is described. The 3D model employs a ‘geometrically exact’ 3D beam connected between each mass of the discretised mass-elastic system. Shear deformations within the beam are also considered, which makes it a Timoshenko type finite element. Results from the 3D model are compared with results from a more conventional 1D model. To validate the results further, some results are compared with real test data that was gathered during a technical consulting project. In this project, a prototype valvetrain that was originally giving acceptable durability began to wear the spring seats when a new batch of springs were procured and tested. 1D and 3D simulation results were used to help understand the cause of the failure and to make recommendations to resolve the issue. Results showed that the 3D model was able to predict the spring seat loads with greater precision than the 1D spring could.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1060
Arnab Ganguly, Niket Bhatia, Vikas Kumar Agarwal, Ulhas Mohite
Abstract With ride comfort in a motorcycle gaining significance, it is important to minimize vibration levels at the customer touch points. The reciprocating piston imparts rotary motion to the crankshaft which in turn induces unbalance forces and produces vibration in the vehicle, thus influencing the ride quality. Generally, the primary inertial forces are balanced by a combination of balancer body and crank web. However, being a commuter bike, a balancer body could not be accommodated due to cost and space constraints. In such scenario, the first order unbalance force cannot be completely eliminated but can only be redistributed by adding counterweight to the crankshaft. Proper distribution of these forces is required for optimum vibration levels at motorcycle touch sensitive points (TSP) such as handle bar, footrest etc.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1085
Ming Chen, Yanjun Wang, Wenrui Wu, Quan Cui, Kai Wang, Lingfang Wang
Abstract The present paper describes a CAE analysis approach to evaluate the thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) of the cylinder head of a turbo charged GDI engine with integrated exhaust manifold. It allows design engineers to identify structural weakness at the early stage or to find the root cause of cylinder head TMF failures. At SAIC Motor, in test validation phase a newly developed engine must pass a strict durability test on test bed under thermal cycling conditions so that the durability characteristics can be evaluated. The accelerated dynamometer test is so designed that it gives equivalent cumulative damage as what would occur in the field. The duty cycle includes rated speed full load, rated speed motored and idle speed conditions. A transient none-linear finite element method is used to calculate the plastic deformation and thermal mechanical behaviors of the cylinder head assembly during thermal cycling.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1520
Gunti R. Srinivas, Anindya Deb, Clifford C. Chou
Abstract The present work is concerned with the objective of design optimization of an automotive front end structure meeting both occupant and pedestrian safety requirements. The main goal adopted here is minimizing the mass of the front end structure meeting the safety requirements without sacrificing the performance targets. The front end structure should be sufficiently stiff to protect the occupant by absorbing the impact energy generated during a high speed frontal collision and at the same time it should not induce unduly high impact loads during a low speed pedestrian collision. These two requirements are potentially in conflict with each other; however, there may exist an optimum design solution, in terms of mass of front end structure, that meets both the requirements.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1535
Linli Tian, Yunkai Gao
Abstract Based on equivalent static loads method (ESL), a nonlinear dynamic topology optimization is carried out to optimize an automotive body in white (BIW) subjected to representative legislative crash loads, including frontal impact, side barrier impact, roof crush and rear impact. To meet the crashworthiness performances, two evaluation indexes are defined to convert the practical engineering problems into mathematic optimization problems. The strain energy is treated as the stiffness evaluation index of the BIW and the relative displacement is employed as the compliance index of the components and parts.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1534
Rudolf Reichert, Pradeep Mohan, Dhafer Marzougui, Cing-Dao Kan, Daniel Brown
Abstract A detailed finite element model of a 2012 Toyota Camry was developed by reverse engineering. The model consists of 2.25M elements representing the geometry, thicknesses, material characteristics, and connections of relevant structural, suspension, and interior components of the mid-size sedan. This paper describes the level of detail of the simulation model, the validation process, and how it performs in various crash configurations, when compared to full scale test results. Under contract with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the Center for Collision Safety and Analysis (CCSA) team at the George Mason University has developed a fleet of vehicle models which has been made publicly available. The updated model presented is the latest finite element vehicle model with a high level of detail using state of the art modeling techniques.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1508
Gernot Pauer, Michal Kriska, Andreas Hirzer
Abstract Active bonnet safety systems are implemented into vehicles, to fulfill pedestrian head impact requirements despite little available deformation space. For such systems it is necessary to consider a variety of aspects already from the very beginning of the vehicle design process and the functionality of the whole system needs to be continually cross-checked throughout the whole design process. Many of these aspects are already supported by finite element (FE) methods from vehicle manufacturers and in this paper it is shown, how the last missing links within the development process, the optimization of pedestrian detection sensor signals can also be efficiently supported by FE simulation. The modeling and validation of a pressure tube based sensor system and so called “misuse objects” are demonstrated.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1575
Federico Ballo, Roberto Frizzi, Gianpiero Mastinu, Donato Mastroberti, Giorgio Previati, Claudio Sorlini
