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Viewing 1 to 30 of 15361
2016-04-04 ...
  • April 4-8, 2016 (3 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Lean burn engines (diesel and GDI) boast higher fuel economy and cleaner emissions than conventionally tuned engines while producing equivalent power. They employ higher combustion chamber compression ratios, significant air intake swirl and precise lean-metered direct fuel injection. The downfall of lean-burn technology, however, is increased exhaust NOx emissions (due to higher heat and cylinder pressure) and a somewhat narrower RPM power-band (due to slower burn rates of lean mixtures). Removal of NOx from exhausts is a critical need for emission standards and ambient ozone requirements.
2016-03-31 ...
  • March 31-April 1, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
All gasoline powered vehicles and equipment create exhaust and evaporative and refueling emissions. Unlike exhaust emissions, which occur only when the engine is operating, evaporative emissions (evap emissions) occur all the time. Controlling evap emissions to PZEV levels is as challenging as controlling exhaust emissions. It becomes even more important in the case of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and extended range electric vehicles (EREV) which generate evaporative fuel vapors, but have no place to burn/consume the vapors when the engine does not operate for extended periods of time.
2015-12-09 ...
  • December 9-11, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 30-December 2, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2015-11-04
Event
High Efficiency Combustion Systems With the increased demands for fuel efficiency and fuel economy, the internal combustion engine (ICE) continues to be examined for design enhancements to improve these measures. Overall, the program will examine several technological advances required to maximize efficiency, including: o Advanced, low-temperature combustion techniques o Improved understanding and modeling of heat loss mechanisms o Electrification and intelligent control of accessory loads o Possible redesign of mechanical systems (e.g., variable stroke for fully expanded cycles) o High-efficiency turbo-machinery to extract exhaust energy and provide boost Emissions Reduction With a greater than 10 percent growth expected in the domestic passenger vehicle market, China now has the world’s largest auto market; and emissions from transportation are growing rapidly as well.
2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
Event
The internal combustion engine has great potential for high fuel efficiency. The ideal otto and diesel cycles can easily achieve more than 70% thermodynamic efficiency. The problems come when those cycles should be implemented in a real engine. Extreme peak pressure during the cycle will call for a very robust engine structure that in turn will increase friction and hence reduce mechanical efficiency. A very high compression ratio also increase the surface to volume ratio and promote heat losses, taking away much of the benefits from the theoretical cycle. The presentation will start with a standard SI engine and it’s efficiency as a function of load. Then a high compression ratio SI with be introduced and compared with the same engine operated in HCCI mode. The four efficiencies of SI as well as HCCI will be discussed and variations like HCCI with negative valve overlap and higher mean piston speed will be shown. A next step is the results with Partially Premixed Combustion.
2015-11-04
Event
From their origins in meeting emissions and fuel economy standards, embedded control systems are now proliferating across other areas such as improved safety, comfort and convenience, connectivity, and much more. To address the consequent increase in system and software complexity, automotive industry is using Model-Based Design to design, analyze and implement the software in product development. Now, we are ushering in a new era of transformation where automotive and consumer technologies are merging and the availability of low-cost sensing, computing, and control technologies is allowing the automotive industry to create new products and lines of business. This presentation will start off with current trends in Model-Based Design application for product development, then discuss how sensing, computing, and control are impacting the automotive industry, and how model-based methods can enable you to realize the new opportunities generated by this transformation.
2015-11-04
Event
Demand for fuel efficiency and fuel economy constantly increases world-wide. Internal combustion engines and fuels represent an integrated system, continuously examined for enhancements to improve these measures. Fuel ethers are blending components used precisely to enhance performance and provide cleaner, more sustainable gasoline. As clean replacements for toxic compounds, and enablers of improved air quality through a reduction of vehicle emissions of exhaust pollutants like VOCs and PM, fuel ethers enable a global path towards more sustainable, clean, efficient, and affordable mobility. . Thanks to their naturally high octane numbers they also contribute to economies of fuel, enhancing efficient combustion of petrol, while not causing engine damage or corrosion of parts and enabling the transition to higher compression ratio, more efficient engines.
2015-10-21 ...
  • October 21-23, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • July 18-20, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • November 16-18, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Tysons, Virginia
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
On-board diagnosis of engine and transmission systems has been mandated by government regulation for light and medium vehicles since the 1996 model year. The regulations specify many of the detailed features that on-board diagnostics must exhibit. In addition, the penalties for not meeting the requirements or providing in-field remedies can be very expensive. This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how and why OBD systems function and the technical features that a diagnostic should have in order to ensure compliant and successful implementation.
2015-10-19 ...
  • October 19-20, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • March 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Stringent requirements of reduced NOx emission limits in the US have presented engineers and technical staff with numerous challenges. Several in-cylinder technical solutions have been developed for diesel engines to meet 2010 emission standards. These technologies have been optimized and have yielded impressive engine-out results in their ability to reduce emissions to extremely low levels. However, current and state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions have fallen short of achieving the limits imposed on diesel emissions for 2010.
2015-10-06
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This session discusses technologies that treat engine exhaust emissions to meet commercial vehicle requirements. The scope covers developments in catalysts, materials, controls, and integration with the complete engine/vehicle system.
2015-10-06
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-06
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-04
Event
This session will debate the interference in the development of Motorsport brake systems and brake systems or High Performance Road cars. The question will be discused whether Motorsport is a valid test field for High Performance road cars, and what synergies can be found between thess two areas.
2015-10-02 ...
  • October 2, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • April 11, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 17, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Designing more efficient and robust emission control components and exhaust systems results in more efficient performance, reduced backpressure and fuel penalty, and higher conversion efficiency. This course will help you to understand the motion of exhaust flow in both gasoline and diesel emission control components including flow-through and wall-flow devices such as catalytic converters, NOx adsorbers, diesel oxidation catalysts, diesel particulate filters as well as flow through the overall exhaust system.
2015-09-30 ...
  • September 30-October 1, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • April 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
As diesel emissions regulations have become more and more stringent, diesel particulate filters (DPF) have become possibly the most important and complex diesel aftertreatment device. This seminar covers many DPF-related topics using fundamentals from various branches of applied sciences such as porous media, filtration and materials sciences and will provide the student with both a theoretical as well as an applications-oriented approach to enhance the design and reliability of aftertreatment platforms.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2795
Jayesh Mutyal, Sourabh Shrivastava, Rana Faltsi, Markus Braun
Stringent diesel emissions standards forcing a constant reduction in discharges of particulate matter and nitrogen oxide (NOx). Current state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions are falling short of achieving these limits. Engine manufacturers are looking at different ways to meet the emission norms. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of oxides of nitrogen with ammonia gas is emerging as preferred technology for meeting stringent NOx emission standards across the world. SCR system designers face several technical challenges, such as avoiding ammonia slip, urea crystallization, low temperature deposits and other potential pitfalls. Simulation can help to develop a deep understanding of these technical challenges and issues, identify root causes and help develop better designs to overcome them. This paper describes the modeling approach for Urea-Water-Solution spray and its interaction with canister walls and exhaust gases.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2814
Rakhesh Bharathan
Simultaneous reduction of NOx and PM from engine exhaust of a diesel engine is an interesting area of research due to the implementation of stringent emission regulations all over the world. Cost involved in expensive after treatment systems such as DPF and SCR necessitate minimization of engine out pollutants. With minimum engine out emission achieved through engine hardware and combustion parameter optimization, possibility of elimination or downsizing of the after treatment system can be explored. The paper presents the effect of fuel injection parameters and EGR rate on exhaust emission of a boosted diesel engine. Effects of parameters such as rail pressure, pilot-post injections, SOI, EGR rate and EGR temperature on a 4 cylinder two valve direct injection diesel engine is studied. Present study reveals the possibility of elimination of after treatment systems at BS IV level with optimization of engine hardware and combustion parameters.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2889
Saravana Venkatesh R, Sunil Pandey, Sathyanandan Mahadevan
In heavy duty diesel engines, Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is often preferred choice to contain NOx emissions. Critical to such EGR fitted engines is the design of air intake pipe and intake manifold combination in view of proper EGR gas mixing with intake air. The variation in EGR mass fraction at each intake ports should be as minimal as possible and this variation must be contained within +/- 10% band to have a minimal cylinder to cylinder variation of pollutants. EGR homogeneity for various intake configurations were studied using 3D CFD for a 4 cylinder 3.8 L diesel fuel, common rail system, turbocharged and intercooled heavy duty engine. Flow field was studied in the computational domain from the point before EGR mixing till all the four intake ports. EGR mass fraction variation at each intake port was calculated from this analysis after carrying out an experimental validation of the CFD model.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2810
Piotr Lijewski, Jerzy Merkisz, Pawel Fuc, Maciej Siedlecki, Andrzej Ziolkowski
The paper describes the measurement of PM emission from an excavator engine under actual operating conditions. The exploration of the relations between the engine operating parameters and its emissions requires measurements under actual conditions of engine operation. The specificity of the emission measurements, PM in particular, requires technologically advanced measuring devices. The situation gets even more complicated when, beside the PM mass, we also need to obtain the PM size distribution and particle number (PN). An important technical issue is the difficulty in fitting the measurement equipment in/on the vehicle in operation (e.g. excavator), which is why the presented investigations were carried out in a laboratory under simulated operation. The laboratory technicians applied load to the engines through the excavator hydraulic system.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2771
Kevin A. Newman, Paul Dekraker, Houshun Zhang, James Sanchez, Prashanth Gururaja
In designing a regulatory vehicle simulation program for determining greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel consumption, it is necessary to estimate the performance of technologies, verify compliance with the regulatory standards, and estimate the overall benefits of the program. The agencies developed the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Model (GEM) to serve these purposes. GEM is currently being used to certify the fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of the Phase 1 rulemaking for all heavy-duty vehicles except pickups and vans, which require a chassis dyno test for certification. While the version of the GEM used in Phase 1 contains most of the technical and mathematical features needed to run a vehicle simulation, the model lacks sophistication. For example, Phase 1 GEM only models manual transmissions and it does not include engine torque interruption during gear shifting.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 15361

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