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2015-10-04
Event
This session is looking for abstracts that are focused around what effect designing a vehicle that optimizes fuel economy with minimum environmental impact has on creating an optimized braking system efficiency. Can this be done or does something have to give?
2015-04-24 ...
  • April 24, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 2, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Attendees to the seminars held in conjunction with the SAE 2015 World Congress will receive COMPLETE access to Congress activities for only $55 per day. If interested, please contact our Customer Service department at +1.877.606.7323 (U.S. and Canada only) or +1.724.776.4970 (outside U.S. and Canada) to register for this special Congress daily rate. Designing more efficient and robust emission control components and exhaust systems results in more efficient performance, reduced backpressure and fuel penalty, and higher conversion efficiency.
2015-04-21
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2015-04-21
Event
This session covers the complete particulate filter system. There are papers covering the DOC aging as well as the effect of high sulfur fuel on the DOC. A couple of paper study the effect of ash accumulation and two papers cover a novel new asymmetric cell design and modeling of this new design. Finally we have a paper on gasoline particulate filters.
2015-04-21
Event
Papers are invited on technology developments and the integration of these technologies into new emission control systems. Topics include the integration of various diesel particulate matter (PM) and diesel Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) reduction technologies plus analogous technologies for the growing population of direct injection gasoline engines. Novel developments in sensors and control systems will also be considered.
2015-04-21
Event
These sessions will focus on ‘Advances in NOx Reduction Technology’. The topics covered will include: new materials for lean NOx traps (LNT) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR); system integration and durability; advances in NOx catalyst substrates, novel reductants and mixing designs.
2015-04-21
Event
Papers are invited for this session on the general topics of combustion engine gaseous emissions (regulated and non-regulated). This includes papers discussing well-to-wheels CO2 production for alternative technologies, fuel economy and all greenhouse gas emission research with their primary focus on engine, emissions, fuels, control or related components or sub-components within. It also includes hydrocarbon species and specific NOx species production over aftertreatment devices as a result of changes in fuel specification and the inclusion of bio-derived components and consideration of secondary emissions production (slip) as a result of aftertreatment. (Papers focusing on vehicle-system approach on fuel economy should be directed to PFL370.)
2015-04-21
Event
Papers are invited for this session on particle emissions from combustion engines, including measurement and testing methods, and the effects of changes in fuel composition. Papers are also invited on the topics of the environmental and health effects of elemental carbon and organic carbon that constitutes solid cored particles plus the environmental and health effects of secondary organic aerosol emissions. This includes particulate emissions from both gasoline and diesel engines.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1631
Michinori Tani, Atsuhiro Miyauchi, Yoshiaki Matsuzono
Stringent emission regulations for passenger vehicles are demanded. Reducing costs of high-grade exhaust gas after-treatment systems is necessary. The demand for high-precision engine air-fuel ratio control remains high. Higher efficiency in development and shortening of the development period are required, and control system construction that is accomplished in a short period regardless of the developer's technical skills and can harness the hardware potential has become essential. To achieve high-precision control, there is a trial-and-error element in configuration such as feedback-gain settings, and the tradeoff between high-precision air-fuel ratio control and shortening of the development period. We investigated a system based on a control method that constantly performs optimum air-fuel ratio feedback control to suit air-fuel ratio sensor responsiveness that changes with vehicle driving conditions, and eliminates the trial-and-error element.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1001
Shinichiro Otsuka, Yukio Suehiro, Hiroshi Koyama, Yoshiaki Matsuzono, Cameron Tanner, David Bronfenbrenner, Tinghong Tao, Kenneth Twiggs
The necessity of reducing the emission of CO, HC, and NOx air pollutants from automobiles into the atmosphere is paramount; the regulations are becoming stricter. The emission at right after engine start accounts for most of the emission of these pollutants. If the catalyst could be warmed up quickly after engine start, it would reduce emissions. A three-way catalyst warms from the heat of the emissions being discharged from the engine. Heating the emissions to a high temperature and reducing the weights of the three-way catalyst and the three-way catalyst-coated substrate are effective for warming the catalyst. However, heating the emissions to a high temperature reduces the thermal efficiency of the engine. The method involving lightening the three-way catalyst by reducing the coating promotes sintering of the precious metals of the catalyst, and leads to reduction of the emissions purification.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1003
Tomohito Kakema, Yukio Suehiro, Yoshiaki Matsuzono, Takeshi Narishige, Masanori Hashimoto
Demand for the metal rhodium, (Rh) used in automotive catalysts, is high. We developed a catalyst using palladium (Pd) instead. Removing the Rh from the existing catalyst resulted in a decline in nitrogen oxide (NOx) purification. This results from a difference in the characteristics of Rh and Pd. Rh’s purification speed of three harmful substances in exhaust gas (CO, HC, and NOx) is greater than Pd; because its NO dissociation enthalpy is low it readily dissociates NO, resulting in excellent NOx purification performance. This is because Rh maintains high dispersion even under high-temperature conditions. We duplicate the purification performance of Rh using another metal (Pd). It boosted NOx purification performance via reverse electron donation from Pd to NO realized by electron donation from a support material with enhanced basicity, encouraging the dissociation of NOx into N and O.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1002
Yuichiro Murata, Tomoko Morita, Katsuji Wada, Hiroshi Ohno
Efforts have been implemented to improve the efficiency of internal combustion engines with the object of reduction of CO2. Improving the efficiency of these engines can be accompanied by lowering the temperature of exhaust. To attain a higher efficiency of the internal combustion engine, it is necessary to combine it with an emission purification system which enables it to purify controlled substances in a low exhaust temperature. About a half amount of the controlled exhaust substances is emitted at cold start. Hydrocarbon (HC) trap using zeolite is known as a means for decreasing HC at cold start. NOx storage catalyst (NSC) is also known as a NOx adsorption catalyst. NSC can adsorb NOx by oxidizing NO to NO2 in an oxygen excess atmosphere. It is regarded as difficult to adsorb and hold NOx in low temperature. We propose the Three Way Catalyst on reducing emission. N-TWC has NOx adsorption characteristics in a low temperature condition before TWC becomes active.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0993
Timothy Johnson
This paper will discuss the current state of the industry; where it needs to go and how to get there.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0994
Hiroyuki Kojima, Michael Fischer, Hisao Haga, Naoki Ohya, Kensuke Nishi, Takuya Mito, Naoko Fukushi
We studied the Urea-SCR system as the after-treatment system to convert NOx emissions. NOx conversion efficiency of the SCR depends on the exhaust gas temperature and NO2/NOx ratio in the gas emission. We increased the temperature on the SCR catalyst .A disadvantage of this is the fuel penalty under the low gas temperature in city driving. One solution for this is DPF coating with SCR catalyst (SCRF) and to move the SCR catalyst closer to the engine. SCRF’s function is not only NOx conversion but also to trap and regenerate the particulate matter. NOx conversion efficiency of SCRF is lower than the honeycomb SCR. Urea water evaporates and diffuses in the limited space between DOC and SCRF to achieve a homogeneous NH3 distribution and stores it in the SCR catalyst. We propose extending the exhaust pipe for even NH3 distribution and adding the honeycomb SCR under the floor. A solution is the honeycomb SCR added to the closely-coupled converter.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1030
Ashok Kumar, Krishna Kamasamudram, Neal Currier, Aleksey Yezerets
The high global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N2O) led to its inclusion in the list of regulated pollutants under the emerging greenhouse gas regulations. The mitigation of N2O on aftertreatment catalysts is not effective as its formation and decomposition temperatures do not overlap. Therefore it was imperative to understand the sources of N2O formation so that its emission can be minimized. In a typical SCR aftertreatment system, a main contributor to tailpipe N2O is the undesired of reaction between NOx and NH3 over SCR catalyst and NH3 slip in to ASC part of which will be oxidized to N2O. Apart from exhaust gas conditions such as NOx and NH3 concentrations, NO2/NOx ratio, temperature, the selectivity to N2O is impacted by the nature of the redox sites. For example, Cu-zeolites based SCR catalysts are inherently more selective to N2O and also can slip more NH3 as compared to Fe-zeolite and Vanadia based SCR catalysts.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0988
Fabien Ocampo, Virginie harle, Naotaka Ohtake, Renaud ROHE, Barry W.L. Southward
Among the existing regulations on pollutants in automotive exhaust gases, meeting NOx standards remain the most challenging task. Engine calibration and EGR development helped in that direction. However, improving catalysts performance is key to achieve the requested levels of emission. Lean NOx Trap (LNT) has been introduced in serial production several years ago for Diesel and GDI applications. Today, this technology coexists with the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) to meet EURO6 regulation standards for diesel vehicles. LNT is generally preferred for small engine vehicles (up to 1.6-2L) whereas SCR is used for bigger engine vehicles. The tightening of the regulation and particularly the evolution of the homologation testing cycle procedures (WLPT cycle, RDE to be introduced) will require the evolution of the NOx control strategies with a particular focus on low temperature NOx elimination.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0987
Sam Barros, William Atkinson
Increasingly more stringent emissions standards for Diesel engines have accounted for an increase in the end-user cost of a modern diesel by over 40% over the last 10 years, most of which is due to complex and expensive emissions after treatment devices such as Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), which relies on a second tank of Urea to be injected into a catalyst bed to remove Nitrogen Oxide emissions from the engine exhaust. Prior to the current emissions standards the Diesel industry had been able to meet NOx levels by reducing the combustion temperature in the engine via charge gas dilution, through cooled EGR. Although successful in reducing emissions, large levels of EGR have serious undesirable effects on oil quality, engine longevity, overall efficiency and warranty returns. There is also a limit to the efficacy of EGR in lowering NOx emissions such that at the current EPA mandated 0.2g/kWh, it is no longer sufficient.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1020
Joel Michelin, Philippe Nappez, Frederic Guilbaud, Christof Hinterberger, Eric Ottaviani, Catherine gauthier, Philippe Maire, Thierry Couturier
Future Diesel emission standards for passenger cars, light and medium duty vehicles, require the combination of a more efficient NOx reduction performance along with the opportunity to reduce the complexity and the package requirements to facilitate it. Recent activities on catalytic product allows for the SCR active compounds to move from the ceramic substrate located in the underbody to the DPF substrate already located in close coupled position to achieve the benefit of the highest temperature. This newly developed SCR coated DPF has massively improved the potential of NOX reduction. As published in the SAE-2014-0132 advanced compact mixer BlueBox it’s crucial to inject Adblue®/DEF with very high mixing performance level. The benefit of using the SCR coated DPF in combination with a high performance compact mixer has been demonstrated, however new vehicle platform development increase the challenge for exhaust system packaging constraints.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1028
Paul Gaynor, Benjamin Reid, Graham Hargrave, Thomas Lockyer, Jonathan Wilson
In recent years urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has become the principal method of NOx abatement within heavy duty (HD) diesel exhaust systems; however, with upcoming applications demanding NOx reduction efficiencies of above 96 % on engines producing upwards of 10 g•kWh-1 NOx, future diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) dosing systems will be required to operate stably at significantly increased dosing rates. Developing a dosing system capable of meeting the increased performance requirements demands a full understanding of how DEF sprays interact with changing exhaust flows. This study has investigated four production systems representing a diverse range of dosing strategies in order to determine how performance is influenced by spray structure and identify promising strategies for further development. The construction of an optically accessible hot-air flow rig has enabled visualisation of DEF injection into flows representative of HD diesel exhaust conditions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1082
Xin Wang, Yunshan Ge, Linlin Liu, Huiming Gong
As a cheap, clean alternative, neat methanol and methanol gasoline are widely used as vehicle fuel in many provinces in China. Though burning methanol is able to curb carbonaceous pollutants from engine, NOx and carbonyls, in particular formaldehyde, remain concerns over atmospheric environment and public health. In this paper, regulated, carbonyl emissions together with particulate matter from a neat methanol/gasoline dual-fuel passenger car were examined over New European Driving Cycle (NEDC). The results yielded that, CO, HC and NOx from different fuel regimes were very similar. 14 kinds of carbonyl compounds in the exhaust samples were analyzed. In comparison with gasoline baseline, approximately 41.9% more carbonyls, majority of which were formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propyl aldehyde and benzaldehyde, were discharged by methanol fuelling. Regarding particulate matter, a remarkable decrease of 63% in mass was obtained by fuelling with methanol.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1078
Zhigang Chai, Fujun Zhang, Bolan Liu, Ying Huang, Xiaowei Ai
It was found that biodiesel has a great potential to reduce the nitrogen oxides (NOx) and soot simultaneously in low-temperature combustion (LTC) mode. The objective of this study was to investigate the combustion and emission characteristics of 20% biodiesel blend diesel fuel (B20) under several EGR for LTC application. An experimental investigation of B20 was conducted on a four-stroke direct injection diesel engine at 2000rpm and 25% load condition. The EGR rate was adjusted from 10% to 65%, and the injection pressure was tuned from 100MPa to 140MPa. The result showed that soot increased with the promotion of EGR rate under 50%, while between 50% and 65% EGR rate region the soot decreased dramatically and NOx emission performed at almost zero level, meanwhile the ignition delay was prolonged by more than 40%. Compare to the conventional diesel, the soot emission of B20 emerged decrease tendency at the same EGR rate condition.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 8149

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