Abstract In this paper the lightweight design and construction of road vehicle aluminum wheels is dealt with, referring particularly to safety. Dedicated experimental tests aimed at assessing the fatigue life behavior of aluminum alloy A356 - T6 have been performed. Cylindrical specimens have been extracted from three different locations in the wheel. Fully reversed strain-controlled and load-controlled fatigue tests have been performed and the stress/strain-life curves on the three areas of the wheel have been computed and compared. The constant amplitude rotary bending fatigue test of the wheel has been simulated by means of Finite Element method. The FE model has been validated by measuring the strain at several points of the wheel during the actual test. From the FE model, the stress tensor time history on the whole wheel over a loading cycle has been extracted.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1013
Matthieu Duchemin, Vincent Collee
Abstract MCE-5 DEVELOPMENT has been developing its variable compression ratio engine (VCRi) for over a decade aiming at reducing fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. In order to transmit power from the piston (combustion) to the crankshaft, the MCE-5 VCRi technology is based on three innovative components: a gear wheel and two racks. This gear mechanism ensures a very low friction compared to other continuous VCR solutions based on bearings. However, this transmission is used in nonstandard conditions: the direction of rotation is reversed repeatedly, and the parts are submitted to high and rapidly varying loads. To avoid interferences and alteration caused by high contact pressure at high load, and ensure a regular transmission at low load, the profile of the teeth is carefully considered. A crowning shape is placed on the teeth in the direction of the gear axis, and a correction is applied to the tooth active profiles in the area of tooth roots and tooth tips.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1315
Yongchang Du, Yingping Lv, Yujian Wang, Pu Gao
Abstract Closed-loop coupling model, based on complex eigenvalue analysis, is one of the most popular and effective methods for brake squeal analysis. In the model, imaginary coupling springs are used to represent the normal contacting force between coupled nodes. Unfortunately, the physical meaning of these coupling springs was seldom discussed and there’s no systematic method to determine the value of spring stiffness. Realizing this problem, this paper, based on finite element model and modal synthesis technique, develops a new closed-loop coupling disc brake squeal model without introducing imaginary coupling springs. Different from the traditional model where two nodes at coupling interface are connected through a spring, these node-pairs in the new model are assumed to remain in tight contact during vibration. Details of the model, including force analysis, coordinate reduction and transformation and complex eigenvalue decomposition are given in this paper.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1327
Zhenfeng Wang, Mingming Dong, Junfeng Xiang, Pu Gao, Liang Gu, Yushuai Wang
Abstract The study of mechanical properties special in the characteristics of elastic element is a challenging task for vehicle industry. Since torsion bar spring acts as an important part of elastic element, and improves performance of torsion bar spring is of great concern. The effects of the torsion bar spring pre-setting precision on the presetting performance are presented. Based on elastic-plastic theories, the algebraic model of torsion bar spring is established to analyze the stress, torque and residual stress under the yield and plastic conditions in pre-setting process. Then, the stress and strain states of various torsion bar springs in different conditions are simulated using the validated finite element model in ABAQUS software. The simulation results show the effects of torsion error on the pre-setting performance are less than 5% in the pre-setting process.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1344
Koushi Kumagai, Masaaki Kuwahara, Tsuyoshi Yasuki, Norimasa Koreishi
Abstract This paper describes the development of a fracture finite element (FE) model for laser screw welding (LSW) and validation of the model with experimental results. LSW was developed and introduced to production vehicles by Toyota Motor Corporation in 2013. LSW offers superb advantages such as increased productivity and short pitch welding. Although the authors had previously developed fracture FE models for conventional resistance spot welding (RSW), a fracture model for LSW has not been developed. To develop this fracture model, many comprehensive experiments were conducted. The results revealed that LSW had twice as many variations in fracture modes compared to RSW. Moreover, fracture mode bifurcations were also found to result from differences in clearance between welded plates. In order to analyze LSW fracture phenomena, detailed FE models using fine hexahedral elements were developed.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1358
Jerry Lai, Youssef Ziada, Juhchin Yang
Abstract During the planetary gear assembly, staking is a widely-used method for affixing pinion shafts onto the position. A reliable staking process not only prevents the movement of shaft during transmission operation, but also minimizes the distortion of the assembly due to the staking process. The quality of staking operations is determined by the component designs, the process parameters, and the staking tool geometry. It would be extremely time-consuming and tedious to evaluate these factors empirically; not even mention the requirement of prototypes in the early stage of a new program. A Finite Element methodology is developed to simulate the complete staking process including shaft press in, staking, and after staking tool release. The critical process parameters, such as staking force, staking length, shaft and holes interference amount, etc., are then evaluated systematically.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1355
Jeffrey R. Hodgkins, Walter Brophy, Thomas Gaydosh, Norimasa Kobayashi, Hiroo Yamaoka
Abstract Current vehicle acoustic performance prediction methods, CAE (computer aided engineering) or physical testing, have some difficulty predicting interior sound in the mid-frequency range (300 to 1000 Hz). It is in this frequency range where the overall acoustic performance becomes sensitive to not only the contributions of structure-borne sources, which can be studied using traditional finite element analysis (FEA) methods, but also the contribution of airborne noise sources which increase proportional to frequency. It is in this higher frequency range (>1000 Hz) that physical testing and statistical CAE methods are traditionally used for performance studies. This paper will discuss a study that was undertaken to test the capability of a finite element modeling method that can accurately simulate air-borne noise phenomena in the mid-frequency range.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1352
Venkata Suresh Yaparala, B. S. Guru Prasad, Harsha Mottedoddi Puttaswamy
Abstract Residual stresses and thermal distortion are a common phenomenon observed in any welding method. This is a result of non-uniform stresses generated due to highly localized heating at the joint edges, which fuses the base material and leads to considerable amount of changes in mechanical properties. Thus, it is very important to evaluate these effects in any welded structural members before designing for actual loading condition. Therefore, accurate prediction of these stresses and distortion is of critical importance to ensure the in-service structural integrity of welded structures. The recent advancement in Computational simulation and numerical techniques helps in evaluating the weld distortion and residual stresses. The moving heat flux approach and Element birth/death method makes it easier to analyze the weld distortion. This is done with the use of ANSYS® Commercial FE software.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1492
Ming Shen, Haojie Mao, Binhui Jiang, Feng Zhu, Xin Jin, Liqiang Dong, Suk Jae Ham, Palani Palaniappan, Clifford Chou, King Yang
Abstract To help predict the injury responses of child pedestrians and occupants in traffic incidents, finite element (FE) modeling has become a common research tool. Until now, there was no whole-body FE model for 10-year-old (10 YO) children. This paper introduces the development of two 10 YO whole-body pediatric FE models (named CHARM-10) with a standing posture to represent a pedestrian and a seated posture to represent an occupant with sufficient anatomic details. The geometric data was obtained from medical images and the key dimensions were compared to literature data. Component-level sub-models were built and validated against experimental results of post mortem human subjects (PMHS). Most of these studies have been mostly published previously and briefly summarized in this paper. For the current study, focus was put on the late stage model development.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0290
Kyoo Sil Choi, Erin Barker, Guang Cheng, Xin Sun, Joy Forsmark, Mei Li
Abstract In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) microstructure-based finite element modeling method (i.e., extrinsic modeling method) is developed, which can be used in examining the effects of porosity on the ductility/fracture of Mg castings. For this purpose, AM60 Mg tensile samples were generated under high-pressure die-casting in a specially-designed mold. Before the tensile test, the samples were CT-scanned to obtain the pore distributions within the samples. 3D microstructure-based finite element models were then developed based on the obtained actual pore distributions of the gauge area. The input properties for the matrix material were determined by fitting the simulation result to the experimental result of a selected sample, and then used for all the other samples’ simulation. The results show that the ductility and fracture locations predicted from simulations agree well with the experimental results.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0286
Changsheng Wang, Haijiang Liu, Tao Zhang, Zhiyong Zhu, Liang Liu
Abstract With the increasing development in automotive industry, finite element (FE) analysis with model bias prediction has been used more and more widely in the fields of chassis design, body weight reduction optimization and some components development, which reduced the development cycles and enhanced analysis accuracy significantly. However, in the simulation process of plastic fuel tank system, there is few study of model validation or verification, which results that non-risky design decisions cannot be enhanced due to too much consuming time. In this study, to correct the discrepancy and uncertainty of the simulated finite element model, Bayesian inference-based method is employed, to quantify model uncertainty and evaluate the simulated results based on collected data from real mechanical tests of plastic fuel tanks and FE simulations under the same boundary conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0504
Shin-Jang Sung, Jwo Pan
Abstract Analytical stress intensity factor solutions for welds in lap-shear specimens of equal thickness under pinned and clamped loading conditions based on the beam bending theory are presented and examined. Finite element analyses are also employed to obtain the stress intensity factor solutions for welds in lap-shear specimens under both clamped and pinned loading conditions. The computational solutions are compared well with the analytical solutions. The results of the analytical and computational solutions indicate that the bending moments at the clamped edges reduce the mode I and II stress intensity factor solutions by about 7% to 10% for the given specimen geometry. The effects of the clamped grips depend on the ratio of the weld width to the specimen length. Comparisons of the stress intensity factor solutions suggest that the fatigue lives of the welds in lap-shear specimens under clamped loading conditions should be higher than those under pinned loading conditions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0502
Yuyang Song, Umesh Gandhi
Abstract The application of adhesively bonded joints has increased significantly in order to improve the integrity of structural components in vehicle design. In this paper, finite element analysis is used to model the adhesive behavior of the adhesive joining between steel and composite. The cohesive element modeling techniques in Abaqus is used to model the adhesive interface. The standard lap shear and peeling test are first conducted to estimate the adhesive properties using reverse engineering. Next, these adhesive properties are applied and validated on the FE model of a 3D part for complex loading condition. The FEA model using reverse engineered cohesive interface properties get closed match to the test results for joining of the complex shape parts.
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