Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 6725
2017-11-13 ...
  • November 13-15, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
On-board diagnosis of engine and transmission systems has been mandated by government regulation for light and medium vehicles since the 1996 model year. The regulations specify many of the detailed features that on-board diagnostics must exhibit. In addition, the penalties for not meeting the requirements or providing in-field remedies can be very expensive. This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how and why OBD systems function and the technical features that a diagnostic should have in order to ensure compliant and successful implementation.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2244
Shui Yu, Xiao Yu, Zhenyi Yang, Meiping Wang, Jimi Tjong, Ming Zheng
The fuel efficiency improvement of gasoline engines can be achieved through lean burn and/or exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, the ignition of a diluted cylinder charge tends to be more diverged, owing to the slower ignition and combustion processes. The operable range of diluted combustion in gasoline engines is often limited, e.g. with lambda below 2.0 or EGR rate lower than 30%, owing to the deterioration in mixture ignitability and severe cyclic variations. In addition, the adoption of intensified cylinder charge motion requires further optimizations of ignition system, including the igniter geometric configurations and the temporal modulations over ignition energy delivery and spark discharge pattern. In this work, a variety of spark ignition approaches are investigated to improve the ignition of diluted gasoline engine under homogeneous mixture mode. A spatially distributed spark arcing control is realized based on a three-pole igniter.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2366
Wenzheng Xia, Yi Zheng, Xiaokun He, Dongxia Yang, Huifang Shao, Joesph Remias, Joseph Roos, Yinhui Wang
Because of the increased use of gasoline direct engine (GDI) in automobile industry, there is a significant need to control particulates from GDI engines based on emission regulations. One potential technical approach is the utilization of a gasoline particulate filter (GPF). The successful adoption of this emission control technology needs to take many aspects into consideration and requires a system approach for optimization. This study conducted research to investigate the impact of vehicle driving cycles, fuel properties, catalyst coating on the performance of GPF. It was found that driving cycle has significant impact on particulate emission. Fuel quality still plays a role in particulate emissions, and can affect the GPF performance. Catalyzed GPF is preferred for soot regeneration, especially for the case that the vehicle operation is dominated by congested city driving condition, i.e. low operating temperatures. The details of the study are presented in the paper.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2384
Ijhar H. Rusli, Svetlana Aleksandrova, Humberto Medina, Stephen F. Benjamin
The effect of the residual swirl from the turbocharger turbine on the catalyst flow distribution has been investigated experimentally and numerically. A swirling flow rig with a moving-block swirl generator was used to generate swirling flow in a sudden expansion diffuser with a wash-coated diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) downstream. Hot-wire anemometry (HWA) was used to measure the axial and tangential velocities of the swirling flow upstream of the diffuser expansion and the axial velocity downstream the monolith. Pressure along the diffuser wall was measured using Scanivalve pressure scanners. With no swirl, the results show that the flow is highly non-uniform in the catalyst monolith with maximum velocities near the diffuser axis. High non-uniformity is also exhibited at high swirl levels with highest velocities near the diffuser wall. An intermediate swirl level exists where the flow is uniform.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2405
Christophe Chaillou, Alexandre Bouet, Arnaud Frobert, Florence Duffour
Fuels from crude oil are the main energy vectors used in the transport sector but these fuels associated to CI engines are nowadays often criticized. Nevertheless, engine and fuel co-research is one of the main leverage to reduce both CO2 footprint and criteria pollutants. CI engines, with gasoline-like fuels, are a promising way for NOx and particulates emission abatement while keeping lower CO2 emission. To introduce a new fuel/engine technology, investigations of pollutants are mandatory. Previous work [1] already studied the behavior of low RON gasoline soot generated with a CI engine. The aim of this paper is to assess the impact of such fuel/engine technology on the HC emissions and on the DOC behavior. HC speciation is performed upstream and downstream DOC. Warm-up and efficiency are also tested for different operating conditions. Then, exothermal capacities are considered to ensure high level of temperature for DPF regeneration.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2369
Prakash Arunachalam, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal, Marcus Thern
Humid air motor (HAM) is an engine operated with humidified inlet charge. System simulations study on HAM showed the waste heat recovery potential over a conventional system. An HAM setup was constructed, to comprehend the potential benefits in real-time, the HAM setup was built around a 13-litre six cylinder Volvo diesel engine. The HAM engine process is explained in detail in this paper. Emission analysis is also performed for all three modes of operation. The experiments were carried out at part load operating point of the engine to understand the effects of humidified charge on combustion, efficiency, and emissions. Experiments were conducted without EGR, with EGR, and with humidified inlet charge. These three modes of operation provided the potential benefits of each system. Exhaust heat was used for partial humidification process. Results show that HAM operation, without compromising on efficiency, reduces NOx and soot significantly over the engine operated without EGR.
2017-09-25 ...
  • September 25, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Garden Grove, California
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
On-board diagnostics, required by governmental regulations, provide a means for reducing harmful pollutants into the environment. Since being mandated in 1996, the regulations have continued to evolve and require engineers to design systems that meet strict guidelines. This one day seminar is designed to provide an overview of the fundamental design objectives and the features needed to achieve those objectives for generic on-board diagnostics. The basic structure of an on-board diagnostic will be described along with the system definitions needed for successful implementation.
2017-09-11 ...
  • September 11-12, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Meeting the requirements of heavy-duty engine emissions regulations is a challenge for all engine manufacturers. Since the introduction of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) in medium and heavy-duty diesel engines, these systems have become more sophisticated and tightly integrated with emission control systems. This 2-day seminar will explore the advantages and disadvantages of EGR and the most effective implementation of various EGR systems. This seminar will begin by defining EGR and why it is used in diesel engines, along with an explanation of the mechanisms by which EGR is able to reduce NOx.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0084
Giacomo Belgiorno, Nikolaos Dimitrakopoulos, Gabriele Di Blasio, Carlo Beatrice, Martin Tuner, Per Tunestal
Abstract In this paper, a parametric analysis on the main engine calibration parameters applied on gasoline Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is performed. Theoretically, the PPC concept permits to improve both the engine efficiencies and the NOx-soot trade-off simultaneously compared to the conventional diesel combustion. This work is based on the design of experiments (DoE), statistical approach, and investigates on the engine calibration parameters that might affect the efficiencies and the emissions of a gasoline PPC. The full factorial DoE analysis based on three levels and three factors (33 factorial design) is performed at three engine operating conditions of the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Cycles (WLTC). The pilot quantity (Qpil), the crank angle position when 50% of the total heat is released (CA50), and the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) factors are considered. The goal is to identify an engine calibration with high efficiency and low emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0066
Maria Cristina Cameretti, Roberta De Robbio, Raffaele Tuccillo
The present study deals with the simulation of a Diesel engine fuelled by natural gas/diesel in dual fuel mode to optimize the engine behaviour in terms of performance and emissions. In dual fuel mode, the natural gas is introduced into the engine’s intake system. Near the end of the compression stroke, diesel fuel is injected and ignites, causing the natural gas to burn. The engine itself is virtually unaltered, but for the addition of a gas injection system. The CO2 emissions are considerably reduced because of the lower carbon content of the fuel. Furthermore, potential advantages of dual-fuel engines include diesel-like efficiency and brake mean effective pressure with much lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter. In previous papers [1, 2, 3], the authors have presented some CFD results obtained by the KIVA 3V and Fluent codes by varying the diesel/NG ratio and the diesel pilot injection timing at different loads.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0070
Stefano D'Ambrosio, Daniele Iemmolo, Alessandro Mancarella, Nicolò Salamone, Roberto Vitolo, Gilles Hardy
A precise estimation of the recirculated exhaust gas rate and oxygen concentration as well as a predictive evaluation of the possible EGR unbalance among cylinders are of paramount importance, especially if non-conventional combustion modes, which require high EGR flowrates, are implemented. In the present paper, starting from the equation related to convergent nozzles, the EGR mass flow-rate is modeled considering the pressure and the temperature upstream of the EGR control valve, as well as the pressure downstream of it. The restricted flow-area at the valve-seat passage and the discharge coefficient are carefully assessed as functions of the valve lift. Other models were fitted using parameters describing the engine working conditions as inputs, following a semi-physical and a purely statistical approach. The resulting models are then applied to estimate EGR rates to both conventional and non-conventional combustion conditions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0123
Christopher Eck, Futoshi Nakano
Small commercial vehicles (SCV) with Diesel engines require efficient exhaust aftertreatment systems to reduce the emissions while keeping the fuel consumption and total operating cost as low as possible. To meet current emission legislations in all cases, a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and diesel particulate filter (DPF) and some NOx treatment device (e.g. a lean NOx trap or selective catalytic reduction, SCR) are required. Creating a cost-effective SCV also requires to keep the cost for the aftertreatment system as low as possible because the contribution to total vehicle cost is high. By using more sophisticated and more robust operating strategies and control algorithms, the hardware cost can be reduced. To keep the calibration effort at a low level, it is necessary to apply only algorithms which have a time-efficient calibration procedure. This paper will focus on the active regeneration of the DPF.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0125
Angelo Algieri, Pietropaolo Morrone, Jessica Settino, Teresa Castiglione, Sergio Bova
In the last years automotive researchers and manufacturers are focusing a large attention on the development and the optimisation of aftertreatment systems able to meet the ever more severe regulations on exhaust gas emissions. The scientific literature highlights that all the emission control systems require proper operating temperatures and an accurate flow control to guarantee reliable and effective processes. In particular, to assure the suitable thermal level for efficient treatments, the addition of supplemental fuel is often necessary, with a not negligible penalty on the global engine efficiency. To reduce this effect, innovative reversed flow converters have been proposed over the past few years. They are based on the cyclic inversion of the exhaust gas between the two system ends (active flow control). Conversely, unidirectional flow within the aftertreatment system represents the technical solution largely adopted in practice (passive flow control).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 6725

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: