Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 3008
2015-05-11 ...
  • May 11-22, 2015 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
  • October 19-30, 2015 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used by engineers as a design tool in new product development since the early 1990's. Until recently, most FEA applications have been limited to static analysis due to the cost and complexity of advanced types of analyses. Progress in the commercial FEA software and in computing hardware has now made it practical to use advanced types as an everyday design tool of design engineers. In addition, competitive pressures and quality requirements demand a more in-depth understanding of product behavior under real life loading conditions.
2015-03-16 ...
  • March 16-27, 2015 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
  • September 14-25, 2015 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
The Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been widely implemented by automotive companies and is used by design engineers as a tool during the product development process. Design engineers analyze their own designs while they are still in the form of easily modifiable CAD models to allow for quick turnaround times and to ensure prompt implementation of analysis results in the design process.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0219
Sahil Kakria, IVN SriHarsha, Milind Wagh
Suspension and chassis play a vital role in the structural performance of an off-road vehicle. The paper focuses on Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) modeling and simulation study of an All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) structure to analyze its static and dynamic behavior. An integrated MBD-FEA approach used for analysis purpose has been presented. In the study, a Multi Body Dynamic (MBD) model of the ATV suspension system is built using ADAMS/Car. The effect of change in suspension hardpoints on suspension characteristics has been analyzed by carrying out Design of Experiment (DOE) study using ADAMS/Insight. This is done to minimize roll, camber and kingpin angle variation during vertical wheel travel, thus increasing stability of the vehicle under rough road conditions. This helps in optimizing the front and rear suspension geometry of ATV. The Finite Element (FE) model of ATV chassis is prepared to check its structural integrity.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0186
Mohitkumar R. Chauhan, Girish Kotwal, Abhijeet Majge
Numerical Simulation of Tire and Wheel Assembly Impact Test using Finite Element Method M R Chauhan1 Prof. G N Kotwal2 A S Majage3 1,2Department of Mechanical Engineering, VIT, Pune, India 3Finite Four Technologies, Pune, India Abstract: The major concern in design of wheel is their potentiality to bear impact loads. Therefore, wheel impact test is required to fulfill the safety requirement. In this study, there are two objectives; first, the simulation of impact test for wheel is developed according to SAE wheel impact test. Often when vehicle interacts with guardrails, bridge rails and curbs the interaction between roadside hardware and wheel causes wheel damage. The test setup consists of vertically acting striker of mass 480 kg and having prescribed velocity. Energy based approach and total plastic work concept of ductile fracture mechanics is used to predict wheel impact failure.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0150
Sanjay Chaudhuri, Vikram Saini
Special purpose, high payload carrying capacity, live gooseneck, multi axles, hydraulic suspension semi trailer is ab-initio designed for transportation and tilting of heavy cargo from horizontal to vertical by hydraulically actuated mechanism integrated on the trailer. The chassis is levelled on hydraulic jacks followed by tilting of cargo. Hence the chassis experiences variable forces during tilting and estimated from kinematic model of tilting mechanism. These forces are input for finite element based structural design of chassis. Structural deflection of a step is made as initial condition for certain load cases of the analysis. Live gooseneck of this semi-trailer consists of hydraulically actuated mechanism, interconnected with multiple hydraulic suspensions in appropriate ratios. Estimation of Axles and fifth wheel force distributions of such trailer is complex. Mathematical modelling made to estimate these forces and applied as inputs for finite element analysis.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0212
Neerav Karani, Aditya Malladi, Sridhar lingan Sr
Abstract In the current competitive automobile market, with growing knowledge and concern for occupant and vulnerable road user safety, design & engineering of passenger cars in stipulated time is a challenge. As front styling is a crucial factor, early involvement of Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) through front loading helps reduce the product development time considerably with a pedestrian friendly engineered design. The present paper explains how initial inputs are given to styling & engineering teams during early stages of product development where availability of Computer Aided Design (CAD) data is minimal. Critical load paths were identified and shape of the front end was modified accordingly. Various locations of hinge mechanism were evaluated to reduce the severity of injury in the head impact zone. Sufficient gaps between the exterior surfaces and interior hard points were worked upon to reduce the impact values.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0215
T Sukumar, Murugan Subramanian, Sathish Kumar Subramaniyan, Nandakumar Subramanian
Abstract Reliable sealing solutions are extremely important in commercial vehicle industry because sealing failures can cause vehicle breakdown, damage of equipment or even accident, incurring expenses that are substantially higher than the costs of just replacing the damaged seals. Consequently, new seal designs must be experimentally verified and validated before they can be implemented. In this study, Mooney - Rivlin hyper elastic material model is used to simulate the sealing behavior during dynamic conditions. The seal under study is a large diameter lip seal made of Neoprene® rubber (NBR) A finite element model to study the response of the seal under dynamic conditions was developed. The analysis took into account the mating parts dimensions and the lip seal parameters. Three designs were proposed and verified. The seal design is optimized using non-linear FEA and validated. Results include contact pressure, deflection and strain experienced by the seal during actuation.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0123
Yogesh Surkutwar, Mahesh Anand Patwardhan, Nagesh Voderahobli Karanth, Atul Gaikwad
Abstract The work presented in this paper deals with the use of combined Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) and experimental testing approach for reducing engine noise. The paper describes a systematic approach for giving solutions to the structure borne engine noise related problems. Noise Source Identification (NSI) was carried out on diesel engine to identify noise radiating sources, ranking of noise sources was carried out and contribution of individual engine component in radiated Sound Power Level (SWL) was computed. Detailed Finite Element Model (FEM) of engine assembly was developed and model was correlated in terms of natural frequencies and transfer functions by performing modal testing. Correlated FEM was used for predicting surface vibration velocities under various engine speeds and loading conditions in frequency domain. Velocities so predicted in frequency domain were used as an input for SWL prediction using Boundary Element Method (BEM) approach.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0023
Daniele Barbani, Niccolò Baldanzini, Marco Pierini
Abstract In the study of new solutions for motorcycle passive safety, FE models of full-scale crash tests play a strategic role. The most important issue in the development process of FE models is their reliability to reproduce real crash tests. To help the engineering in the validation phase, a sensitivity analysis of a FE model for motorcycle-car crash tests is carried-out. The aim of this study is to investigate the model response subjected to variations of specific input parameters. The DOE is performed generating a list of simulations (each one composed by a unique combination of 8 parameters) through Latin Hypercube Sampling. The outputs monitored are the Head Injury Criterion (HIC) and Neck Injury Criteria (Nij). The analysis of the results is performed using scatter plots and linear regression curves to identify the parameters that have major impact on the outputs and to assess the type of dependency (linear or non-linear).
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0119
Diego Copiello, Ze Zhou, Gregory Lielens
Abstract This paper addresses the numerical simulation of motorcycle exhaust system noise using a transfer matrix method (TMM) supporting high order analytical acoustic modes representation combined with finite element method (FEM) included in the Actran software, R15. In the state-of-the-art of hybrid TMM/FEM approach the main assumption consists in a 1D plane wave acoustic propagation in the components connections which is intrinsically limiting the maximum frequency of the analysis. In motorcycle exhaust systems this limitation is even stronger because typical geometries exhibit strong curvatures and bends causing the scattering of the acoustic wave into higher order modes. Therefore, results might be erroneous even at frequencies at which only the plane wave is expected to be propagating. The improved transfer matrix method presented in this paper overcomes this limitation allowing to increase the range of applicability of this method.
2014-09-28
Journal Article
2014-01-2492
Sukumar T, Murugan Subramanian
Abstract This paper presents a systematic procedure for design and evaluation of snap fit for Quadruple System Protection Valve (QSPV) piston assembly. The QSPV piston is assembled with housing by means of snap joint. Snap joints are a very simple, economical and rapid way of joining two different components. All types of snap joints have in common the principle that a protruding part of one component, e.g., a hook, stud or bead is deflected briefly during the joining operation and catches in a depression (undercut) in the mating component. After the joining operation, the snap-fit features should return to a stress-free condition. The joint may be separable or inseparable depending on the shape of the undercut; the force required to separate the components varies greatly according to the design. It is particularly important to bear the following factors in mind when designing snap joints: Mechanical load during the assembly operation and force required for assembly.
2014-09-28
Technical Paper
2014-01-2516
Katsuhiro Uchiyama, Yuji Shishido
Abstract Last year, we presented the “spring - mass model” FEA simulation from stick-slip phenomenon standpoint for improvement of “creep groan”. “Creep groan” is one of representative groan of brake system for automobile and it is clarified by µ vs velocity (µ−V) property of friction material. This time, we will present our study for reduction of creep groan by pad shape parameter (chamfer and slot) with “advanced” spring - mass model” FEA simulation which used actual pad shape as mass model. In addition, this paper was revised based on oral presentation which we presented at SAE 2013.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2067
Michael Klanner, Mathias Mair, Franz Diwoky, Oszkar Biro, Katrin Ellermann
Abstract The noise vibration and harshness (NVH) simulation of electric machines becomes increasingly important due to the use of electric machines in vehicles. This paper describes a method to reduce the calculation time and required memory of the finite element NVH simulation of electrical machines. The stator of a synchronous electrical machine is modeled as a two-dimensional problem to reduce investigation effort. The electromagnetic forces acting on the stator are determined by FE-simulation in advance. Since these forces need to be transferred from the electromagnetic model to the structural model, a coupling algorithm is necessary. In order to reduce the number of nodes, which are involved in the coupling between the electromagnetic and structural model, multipoint constraints (MPC) are used to connect several coupling nodes to one new coupling node. For the definition of the new coupling nodes, the acting load is analyzed with a 2D-FFT.
2014-06-30
Journal Article
2014-01-2081
Rainer Stelzer, Theophane Courtois, Ki-Sang Chae, Daewon SEO, Seok-Gil Hong
Abstract The assessment of the Transmission Loss (TL) of vehicle components at Low-Mid Frequencies generally raises difficulties associated to the physical mechanisms of the noise transmission through the automotive panel. As far as testing is concerned, it is common in the automotive industry to perform double room TL measurements of component baffled cut-outs, while numerical methods are rather applied when prototype or hardware variants are not available. Indeed, in the context of recent efforts for reduction of vehicle prototypes, the use of simulation is constantly challenged to deliver reliable means of decision during virtual design phase. While the Transfer matrix method is commonly and conveniently used at Mid-High frequencies for the calculation of a trimmed panel, the simulation of energy transfer at low frequencies must take into account modal interactions between the vehicle component and the acoustic environment.
2014-06-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2083
Arnaud Caillet, Antoine Guellec, Denis Blanchet, Thomas Roy
Abstract Since the last decade, the automotive industry has expressed the need to better understand how the different trim parts interact together in a complete car up to 400 Hz for structureborne excitations. Classical FE methods in which the acoustic trim is represented as non-structural masses (NSM) and high damping or surface absorbers on the acoustic cavity can only be used at lower frequencies and do not provide insights into the interactions of the acoustic trims with the structure and the acoustic volume. It was demonstrated in several papers that modelling the acoustic components using the poroelastic finite element method (PEM) can yield accurate vibro-acoustic response such as transmission loss of a car component [1,2,3]. The increase of performance of today's computers and the further optimization of commercial simulation codes allow computations on full vehicle level [4,5,6] with adequate accuracy and computation times, which is essential for a car OEM.
2014-04-28
Technical Paper
2014-28-0035
Shiva Kumar Manoharan, Christoph Friedrich
Abstract Self-loosening of bolted connections is a crucial failure mode for joints under transverse dynamic load. For some years, three dimensional finite element analysis has been enabled for avoiding experimental investigations of self-loosening. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the effect of joint design on the self-loosening of bolted connections, which is important for product development in early design stage. Joints consisting of internally threaded nut components are often heavier and stiffer as compared with light weight designs consisting of a separate nut. The difference of self-loosening is significant between arrangements with nut thread component and separate nut, although the design versions only contain slight modifications. Hence it is necessary to evaluate the effect of light weight design on self-loosening.
2014-04-28
Technical Paper
2014-28-0039
Christiane Fourment, Julien Barlier, Mickael Barbelet, Patrice Lasne, David Cardinaux
Abstract Virtual forming tools based on Finite Element simulation are routinely used in order to improve process design and to reduce time to market. However, with the growing requirements with regards to in-use properties of forged components, not only the forming processes must be simulated but the entire process chain, including the heat treatment processes that are carried out to improve the mechanical properties of the final part. In order to meet these needs, new heat treatment features have been introduced into the commercial code FORGE®. This paper presents an application of induction hardening to an industrial component. This application demonstrates the strategic capabilities of FORGE® commercial software to achieve production challenges.
Anytime
Training / Education On Demand Web Seminar RePlay
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used by engineers as a design tool in new product development since the early 1990's. Until recently, most FEA applications have been limited to static analysis due to the cost and complexity of advanced types of analyses. Progress in the commercial FEA software and in computing hardware has now made it practical to use advanced types as an everyday design tool of design engineers. In addition, competitive pressures and quality requirements demand a more in-depth understanding of product behavior under real life loading conditions.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-1028
Venkat Pisipati, Srikanth Krishnaraj, Edgar Quinto Campos
Abstract Motor vehicle safety standards are getting to be more demanding with time. For automotive interiors, instrument panel (IP) head impact protection is a key requirement of the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 201. To ensure compliance of this requirement, head impact tests are conducted at 12 and 15 mph for performance verification. Computer simulation has become more prevalent as the primary development tool due to the significant reduction in time and cost that it offers. LS-DYNA is one of the most commonly used non-linear solvers in the automotive industry, particularly for safety related simulations such as the head impact of automotive interiors. LS-DYNA offers a wide variety of material models, and material type 024 (MAT 024, piecewise linear plasticity) is one of the most popular ones [1]. Although it was initially developed for metals, it is commonly used for polymers as well.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0890
Shuming Chen, Dengzhi Peng, Dengfeng Wang
Abstract Automobile cabin acoustical comfort is one of the main features that may attract customers to purchase a new car. The acoustic cavity mode of the car has an effect on the acoustical comfort. To identify the factors affecting computing accuracy of the acoustic mode, three different element type and six different element size acoustic finite element models of an automobile passenger compartment are developed and experimentally assessed. The three different element type models are meshed in three different ways, tetrahedral elements, hexahedral elements and node coupling tetrahedral and hexahedral elements (tetra-hexahedral elements). The six different element size models are meshed with hexahedral element varies from 50mm to 75mm. Modal analysis test of the passenger car is conducted using loudspeaker excitation to identify the compartment cavity modes.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0731
Zhenfei Zhan, Yan Fu, Ren-Jye Yang
In vehicle design, response surface model (RSM) is commonly used as a surrogate of the high fidelity Finite Element (FE) model to reduce the computational time and improve the efficiency of design process. However, RSM introduces additional sources of uncertainty, such as model bias, which largely affect the reliability and robustness of the prediction results. The bias of RSM need to be addressed before the model is ready for extrapolation and design optimization. This paper further investigates the Bayesian inference based model extrapolation method which is previously proposed by the authors, and provides a systematic and integrated stochastic bias corrected model extrapolation and robustness design process under uncertainty. A real world vehicle design example is used to demonstrate the validity of the proposed method.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0743
Bo Liu, Zhenfei Zhan, Xuemei Zhao, Haibo Chen, Bo Lu, Yusheng Li, Jian Li
Abstract Vehicle weight reduction has become one of the essential research areas in the automotive industry. It is important to perform design optimization of Body-in-White (BIW) at the concept design phase so that to reduce the development cost and shorten the time-to-market in later stages. Finite Element (FE) models are commonly used for vehicle design. However, even with increasing speed of computers, the simulation of FE models is still too time-consuming due to the increased complexity of models. This calls for the development of a systematic and efficient approach that can effectively perform vehicle weight reduction, while satisfying the stringent safety regulations and constraints of development time and cost. In this paper, an efficient BIW weight reduction approach is proposed with consideration of complex safety and stiffness performances. A parametric BIW FE model is first constructed, followed by the building of surrogate models for the responses of interest.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0355
Atishay Jain
Abstract One of the key aspects of designing a race car chassis is Torsion Stiffness (Roll stiffness). Designers strive to develop a chassis design with a high value of roll stiffness to counter the forces applied by the suspension during cornering while keeping the weight as low as possible. CAD and static analysis techniques are instrumental for virtual testing and validation in the initial stages of a project prior to experimental testing. This paper intends to encapsulate elementary analysis skills and their application in designing and developing tubular frame structures for amateur racing vehicles and simultaneously focusing on reducing the time for the design and development process.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-0486
Raed E. El-jawahri, Tony R. Laituri, Agnes S. Kim, Stephen W. Rouhana, Para V. Weerappuli
In the present study, transfer equations relating the responses of post-mortem human subjects (PMHS) to the mid-sized male Hybrid III test dummy (HIII50) under matched, or nearly-identical, loading conditions were developed via math modeling. Specifically, validated finite element (FE) models of the Ford Human Body Model (FHBM) and the HIII50 were used to generate sets of matched cases (i.e., 256 frontal impact cases involving different impact speeds, severities, and PMHS age). Regression analyses were subsequently performed on the resulting age-dependent FHBM- and HIII50-based responses. This approach was conducted for five different body regions: head, neck, chest, femur, and tibia. All of the resulting regression equations, correlation coefficients, and response ratios (PHMS relative to HIII50) were consistent with the limited available test-based results.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0515
