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Event
2014-12-10
New rounds of stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions reduction regulations in Europe (Euro 6c) and North America (CARB LEV III, EPA Tier 3) are driving the optimization of existing diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems. Urea - Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems are among the de-NOx technologies that have been successfully introduced in recent years. The new regulations are bringing a closer look to SCR de-NOx performance particularly during the cold start phase of the existing emissions certification cycles. This presentation will review some of the options under consideration to address cold start NOx emissions. Some of these approaches impose new and more severe requirements on the urea injection function – these are also reviewed as well as the response to these requirements by the injection system designers.
Event
2014-12-10
Event
2014-12-10
Spark-plug sized particle sensors are developing rapidly due to onboard diagnostics (OBD) regulations demand in the US and Europe and eventually worldwide. Particle sensors will be one of the key enablers for exhaust particle filters to continue their success in keeping particle emissions below or equal to the regulatory limits not only in brand new vehicles, but also in vehicle lifetime. Beyond OBD, particle sensors have numerous applications in engine research and development, retrofit technologies, environmental research and modeling, and instrumentations. Before spreading the use of particle sensors in the market place, it is critical that their performance and durability are well understood. The performance of particle sensors is critical as we need to understand what property of particulate matter (PM) do they measure (mass, number, surface area, size, etc…), the fundamentals of such measurement and the dependent variables, and how it relates to our current measurement method of PM.
Training / Education
2014-10-23
The acquisition of test data is required throughout the product's life cycle - in prototype performance evaluation, reliability/durability testing, duty-cycle analysis, end of line testing, and service and aftermarket product areas. Both lab and on-road testing is needed for components, sub-systems and entire vehicles. As in-vehicle networks become increasingly more sophisticated in terms of the number of controllers, the speed at which they communicate, and the number of parameters available, they are a virtual goldmine for the test engineer. If the data is already available on the vehicle network, the engineer may only need to add any missing sensors (or possibly none at all).
Event
2014-10-22
This session focuses on engine combustion and flow diagnostic development and demonstration. Examples of diagnostics of interest include, but are not limited to: LIF, PLIF, absorption/emission spectroscopy, ion probes, pressure sensors, and extractive and exhaust gas composition sensors.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Chunshan Li, Guoying Chen, Changfu Zong
This paper presents a fault-tolerant control (FTC) approach for four-wheel independently driven and steered (4WID/4WIS) electric vehicles. An adaptive control-based passive fault-tolerant controller is designed to improve vehicle safety, performance and maneuverability when an actuator fault happens. The proposed fault tolerant control method consists of the following three parts: 1) a fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) module that monitors vehicle driving condition, detects and diagnoses actuator failures with the inequality constraints ; 2) a motion controller that computes the generalized forces/moments to track the desired vehicle motion using Model Predictive Control (MPC); 3) a reconfigurable control allocator that redistributes the generalized forces/moments to four wheels with equality constrained optimization. The FTC approach is based on the reconfigurable control allocation which reallocates the generalized forces/moments among healthy actuators once the actuator failures is detected.
Event
2014-10-06
Evolving demands on brake systems driven by hybrid and electric vehicle architectures are providing opportunity for new component and brake system configurations and a demand for greater integration of the brake control system with overall vehicle controls. This session offers new concepts and ideas for electrically powered and controlled brake calipers, improvements in control strategies and system safety considerations.
Event
2014-10-06
Evolving demands on brake systems driven by hybrid and electric vehicle architectures are providing opportunity for new component and brake system configurations and a demand for greater integration of the brake control system with overall vehicle controls. This session offers new concepts and ideas for electrically powered and controlled brake calipers, improvements in control strategies and system safety considerations.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Alexander Sappok, Leslie Bromberg
Abstract Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) are a key component in many on- and off-road aftertreatment systems to meet increasingly stringent particle emissions limits. Efficient thermal management and regeneration control is critical for reliable and cost-effective operation of the combined engine and aftertreatment system. Conventional DPF control systems predominantly rely on a combination of filter pressure drop measurements and predictive models to indirectly estimate the soot loading state of the filter. Over time, the build-up of incombustible ash, primarily derived from metal-containing lubricant additives, accumulates in the filter to levels far exceeding the DPF's soot storage limit. The combined effects of soot and ash build-up dynamically impact the filter's pressure drop response, service life, and fuel consumption, and must be accurately accounted for in order to optimize engine and aftertreatment system performance. This work applied a radio frequency (RF) sensor to directly monitor diesel particulate filter soot and ash levels, thereby enabling direct feedback control of the filter based on its actual loading state.
Event
2014-09-25
This session will cover papers/presentations on aircraft electric actuation system (AEAS). Potential topics include all forms of electric actuation, including motors, controllers, regen power, reliability, and thermal management; how the electric actuation system impacts the power system of an aircraft; and system level benefits and impacts.
Event
2014-09-24
As sensor system proliferate across multiple platforms, particularly with the explosion of Unmanned Intelligence Systems, the desire for interoperability and interchangeability of the sensor systems across multiple platforms and multiple services has grown. This session will address SAE activities in development of standards to support interoperable/interchangeable sensors, the challenges in developing and using the standards and opportunities for future sensor interface definitions.
Event
2014-09-23
With the acquisition of ARINC by SAE, the leadership of ARINC is providing an overview of the activities of the organization, including the AEEC, AMC, and FSEMC.
Event
2014-09-23
The Department of Defense recognized the need for improvements and standardization in the area of manufacturing management because of cost, schedule, and quality problems on its weapon systems due to a lack of focus on proven manufacturing principles and practices. The Defense Standardization Council approved the development of a manufacturing management standard and established a working group to begin developing a draft standard and to select a Standards Developing Organization.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Joseph Dygert, Melissa Morris, Patrick Browning
Abstract The high demand for traditional air traffic as well as increased use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) has resulted in researchers examining alternative technologies which would result in safer, more reliable, and better performing aircraft. Active methods of aerodynamic flow control may be the most promising approach to this problem. Research in the area of aerodynamic control is transitioning from traditional mechanical flow control devices to, among other methods, plasma actuators. Plasma actuators offer an inexpensive and energy efficient method of flow control. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD), one of the most widely studied forms of plasma actuation, employs an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) device which uses dominant electric fields for actuation. Unlike traditional flow control methods, a DBD device operates without moving components or mass injection methods. Publications discussing the optimization of DBD flow control versus a single variable such as gap width, voltage, dielectric constant, etc., have been widely published, and instigated a 2003 paper published by the IEEE-DEIS-EHD Technical Committee titled “Recommended International Standard for Dimensionless Parameters Used in Electrohydrodynamics.”
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3021

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