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Training / Education
2015-06-08
The advent of digital computers and the availability of ever cheaper and faster micro processors have brought a tremendous amount of control system applications to the automotive industry in the last two decades. From engine and transmission systems, to virtually all chassis subsystems (brakes, suspensions, and steering), some level of computer control is present. Control systems theory is also being applied to comfort systems such as climate control and safety systems such as cruise control or collision mitigation systems. This seminar begins by introducing the highly mathematical field of control systems focusing on what the classical control system tools do and how they can be applied to automotive systems.
Event
2014-12-11
With the integration of many subsystems, modeling, simulation and systems engineering take on a more important role in the design/development of new vehicle technology
Event
2014-12-11
Power electronics, especially advanced technologies such as GaN, GAAs, and SiC, offer great advantages in increasing the overall system efficiency of xEV systems. This session will explore various technologies and the benefits/challenges facing them.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Mario Farrugia, Andrew Briffa, Michael Farrugia
Abstract A conversion to LPG of a SI engine that was originally carbureted gasoline is reported in this work. The conversion was implemented on a 1988 Skoda 120L with a 1174cc rear engine. The conversion to run on Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) was carried out using a programmable Engine Control Unit (ECU) that operated a single point fuel injection system. The LPG used was a commercially available mixture of butane and propane. The fuel injection system was designed to operate with the LPG in the liquid state. A circulating pump was used to maintain availability of LPG in liquid state at the inlet to the fuel injector. This made possible the use of similar fuel injection parts as in a gasoline system. Injection of the fuel in the liquid state provided cooling to the intake air as measured during driving of the vehicle and also on chassis dynamometer runs. Engine power output measured on the chassis dynamometer showed equal power between gasoline and LPG around mid RPM of 2500 RPM with a slight decline (4%) in power of the LPG system at 5000 RPM.
Event
2014-10-09
Early exhaust valve opening (EEVO) is a strategy to increase turbine out temperatures (TOT) for exhaust aftertreatment thermal management; however, it also results in an increase in the required fueling to maintain a particular brake torque. This study outlines experimental results of the impact of EEVO on exhaust temperature (measured at the turbine outlet) and required fueling. Several EEVO sweeps were performed on a diesel engine using a fully-flexible variable valve actuation (VVA) system. Experimental data was taken at three speed/load conditions with varied fuel injection and air handling parameters. EEVO was studied for nominal exhaust valve opening (EVO) timing to 90 crank angles early. The results show that TOT is observed to increase by 30C to 80C. However, brake thermal efficiency (BTE) reductions observed are between 10-20% from the BTE at nominal valve timing. It is shown that while EEVO negatively affects the power output during the expansion stroke, at a constant brake torque (with additional fueling), EEVO has no significant effect on the gross indicated power.
Event
2014-10-09
Cylinder deactivation (CDA) at idle conditions results in a reduction in air-to-fuel ratio, and heat transfer surface area. This enables an increase in exhaust temperature for aftertreatment thermal management, and an increase in efficiency via reduced pumping and heat transfer losses. This study focuses on the impact of 3-cylinder CDA on exhaust temperature and efficiency at both loaded and unloaded idle conditions. At the loaded condition, deactivating 3 cylinders provides an increase in exhaust temperature from about 200C (6-cylinders) to approximately 300C (3-cylinders), with no fuel economy penalty. Additionally, at the unloaded condition, CDA provides an increase in exhaust temperature of about 20C, from about 117C to about 135C, with a fuel consumption reduction of 15%-26%.
Event
2014-10-09
This session covers advanced technologies and analysis/design/testing techniques related to powertrain performance, emissions, and electronic controls. It includes both system-level and component-level contents such as engine system design and integration optimization. Typical topics include emissions, fuel economy, combustion, air charging, EGR systems, fuel systems, valvetrains, engine brakes, waste heat recovery, calibration, steady-state and transient performance, engine/powertrain/drivetrain controls, model-based controls, sensors, OBD, and HIL. The topics of engine applications cover on-road, off-road, heavy-duty, and light-duty.
Event
2014-10-09
This session covers advanced technologies and analysis/design/testing techniques related to powertrain performance, emissions, and electronic controls. It includes both system-level and component-level contents such as engine system design and integration optimization. Typical topics include emissions, fuel economy, combustion, air charging, EGR systems, fuel systems, valvetrains, engine brakes, waste heat recovery, calibration, steady-state and transient performance, engine/powertrain/drivetrain controls, model-based controls, sensors, OBD, and HIL. The topics of engine applications cover on-road, off-road, heavy-duty, and light-duty.
Event
2014-10-09
This session covers advanced technologies and analysis/design/testing techniques related to powertrain performance, emissions, and electronic controls. It includes both system-level and component-level contents such as engine system design and integration optimization. Typical topics include emissions, fuel economy, combustion, air charging, EGR systems, fuel systems, valvetrains, engine brakes, waste heat recovery, calibration, steady-state and transient performance, engine/powertrain/drivetrain controls, model-based controls, sensors, OBD, and HIL. The topics of engine applications cover on-road, off-road, heavy-duty, and light-duty.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Antoine Delorme, Jason L. Robert, William Eli Hollowell, Andre M. Strobel, Jason T. Krajewski
Abstract In the recent years, Automated Manual Transmissions have become more popular for class 8 heavy trucks. Besides the benefits of smoother gear changes and reduced driver fatigue, AMTs can also greatly reduce fuel consumption by using optimized shifting strategies and advanced controls. The Detroit DT12 AMT demonstrated its ability to save fuel over a standard AMT, due in part to its eCoast feature. eCoast relies on intelligent and advanced electronic controls to safely allow the vehicle to coast on downgrades. While the engine is idling, the drag parasitic energy losses are decreased and the vehicle can fully use its momentum to travel further up and down hill. As one could expect, the type of route profile can greatly affect the fuel savings due to eCoast, since more hilly terrains might offer more opportunities to activate eCoast than flatter roads. In addition, when combined with different vehicle and driving parameters such as vehicle weight and driver desired cruise set speed, the fuel consumption reduction of eCoast is always there, but becomes a more complicated function.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Michael Sprengel, Monika Ivantysynova
Abstract A novel Blended Hydraulic Hybrid transmission architecture is presented in this paper with benefits over conventional designs. This novel configuration combines elements of a hydrostatic transmission, a parallel hybrid, and a selectively connectable high pressure accumulator using passive and actively controlled logic elements. Losses are reduced compared to existing series hybrid transmissions by enabling the units to operate efficiently at pressures below the current high pressure accumulator's pressure. A selective connection to the high pressure accumulator also allows for higher system precharge which increases regenerative braking torque and energy capture with little determent to system efficiency. Finally operating as a hydrostatic transmission increases transmission stiffness (i.e. driver response) and may improve driver feel in certain situations when compared to a conventional series hybrid transmission. To explore the novel blended hybrid architecture six transmissions were modeled and simulated.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Massimiliano Ruggeri, Carlo Ferraresi, Luca Dariz, Giorgio Malaguti
Abstract Functional safety requirements and solutions are more expensive when it comes to lower cost machines with less power but same functionalities with respect to big machines. The paper will show a real Electronic Control Unit (ECU) design of a machine controller, controlling both engine working point, transmission, and other utilities like PTO, 4WD, brakes and Differential Lock; the ECU was designed in accordance to ISO 25119 regulation, to meet AgPL = C or even D for some functionalities. The unit is a fully redundant electronic control unit with two CAN networks and some special safe state oriented mechanism, that allow the Performance Level C with less software analysis requirements compared with traditional solutions. All safety critical sensors are redounded and singularly diagnosable, all command effects are directly observable and most of commands are directly diagnosable. With a minimum extra-cost the hardware category for the most critical controls was brought to the category 4, thus theoretically allowing the Performance Level D achievement.
Technical Paper
2014-09-28
Gunn Hwang, Axel Freiwald, Hyun-Sik Ahn
Abstract Currently major investments by Tier1 and vehicle manufacturers are made to implement and optimize safety critical automotive systems according to the ISO standard 26262 “Road vehicles functional safety”. The ISO 26262 standard describes methods to detect the safety critical faults of a system designed according to the rules of functional safety, but it does not describe how an actual implementation shall look like. Development of ISO 26262 standard compliant systems concentrates on optimizing and improving cost and performance in a competitive environment. More competitive and practical implementations use fewer additional hardware and software resources for safety control and error detection and have higher performance with less overhead. Microcontrollers already have implemented many safety related hardware functions, so called safety mechanisms to mitigate safety critical risks. Depending on how these safety mechanisms are used, functional safety compliant system can get optimized for cost and performance.
Technical Paper
2014-09-28
Chendi Sun, Xiaofei Pei
Abstract This paper presents how hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulations have been used for testing during the development of ABS (Anti-lock Braking System). The Labcar system of ETAS is a popular tool for HIL tests. The vehicle model which is built in Matlab/Simulink is downloaded to run in RTPC (Real-time PC). The Labcar software, Integration Platform (IP), can configure boards which is a link between the model and ABS ECU. In this paper, a classical logic threshold control algorithm is adopted in ABS ECU. Through Labcar Experiment Environment (EE) various parameters can be monitored and modified conveniently. The HIL test of ABS ECU is implemented on high or low - adhesion road respectively. The results show that, although response lag exists in the hydraulic braking system, the curves of velocity and pressure in wheel cylinders can be close to those on real road with proper adjustment of control parameters. So HIL simulations are invaluable, when considering the short development time required in the automotive industry.
Standard
2014-09-25
Adaptive cruise control (ACC) is an enhancement of conventional cruise control systems that allows the ACC-equipped vehicle to follow a forward vehicle at a pre-selected time gap, up to a driver selected speed, by controlling the engine, power train, and/or service brakes. This SAE Standard focuses on specifying the minimum requirements for ACC system operating characteristics and elements of the user interface. This document applies to original equipment and aftermarket ACC systems for passenger vehicles (including motorcycles). This document does not apply to heavy vehicles (GVWR > 10,000 lbs. or 4,536 kg). Furthermore, this document does not address other variations on ACC, such as "stop & go" ACC, that can bring the equipped vehicle to a stop and reaccelerate. Future revisions of this document should consider enhanced versions of ACC, as well as the integration of ACC with Forward Vehicle Collision Warning Systems (FVCWS).