Tushar Baviskar, Jagadish Mahadevaiah, Vijay Shankar Iyer, Mark Neal
Abstract EEVC WG17 Upper Leg impactors have been used to assess the risk of pedestrian upper leg injuries with respect to regulatory and consumer metric rating requirements. The paper compares the femur injury responses between the finite element models of the EEVC WG17 Upper Leg impactor, the FlexPLI and the 50th percentile male GM/UVa pedestrian model on two sample vehicle architectures, for a sedan and a sports utility vehicle. The study shows that the peak femur load and maximum bending moment response are higher in the EEVC WG17 Upper Leg impactor than the FlexPLI and the human body model. Variation studies are carried out to study the influence of impact location on the vehicle, impactor knee height, additional upper body mass and human body model size on the femur injury responses.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0522
Chinmoy Pal, Tomosaburo Okabe, Kulothungan Vimalathithan, Jeyabharath Manoharan, Muthukumar Muthanandam, Satheesh Narayanan
Abstract A logistic regression analysis of accident cases in the NASS-PCDS (National Automotive Sampling System-Pedestrian Crash Data Study) database clearly shows that pedestrian pelvis injuries tend to be complex and depend on various factors such as the impact speed, the ratio of the pedestrian height to that of the bonnet leading edge (BLE) of the striking vehicle, and the gender and age of the pedestrian. Adult female models (50th %ile female AF50: 161 cm and 61 kg; 5th %ile female AF05: 154 cm and 50 kg) were developed by morphing the JAMA 50th %ile male AM50 and substituting the pelvis of the GHBMC AM50 model. The fine-meshed pelvis model thus obtained is capable of predicting pelvis fractures. Simulations conducted with these models indicate that the characteristics of pelvis injury patterns in male and female pedestrians are influenced by the hip/BLE height ratio and to some extent by the pelvis bone shape.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0532
Simon B. Albrodt, Fadi Tahan, Kennerly Digges
Abstract Different roof strength methods are applied on the 2003 Ford Explorer finite element (FE) model to achieve the current Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 216 requirements. Two different modification approaches are utilized. Additionally, the best design of each approach is tested dynamically, in rollover and side impact simulations. In the first approach, several roll cage designs are integrated in all pillars, roof cross-members, and in the side roof rails. A roll cage design with a strength-to-weight ratio (SWR) of 3.58 and 3.40 for driver and passenger sides, respectively, with a weight penalty of 18.54 kg is selected for dynamic test assessments. The second approach investigates different localized reinforcements to achieve a more reasonable weight penalty. A localized reinforcement of the B-pillar alone with a tube meets the new FMVSS 216 requirements with a weight penalty of 4.52 kg and is selected for dynamic analyses.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1175
Michael Tess, Jaal Ghandhi
The effects of imaging system resolution and laser sheet thickness on the measurement of the Batchelor scale were investigated in a single-cylinder optical engine. The Batchelor scale was determined by fitting a model spectrum to the dissipation spectrum that was obtained from fuel tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) images of the in-cylinder scalar field. The imaging system resolution was quantified by measuring the step-response function; the scanning knife edge technique was used to measure the 10-90% clip width of the laser sheet. In these experiments, the spatial resolution varied from a native resolution of 32.0 μm to 137.4 μm, and the laser sheet thickness ranged from 108 μm to 707 μm. Thus, the overall resolution of the imaging system was made to vary by approximately a factor of four in the in-plane dimension and a factor of six in the out-of-plane dimension.
2014-04-01
Journal Article
2014-01-1711
Liu Zhien, Xiaomin Wang, Zhang Yan, Xueni Li, Yu Xu
In order to predict the thermal fatigue life of the internal combustion engine exhaust manifold effectively, it was necessary to accurately obtain the unsteady heat transfer process between hot streams and exhaust manifold all the time. This paper began with the establishment of unsteady coupled heat transfer model by using serial coupling method of CFD and FEA numerical simulations, then the bidirectional thermal coupling analysis between fluid and structure was realized, as a result, the difficulty that the transient thermal boundary conditions were applied to the solid boundary was solved. What's more, the specific coupling mode, the physical quantities delivery method on the coupling interface and the surface mesh match were studied. On this basis, the differences between strong coupling method and portioned treatment for solving steady thermal stress numerical analysis were compared, and a more convenient and rapid method for solving static thermal stress was found.
2014-04-01
Technical Paper
2014-01-0531
Madhav Khadilkar
Abstract The purpose of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 216 is to reduce fatalities and serious injuries when vehicle roof crushes into occupant compartment during rollover crash. Upgraded roof crush resistance standard (571.216a Standard No. 216a) requires vehicle to achieve maximum applied force of 3.0 times unloaded vehicle weight (UVW) on both driver and passenger sides of the roof. (For vehicles with gross vehicle weight rating ≤ 6,000 lb.) This paper provides an overview of current approach for dual side roof strength Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and its limitations. It also proposes a new approach based on powerful features available in virtual tools. In the current approach, passenger side loading follows driver side loading and requires two separate analyses before arriving at final assessment. In the proposed approach only one analysis suffices as driver and passenger side loadings are combined in a single analysis.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3008

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: