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Viewing 1 to 30 of 8009
Event
2014-12-10
Event
2014-12-10
Pd based catalysts has not been considered sufficient for converting methane to carbon dioxide for lean-CNG applications mainly in terms of durability, which finally impact the performance on long period. In the present investigation, we were addressed the substantial improvement of Pd-based catalyst with respect to its durability and initial activity. To obtain this, primarily the improvement was mainly achieved based on the new insight on the deactivation routes of Pd-based catalysts under normal operating condition of lean-CNG engines using various physicochemical tools. In addition, optimal engine control logic was carried in second stage of catalysts development by keeping the catalyst more durable. The system, comprised of improved Pd-based catalyst and engine control logic, has demonstrated the capability of complying EURO-6 regulations.
Event
2014-12-10
The automotive industry is facing a combination of challenges over the next decade. Fuel economy regulations are increasing for light-duty vehicles, and U.S. EPA Tier 3 emissions standards are requiring lower tailpipe emissions. Advanced combustion techniques are being pursued to enable improved fuel economy, and lower NOx and PM emissions can be obtained by the more homogeneous combustion from these techniques. However, CO and HC emissions are often higher from advanced combustion engines, and the higher efficiency of these engines results in lower exhaust temperatures. The combination of higher CO and HC emissions with lower exhaust temperatures challenges conventional oxidation catalysts. Thus, new catalyst technologies are being pursued to lower light-off temperatures to enable emissions compliance. Research on novel catalyst formulations for control of CO and HC emissions will be presented.
Event
2014-12-09
Event
2014-12-09
Event
2014-12-09
The proposed legislative requirements on particle number emissions for EU6c and the reduced particle mass emission limits of CARB LEV-III / EPA Tier-3 pose a new challenge in the development of gasoline direct injection engines. Bosch is actively pursuing system level solutions, including the development of next generation DI injection systems, to aid OEMs in meeting the new legislative requirements without the need for additional exhaust gas after-treatment or penalties in fuel economy. This presentation will highlight key development areas and show system level pathways to successfully address these challenges.
Event
2014-12-09
Event
2014-12-09
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session pertain to studies of exhaust emission control and the emission effects from fuels, engine controls, engine design, combuston quality, catalytic converters, diesel particulate filters, and other aftertreatment. The focus of the session is on reducing emissions and meeting international emission standards.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session pertain to studies of exhaust emission control and the emission effects from fuels, engine controls, engine design, combuston quality, catalytic converters, diesel particulate filters, and other aftertreatment. The focus of the session is on reducing emissions and meeting international emission standards.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session pertain to studies of exhaust emission control and the emission effects from fuels, engine controls, engine design, combuston quality, catalytic converters, diesel particulate filters, and other aftertreatment. The focus of the session is on reducing emissions and meeting international emission standards.
Training / Education
2014-11-11
Lean burn engines (diesel and GDI) boast higher fuel economy and cleaner emissions than conventionally tuned engines while producing equivalent power. They employ higher combustion chamber compression ratios, significant air intake swirl and precise lean-metered direct fuel injection. The downfall of lean-burn technology, however, is increased exhaust NOx emissions (due to higher heat and cylinder pressure) and a somewhat narrower RPM power-band (due to slower burn rates of lean mixtures). Removal of NOx from exhausts is a critical need for emission standards and ambient ozone requirements. This three session web seminar will examine the various catalytic processes for lean burn applications, including Selective Catalytic NOx Reduction (SCR), NOx Trap Technologies (i.e. LNT, NSR), and the combination of SCR, NOx Trap and Hydrocarbon NOx Reduction (LNC). It will focus in on SCR NOx fundamentals, equipping participants with the basic concepts for NOx control and important design parameters for SCR NOx catalyst.
Event
2014-10-22
Papers are invited for this session on particle emissions from combustion engines, including measurement and testing methods, and the effects of changes in fuel composition. Papers are also invited on the topics of the environmental and health effects of elemental carbon and organic carbon that constitutes solid cored particles plus the environmental and health effects of secondary organic aerosol emissions. This includes particulate emissions from both gasoline and diesel engines.
Event
2014-10-22
Papers are invited for this session on particle emissions from combustion engines, including measurement and testing methods, and the effects of changes in fuel composition. Papers are also invited on the topics of the environmental and health effects of elemental carbon and organic carbon that constitutes solid cored particles plus the environmental and health effects of secondary organic aerosol emissions. This includes particulate emissions from both gasoline and diesel engines.
Event
2014-10-20
Papers for this session on the general topic of combustion engine gaseous emissions (regulated and non-regulated). This includes hydrocarbon species production over aftertreatment devices as a result of changes in fuel specification and the inclusion of bio-derived components, specific NOx species production over catalytic devices, well-to-wheels CO2 production for alternative technologies and consideration of secondary emissions production (slip) as a result of aftertreatment.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Juan J. Hernández, Rosario Ballesteros, Javier Barba, José Guillén-Flores
In order to reduce the pollutant emissions (mainly NOx and PM) of diesel engines, the addition of small gaseous fuel amounts (such as natural gas, biogas, reforming gas, LPG) or dual mode operation (in which a pilot injection of diesel fuel promotes the gaseous fuel combustion) have been proved as potential techniques. This paper is focused on a detailed characterization of the particles emitted from a single cylinder diesel engine when part of the reference diesel fuel (10 and 20% by energy) is replaced by a gaseous fuel (producer gas, mainly composed by H2, CO and CH4) coming from biomass steam gasification (renewable fuel which has not been previously analyzed when used in diesel engines). The engine was operated at constant speed and torque, varying the EGR rate (0 and 15%). Particle samples were collected by means of fiber glass filters placed in a dilution mini-tunnel for both to determine the particle mass and for further characterization. Simultaneously, during tests, part of the exhaust gas was conducted to a system formed by two diluters and a SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) to obtain the particle size distribution.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Maria Bogarra, Angel Ramos, Daniel Fennell, Jose Herreros, Andrew York, Paul Millington, Athanasios Tsolakis
Over last few years gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines have become popular in high performance transportation vehicles due to several attractive advantages (e.g. fuel economy, improved power, downsizing, knock resistance, reduced gaseous emissions) over preceding engine technologies (e.g. port injection). GDI engines however are associated with high levels of particulate matter (PM) emissions, which is a major concern on account of the new emission legislation. Thus, this research work is focused on the possible advantages that on-board hydrogen production in the exhaust gas fuel reforming process can offer on PM emissions from the GDI combustion. The potential benefits of reformate, a rich hydrogen gas, on different components of PM emissions (soot and organic material) under different injection strategies. On the other hand, it is well-known the uncertainties related to the measurement of particulates due to the different phenomena occurring in the exhaust pipe (e.g. collision, agglomeration, etc.), sampling lines and dilution system (e.g. adsorption, condensation and nucleation of hydrocarbons) which modify the nature and/or alter the characteristics of particulates formed in the combustion chamber.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Matthew McAllister, Stephen Smith, Paul Kapus, Khai Vidmar, Alexander Hochnetz
This paper describes the findings of a design, simulation and test study into how to reduce particulate number (Pn) emissions in order to meet EU6c legislative limits. The objective of the study was to evaluate the Pn potential of a modern 6-cylinder engine with respect to hardware and calibration when fitted to a full size SUV. Having understood this capability, the combustion system was redesigned and the calibration was optimised in order to meet an engineering target Pn value of 3x1011 in the NEDC drive cycle. Extensive design and CFD work was conducted to refine the inlet port, piston crown and injector spray pattern in order to reduce surface wetting and improve air to fuel mixing homogeneity. The design and CFD steps are reported within this paper along with the results compared to target. The ECU software was optimised in order to allow for calibration strategies leading to minimised wall interaction of injected fuel. The Pn optimisation by calibration measures with the improved combustion system followed a specific development process.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Christoph Menne, Simon Galbraith, Alan Jones, Lars Henning, Thomas koerfer
In September 2013 the Jaguar XF 2.2l ECO sport brake and saloon were introduced to the European market. They are the first Jaguar vehicles to realize CO2 emissions below 130 g/km. To achieve the significantly reduced fuel consumption values with an existing 2.2l I4 Diesel engine architecture selected air path and fuel path components were optimized for increased engine efficiency. Hardware selection and development in the available short time frame were only enabled by the consequent utilization of the most advanced CAE tools throughout the design phase but also during the complete vehicle application process. Changes to the base engine architecture were ruled out at the beginning of the project due to the implications on manufacturing complexity and the limited given time frame for realization. To allow a fuel consumption reduction of more than 10% vs. the first introduction of the 2.2l I4 Diesel in XF the following measures were identified: - Improved combustion efficiency due to more advanced centre of combustion for most engine operating points - Improved fuel spray and mixture preparation - Air path with reduced pressure losses especially for the high pressure exhaust gas recirculation - significantly enhanced cooling performance of the high pressure exhaust recirculation path - downspeeding with advanced transmission control The potential of the listed measures and their interactions, the chosen hardware components and the used development and application methodologies shall be presented in this paper.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Kihyung Joo, Jin Woo Park, Jin-ha Lee, Seok-Jae Kim, Seungbeom Yoo
In diesel engine development, the new technology is coming out to meet the stringent exhaust emission regulation. The regulation demands more eco-friendly vehicles. Euro6c demands to meet not only WLTP mode, but also RDE(Real Driving Emission). In order to satisfy RDE mode, the new technology to reduce emissions should cover all operating areas including High Load & High Speed. It is a big challenge to reduce NOx on the RDE mode and a lot of DeNOx technologies are being developed. So the new DeNOx technology is needed to cover widened operating area and strict acceleration/deacceleration. The existing LNT(Lean NOx Trap) and Urea SCR(Selective Catalytic Reduction) is necessary to meet the typical NEDC or WLTP, but the RDE mode demands the powerful DeNOx technology. Therefore, the LNT & Urea SCR on DPF was developed through this study. This complex new technology consists of new catalysts(to reduce emissions), insulation(to improve fuel economy, and catalytic performance) , and logical controller(to control DeNOx and DePM strategy).
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Aayush Mehrotra, Simhachalam Juttu, Siva Subramanian Ravishankar, Ghodke Pundlik Rambhaji
Cooling EGR & improving its mixing with air has given consistent improvement in diesel emissions, hence the evolution of superior cooling technologies & low pressure EGR helps in meeting stringent diesel emission norms. For the same volume of exhaust gas, cooled exhaust gas occupies lower volume for the same mass; thereby it is possible for engine to digest more amount of EGR or air depending upon the trade off and substantially improve the heat carrying capacity of exhaust gas. Lowering the temperature of EGR gives a great potential in reducing NOx and smoke in diesel engines, it helps in lowering the EGR mixture temperature and hence reducing the in cylinder temperature. An attempt has been made here to lower the EGR temperature downstream of a conventional cooler without changing the cooler design itself. For this, the source for coolant has been taken from radiator outlet unlike the conventional location of cylinder block. A 12 V electric pump circulates coolant to EGR cooler with a bypass from radiator; since the radiator outlet is much cooler than cylinder block outlet the cooling efficiency increases significantly.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Kristin Götz, Anja Singer, Olaf Schröder, Christoph Pabst, Axel Munack, Jürgen Bünger, Juergen Krahl
The political and economic major aim in Europe is the increase of the use of renewable energy resources up to 10 % till 2020. This means a reduction in crude oil dependency. Already well known in diesel fuel area are fatty acid methyl esters, named biodiesel. However, this biogenic component has not only advantages, as a further raise of the amount of biodiesel content in diesel fuel higher than seven percent can lead to an increase of the engine oil dilution in passenger cars with diesel particulate filters. Because of the regeneration of the particulate filters, the entry of fuel components increases. This may induce sludge formation in the engine oil. A promising approach to reduce this problem is a new type of biogenic fuel, called HVO (hydrotreated vegetable oil). This is also produced from vegetable oil or animal fat and it is chemically quite similar to fossil diesel fuel. Like biodiesel, HVO is free of sulfur or any aromatics. HVO has a higher cetane number in comparison to biodiesel and most diesel fuels.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Benjamin Kingsbury, Jonathan Stewart, Zhentao Wu, Roy Douglas, Kang Li
This study describes an innovative monolith structure designed for applications in automotive catalysis using an advanced manufacturing approach developed at Imperial College London. The production process combines extrusion with phase inversion of a ceramic-polymer-solvent mixture in order to design substrate micro-structures that offer improvements in performance, including reduced PGM loading, reduced catalyst ageing and reduced backpressure. The novel substrate is formed from hollow fibres which are fused together to form a ceramic monolith. A highly ordered micro-structure is present, formed from micro-channels which extend from the inner surface to the outer surface of the hollow fibres. The entrances to the micro-channels are in the range of 10 – 90 μm and are directly accessible to the exhaust gas as it passes along the substrate. The designed micro-structure generates a geometric surface area of 32,000 m²/m³, while at the same time achieving a 40-70 % reduction in pressure drop along the length of the substrate.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 8009

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