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Arthur V. Radun
Abstract There is a continuing need to simulate power electronic circuits that include magnetic components. It is necessary to determine the interaction of the magnetic component with the rest of the power electronic system so that a dynamic circuit model of the magnetic components including material saturation and iron losses is required. Also, the magnetic component model must be valid when the magnetic component's excitation is not sinusoidal. A dynamic magnetic circuit model derived from Maxwell's equations along with useful theorems for building circuit models from the structure of the magnetic device is reviewed. The developed circuit models are general including magnetic saturation and iron losses. Simulation results for a DC/DC converter employing a conventional gapped inductor and a gapped coupled inductor are presented.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Noriko Morioka, Hidefumi Saito, Norio Takahashi, Manabu Seta, Hitoshi Oyori
Abstract Electrical power management is a key technology in the AEA (All-Electric Aircraft) system, which manages the supply and demand of the electrical power in the entire aircraft system. However, the AEA system requires more than electrical power management alone. Adequate thermal management is also required, because the heat generated by aircraft systems and components increases with progressive system electrification, despite limited heat-sink capability in the aircraft. Since heat dissipation from power electronics such as electric motors, motor controllers and rectifiers, which are widely introduced into the AEA, becomes a key issue, an efficient cooling system architecture should be considered along with the AEA system concept. The more-electric architecture for the aircraft has been developed; mainly targeting reduced fuel burn and CO2 emissions from the aircraft, as well as leveraging ease of maintenance with electric/electronic components. The AEA should pursue more efficient and eco-friendlier systems, which are easier to maintain than those of conventional aircraft/MEA (More-Electric Aircraft), to enhance benefits for passengers and operators.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Niloofar Rashidi Mehrabadi, Bo Wen, Rolando Burgos, Dushan Boroyevich, Chris Roy
Abstract The development of the concepts, terminology and methodology of verification and validation is based on practical issues, not the philosophy of science. Different communities have tried to improve the existing terminology to one which is more comprehensible in their own field of study. All definitions follow the same concept, but they have been defined in a way to be most applicable to a specific field of study. This paper proposes the Verification, Validation, and Uncertainty Quantification (VV&UQ) framework applicable to power electronic systems. Although the steps are similar to the VV&UQ frameworks' steps from other societies, this framework is more efficient as a result of the new arrangement of the steps which makes this procedure more comprehensible. This new arrangement gives this procedure the capability of improving the model in the most efficient way. Since the main goal of the VV&UQ process is to quantitatively assess the confidence in modeling and simulation, the second part of this paper focuses on uncertainty quantification.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Christopher Ian Hill, Chris Gerada, Paolo Giangrande, Serhiy Bozhko
Abstract This paper presents the initial development of a Modelica Library for Electro-Mechanical Actuator system analysis. At present two main system components are described, these are the Power Electronic Converter and Electric Machine, although further components will be added. These models provide the user with the ability to simulate Electric Machine and Power Electronic Converter systems including physical effects, losses and fault conditions. Established modelling programs such as Saber and MATLAB SimPowerSytems are often unable to provide all the aspects required to accurately simulate real systems in an easy to use, flexible manner. Therefore this paper shows how Modelica has been used to create versatile models able to simulate many practical aspects such as Power Electronic Converter losses and Power Electronic Converter faults, Electric Machine losses and Electric Machine faults. Examples are included in order to demonstrate the use of these models within a variety of systems including an Electro-Mechanical Actuator.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Neno Novakovic
Abstract Since the early 1970s, when microprocessors became commercially available, they quickly became a common part of all aircraft control and indication systems. With an ever-increasing number of microprocessor-based airborne applications, safety regulations and software standards like RTCA DO-178 evolved, demanding rigorous requirements and processes for software development, testing, life cycle, and certification. Over the years, as development of aerospace software applications increased, engineering costs of development and product certification costs exponentially increased, having a significant impact on the market. Landing Gear Actuation system is one of many aircraft systems whose control functions are based on microprocessors and software application. Considering that Landing Gear Actuation control algorithm can be defined in a form of the State Machine, this article intends to demonstrate that such controller can be realized as wired logic hardware, without software implementation.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Ralf Cremer, Alfred Engler
Abstract The application of power electronics in aircraft is increasing in the latest aircraft developments. This contribution focuses on the recent advances of activities at Liebherr-Elektronik GmbH linked to power electronics: active power filter based on fast silicon carbide switches, open box design for unpressurized area, light weight housing, EMC management, partial discharge detection and mitigation, arc-fault detection and standardized innovative power cores with optimized sensors. These topics are derived from a roadmap based on beforehand identified key drivers. These key drivers will enable the future More Electric Aircraft (MEA) by focusing on weight, reliability and cost. New technologies as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and advanced integration will support this strategy.
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