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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3106
2016-10-24
Event
Topics cover actuator and sensor mechanisms, devices, and systems; and the impact and control of such actuation and sensing systems on Powertrain thermodynamics, combustion, fuel economy, emissions, and performance.
2016-10-12 ...
  • October 12-13, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Data acquisition is required throughout the product's life cycle - in prototype performance evaluation, reliability/durability testing, duty-cycle analysis, end of line testing, and service and aftermarket product areas. Both lab and on-road testing are needed for components, sub-systems and entire vehicles. As in-vehicle networks become increasingly more sophisticated in terms of the number of controllers, the speed at which they communicate, and the number of parameters available, they are a virtual goldmine for the test engineer.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1836
Sylvestre Lecuru, Pascal Bouvet, Jean-Louis Jouvray, Shanjin Wang
The recent use of electric motors for vehicle propulsion has stimulated the development of numerical methodology to predict their noise and vibration behaviour. These simulations generally use models based on an ideal electric motor. But sometimes acceleration and noise measurements on electric motors show unexpected harmonics that can generate acoustic issues. These harmonics are mainly due to the deviation of the manufactured parts from the nominal dimensions of the ideal machine. The most recent VIBRATEC investigations have shown that the rotor eccentricities have the most relevant impact on acoustics of E-machines. Thus, the measurement of the rotor eccentricity becomes relevant to understand the phenomenon, quantify the deviation and then to use this data as an input in the numerical models.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1844
Jonathan Millitzer, Dirk Mayer, Roman Kraus, Matthias Schmidt
Abstract Current developments in the automotive industry such as downsizing, the use of cylinder deactivation and consistent lightweight construction increasingly enable the application of active control systems for the further reduction of noise and vibration in vehicles. In the past few years, different configurations of actuators and sensors for the realization of an active control system have been investigated and evaluated experimentally. Active engine mounts, inertial mass actuators and structural integrated actuators can be used to reduce either structural vibrations or the interior noise level. As a result, a variety of different topology concepts for the realization of an active control system arises. These can be divided into an active vibration control scenario, the direct influence of the sound field with loudspeakers or the application of structural actuators for the reduction of the interior sound pressure.
2016-04-22
WIP Standard
ARP6904
In order to realize the benefits of Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) within the aerospace and defense industry there is a need to address five critical elements of data interoperability within and across the aircraft maintenance ecosystem, namely • Approach • Trust • Context • Value • Security In Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) data interoperability is the ability of different authorized components, systems, IT, software, applications and organizations to securely communicate, exchange data, interpret data, use the information and derive consistent insight from the data that has been exchanged to derive value.
2016-04-19
WIP Standard
J1843
The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide a common electrical and mechanical interface specification that can be used to design electronic accelerator pedal position sensors and electronic control systems for use in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle applications.
2016-04-14
Event
Topics cover actuator and sensor mechanisms, devices, and systems; and the impact and control of such actuation and sensing systems on Powertrain thermodynamics, combustion, fuel economy, emissions, and performance.
2016-04-14
Event
Topics cover actuator and sensor mechanisms, devices, and systems; and the impact and control of such actuation and sensing systems on Powertrain thermodynamics, combustion, fuel economy, emissions, and performance.
2016-04-12
Event
Modern automotive customers need safer vehicles with little or no impact to the environment. The purpose of this session is to present the latest research and development on novel sensors, actuators, and circuits that are critical to deliver the function of today's complex automotive systems.
2016-04-12
Event
Modern automotive customers need safer vehicles with little or no impact to the environment. The purpose of this session is to present the latest research and development on novel sensors, actuators, and circuits that are critical to deliver the function of today's complex automotive systems.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1566
Liangyao Yu, Xiaoxue Liu, Kefeng Yang, Xiaohui Liu, Shuhao Huo
This paper focuses on reviewing the existing studies of in-tire energy harvesting systems. Energy harvesting systems are widely applied in different areas. But studies in the application of energy harvesters embedded in tires for vehicle control are still rare, most of which focus on solving the problem of power supply of tire pressure sensors. Traditionally the sensors are powered by an embedded battery, which must be changed periodically due to the limited energy storage. Furthermore, the number of in-tire sensors will increase as safety of vehicles has drawn more attention, requiring more in tire electricity supply. So a substitution of the battery, the in-tire energy harvesting system, is worth studying. Currently introduced methods of in-tire energy harvesting principles include piezoelectric, electromagnetic and electrostatic. The source of the energy can be in tire vibration, deformation, rotation and so on.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0215
Amey Y. Karnik, Adrian Fuxman, Phillip Bonkoski, Mrdjan Jankovic, Jaroslav Pekar
Abstract An advanced powertrain cooling system with appropriate control strategy and active actuators allows greater flexibility in managing engine temperatures and operating near constraints. An organized controls development process is necessary to allow comparison of multiple configurations to select the best way forward. In this work, we formulate, calibrate and validate a Model Predictive Controller (MPC) for temperature regulation and constraint handling in an advanced cooling system. A model-based development process was followed; where the system model was used to develop and calibrate a gain scheduled linear MPC. The implementation of MPC for continuous systems and the modification related to implementing switching systems has been described. Multiple hardware configurations were compared with their corresponding control system in simulations.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1191
Saher Al Shakhshir, Torsten Berning
Abstract Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are currently being commercialized for various applications ranging from automotive (e.g. the Toyota Mirai) to stationary such as powering telecom backup units. In PEMFC’s, oxygen from air is internally combined with hydrogen to form water and produce electricity and waste heat. One critical technical problem of these fuel cells is still the water management: the proton exchange membrane in the center of these fuel cells has to be hydrated in order to stay proton-conductive while on the other hand excessive liquid water can lead to cell flooding and increased degradation rates. Clearly, a fundamental understanding of all aspects of water management in PEMFC is imperative. This includes the fuel cell water balance, i.e. which fraction of the product water leaves the fuel cell via the anode channels versus the cathode channel.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1113
Thorsten Arndt, Alex Tarasow, Christian Bohn, Guido Wachsmuth, Roland Serway
Abstract Higher demands on comfort and efficiency require a continuous improvement of the shift process. During the launch and shift process the clutch control is used to get a smooth and efficient behavior. In this short time of acting the shifting behavior can be rated. Many control concepts use a clutch characteristic to calculate the actuator signal based on the clutch torque. Therefore, a high quality of this characteristic is necessary. Because of the dynamic process during clutch engagement the clutch characteristic needs further information to reach a high accuracy for the control algorithm. In this paper an existing clutch torque characteristic is extended to a characteristic map where the clutch torque becomes a function of the current actuator signal of the clutch and the clutch slip. The extension of the torque characteristic describes the slip based dependencies, e.g. the friction coefficient.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1115
Thomas Huth, Stefan Pischinger
Abstract The demand for lower CO2 emissions requires not just the optimization of every single component but the complete system. For a transmission system, it is important to optimize the transmission hardware as we well as the interaction of powertrain components. For automatic transmission with wide ratio spreads, the main losses are caused by the actuation system, which can be reduced with use of ondemand actuation systems. In this paper, a new on-demand electromechanical actuation system with validation results on a clutch test bench is presented. The electro-mechanical actuator shows an increase in the efficiency of 4.1 % compared to the conventional hydraulic actuation in a simulated NEDC (New European Driving Cycle) cycle. This increase is based on the powerless end positions of the actuator (engaged and disengaged clutch). The thermal tension and wear are compensated with a disk spring. This allows a stable control over service life.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1114
Jinsung Kim
Abstract A dry clutch induces judder phenomenon which is caused by variations in the vehicle load condition and frictional material properties. Such a problem may lead to the stick-slip limit cycle that results in undesired longitudinal vibrations of vehicles. To solve this problem, a vibration suppression control is proposed. The amplitude of vibrations is detected by the signal conditioning from the measurements with the transmission input shaft speed and the wheel speed sensors. Based upon this, a perturbation torque is applied additionally on the nominal launch controller to make the drive shaft oscillation vanish. It can be achieved by the control design without any extra hardware cost. Finally, experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0918
Alexander Sappok, Paul Ragaller, Leslie Bromberg, Vitaly Prikhodko, John Storey, James Parks
Abstract Radio frequency (RF)-based sensors provide a direct measure of the particulate filter loading state. In contrast to particulate matter (PM) sensors, which monitor the concentration of PM in the exhaust gas stream for on-board diagnostics purposes, RF sensors have historically been applied to monitor and control the particulate filter regeneration process. This work developed an RF-based particulate filter control system utilizing both conventional and fast response RF sensors, and evaluated the feasibility of applying fast-response RF sensors to provide a real-time measurement of engine-out PM emissions. Testing with a light-duty diesel engine equipped with fast response RF sensors investigated the potential to utilize the particulate filter itself as an engine-out soot sensor.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0894
Kenji Matsumoto, Hironori Harada, Yuki Ono, Yuji Mihara
Abstract A simple method is frequently used to calculate a reciprocating engine’s bearing load from the measured cylinder pressure. However, it has become apparent that engine downsizing and weight reduction cannot be achieved easily if an engine is designed based on the simple method. Because of this, an actual load on a bearing was measured, and the measured load values were compared with a bearing load distribution calculated from cylinder pressure. As a result, it was found that some of actual loads were about half of the calculated ones at certain crank angles. The connecting rod’s elastic deformation was focused on as a factor behind such differences, and the rod’s deformation due to the engine’s explosion load was studied. As a result, it was found that the rod part of the engine’s connecting rod was bent by 0.2 mm and became doglegged. Additional investigation regarding these findings would allow further engine downsizing.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0957
Patrick Schrangl, Roman Schmied, Stephan Stadlbauer, Harald Waschl, Luigi del Re, Bernhard Ramsebner, Christoph Reiter
Abstract Abatement and control of emissions from passenger car combustion engines have been in the focus for a long time. Nevertheless, to address upcoming real-world driving emission targets, knowledge of current engine emissions is crucial. Still, adequate sensors for transient emissions are seldom available in production engines. One way to target this issue is by applying virtual sensors which utilize available sensor information in an engine control unit (ECU) and provide estimates of the not measured emissions. For real-world application it is important that the virtual sensor has low complexity and works under varying conditions. Naturally, the choice of suitable inputs from all available candidates will have a strong impact on these factors. In this work a method to set up virtual sensors by means of design of experiments (DOE) and iterative identification of polynomial models is augmented with a novel input candidate selection strategy.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0943
Paul Ragaller, Alexander Sappok, Leslie Bromberg, Natarajan Gunasekaran, Jason Warkins, Ryan Wilhelm
Abstract Efficient aftertreatment management requires accurate sensing of both particulate filter soot and ash levels for optimized feedback control. Currently a combination of pressure drop measurements and predictive models are used to indirectly estimate the loading state of the filter. Accurate determination of filter soot loading levels is challenging under certain operating conditions, particularly following partial regeneration events and at low flow rate (idle) conditions. This work applied radio frequency (RF)-based sensors to provide a direct measure of the particulate filter soot levels in situ. Direct measurements of the filter loading state enable advanced feedback controls to optimize the combined engine and aftertreatment system for improved DPF management. This study instrumented several cordierite and aluminum titanate diesel particulate filters with RF sensors.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0012
Sebastian Voss, Johannes Eder, Bernhard Schaetz
Abstract The growing complexity of functionalities in automotive vehicles and their safety-criticality, including timing requirements, demands sound and scalable approaches to deal with the increasing design space. Most often, such complex automotive systems are composed of a set of functions that are characterized by multi-period timing behaviors, e.g., due to environment constraints limiting sensing/acting frequencies, or various worst case execution times of software components. As safety-critical systems must perform the desired behavior within guaranteed time bounds, a valid system configuration is needed including a time-correct schedule that fulfills all timing requirements. This contribution proposes a systematic and correct schedule synthesis of complex multi-rate automotive software systems that ensures precise timing behavior of software components.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0097
Felix Gow, Lifeng Guan, Jooil Park, Jaekwon Kim
Abstract Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) has become a popular system due to regulation in many countries. TPMS consists of sensors that measure air pressure and temperature in the tires. Each sensor transmits tire information to TPMS central unit for display purpose via RF. Commercial trailers having bodies longer than 7 m require RF repeaters to increase the data transmission range. Located near to rear wheels, RF repeater receives sensor signal in the rear wheels and transmits the signal to TPMS central unit. In this paper, we discuss RF repeater which transmits at multiple frequencies in order to increase signal reception. On TPMS central unit, RF receiver is able to tune to receive frequencies used in sensors and RF repeater. Other method for improving reception is to transmit same payload multiple times at same frequency as that of sensor. In the paper, other important specifications are discussed as RF repeater design is concerned.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0096
Daniel Pachner, Jaroslav Beran, Jonathan Tigelaar
Abstract On downsized turbocharged engines, turbo speed is correlated with maximum engine airflow and therefore with maximum engine power. To ensure safe operation in the field, auto makers introduce significant engineering margins to the turbocharger maximum speed limit. Physical turbo speed sensors provide one way to reduce this engineering margin, but are not appropriate for some applications. An accurate mathematical estimation of turbocharger speed using virtual sensor can help reduce these margins, therefore increasing available power. This paper examines the best turbo speed estimation accuracy that can be achieved using a given set of production engine sensors. “Best” is defined in a minimax sense as the smallest turbo speed error interval achievable assuming the worst case combination of sensor and actuator errors and plant parameter mismatch.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3106

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