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2015-11-04
Event
High Efficiency Combustion Systems With the increased demands for fuel efficiency and fuel economy, the internal combustion engine (ICE) continues to be examined for design enhancements to improve these measures. Overall, the program will examine several technological advances required to maximize efficiency, including: o Advanced, low-temperature combustion techniques o Improved understanding and modeling of heat loss mechanisms o Electrification and intelligent control of accessory loads o Possible redesign of mechanical systems (e.g., variable stroke for fully expanded cycles) o High-efficiency turbo-machinery to extract exhaust energy and provide boost Emissions Reduction With a greater than 10 percent growth expected in the domestic passenger vehicle market, China now has the world’s largest auto market; and emissions from transportation are growing rapidly as well.
2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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2015-11-04
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The ability to quickly and accurately model vapour cycle systems is of increasing interest to a diverse range of industrial applications where energy is lost in the form of ‘waste heat’ from a combustion process. This is especially the case for the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), which has long been associated with Combined Heat & Power (CHP) plants and small-scale power generation due to its ability to recover heat from relatively low grade engery sources such as biomass, geothermal and solar. However, vehicle manufacturers are also realising the opportunity of recovering some of the 60-70% of fuel energy that is normally lost to the surroundings. Indeed ORC systems are particularly well suited to recovering heat from the vehicle’s exhaust, or liquid cooling system. The recovered energy is used to heat the working fluid to a superheated vapour which is then expanded using either a turbine or a postive displacement machine to extract useful work.
Training / Education
On-board diagnosis of engine and transmission systems has been mandated by government regulation for light and medium vehicles since the 1996 model year. The regulations specify many of the detailed features that on-board diagnostics must exhibit. In addition, the penalties for not meeting the requirements or providing in-field remedies can be very expensive. This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how and why OBD systems function and the technical features that a diagnostic should have in order to ensure compliant and successful implementation.
Training / Education
Stringent requirements of reduced NOx emission limits in the US have presented engineers and technical staff with numerous challenges. Several in-cylinder technical solutions have been developed for diesel engines to meet 2010 emission standards. These technologies have been optimized and have yielded impressive engine-out results in their ability to reduce emissions to extremely low levels. However, current and state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions have fallen short of achieving the limits imposed on diesel emissions for 2010.
2015-10-06
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-06
Event
This session discusses technologies that treat engine exhaust emissions to meet commercial vehicle requirements. The scope covers developments in catalysts, materials, controls, and integration with the complete engine/vehicle system.
Training / Education
As diesel emissions regulations have become more and more stringent, diesel particulate filters (DPF) have become possibly the most important and complex diesel aftertreatment device. This seminar covers many DPF-related topics using fundamentals from various branches of applied sciences such as porous media, filtration and materials sciences and will provide the student with both a theoretical as well as an applications-oriented approach to enhance the design and reliability of aftertreatment platforms.
2015-09-22
Event
This session is dedicated to topics related to aircraft emissions affecting local air quality and climate change. In addition, papers dealing with FAA/EASA or airport emissions regulations may also be presented.
Training / Education
The September offering of this seminar is held in conjunction with the SAE 2015 On-Board Diagnostics Symposium. Register for this offering and you can register to attend the SAE 2015 On-Board Diagnostics Symposium for 25% off the classic member event rate. Please contact our Customer Service department at +1.877.606.7323 (U.S. and Canada only) or +1.724.776.4970 (outside U.S. and Canada) to register for SAE 2015 On-Board Diagnostics Symposium at this special rate. On-board diagnostics, required by governmental regulations, provide a means for reducing harmful pollutants into the environment.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2506
Paolo Iodice, Adolfo Senatore
Nowadays, due to catalyst improvements and electronic mixture control of last generation vehicles equipped with internal combustion engine, the most significant part of the total emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons takes place during the cold phase, if compared with those exhausted in hot conditions, with a clear consequence on air quality of urban contexts. The purpose of this research, developed by the Department of Industrial Engineering of the University of Naples Federico II with reference to an European background, is a deeper analysis of the engine and after-treatment system behaviour within the cold start transient and the evaluation of cold start additional emissions: a methodology was developed and optimized to evaluate the cold transient duration, the emitted quantities during the cold phase and the relevant time-dependence function.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2514
Marco Piumetti, Samir Bensaid, Nunzio Russo
A set of nanostructured CeO2-based catalysts with different topological and textural properties (CeO2-nanocubes, CeO2-nanocubes over ZSM-5-type zeolite, CeO2-nanorods, mesoporous CeO2 and CeO2-SCS) has been prepared to investigate the shape-dependency activity of ceria towards soot combustion under different reaction. The physico-chemical properties of the prepared materials have been studied using complementary techniques. The best performances, in terms of the total oxidation of soot, have been achieved for the CeO2-nanocubes, due to the abundance of coordinative unsaturated atomic sites on the exposed surfaces. However, better results, in terms of the onset of soot oxidation, have been obtained for high-surface-area materials, thus reflecting the key role of surface area at low temperatures. Activity tests have suggested the surface-sensitivity of soot oxidation over the prepared ceria-based materials, when the reaction temperature was above 410 °C or 370 °C.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2521
José Ramón Serrano, Pedro Piqueras, Emanuele Angiolini, Cesare Meano, Joaquín De La Morena
The abatement of nitrogen oxides emissions is a topic of major concern for automotive manufacturers. In addition to aftertreatment solutions such as LNT or SCR devices, the use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is necessary in most of the applications to meet emissions regulations. Due to the high specific humidity of the exhaust gases, a high condensate flow may be generated if EGR gases are significantly cooled down. In the case of long-route EGR (LR-EGR) usage, this condensate flow would reach the compressor wheel. This paper explores the variables governing the condensation process and the potential effects of the liquid droplets and streams on the compressor wheel durability combining experimental and theoretical approach. For this purpose, visualization of both the condensate flow and the compressor wheel are performed. Tests are conducted in a flow test rig in which LR-EGR water content is reproduced by water injection on the hot air mass flow.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2531
Marco Leonetti, Michael Bargende, Martin Kreschel, Christoph Meier, Horst Schulze
Due to the demands for today’s passenger cars regarding fuel consumption and emissions, exhaust turbo charging has become a fundamental step in achieving these goals. Especially in upper and middle class vehicles it is also necessary to consider the noise comfort. Today, floating bushings are mainly used as radial bearings in turbochargers. In the conventional operating range of the turbocharger dynamic instability occurs in the lubrication films of the bearings. This instability is transferred by structure-borne noise into audible airborne sound and known as constant tone phenomenon. This phenomenon is not the major contributor of the engine noise but its tonal character is very unpleasant. In order to gain a more detailed understanding about the origin of this phenomenon, displacement sensors have been applied to the compressor- and the turbine-side of the rotor, to be able to determine the displacement path.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2501
Thomas Laible, Stefan Pischinger, Bastian Holderbaum
Today’s and future stringent emission limits require the use of exhaust gas aftertreatment technologies. In terms of legislation, the emissions at low engine load and at the cold start increasingly gain attention. At the Institute for Internal Combustion Engines RWTH Aachen University, different measures for rising the temperature concerning exhaust gas aftertreatment components on both the passenger car and the industrial / commercial vehicle engine. The proposed study of the passenger car diesel engine has shown the potential of internal and external heating measures. The configuration consisting of NSC and DPF, illustrates the potential of electrically heated NSC, including solutions on how the emission limit for EU6 can be achieved.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2508
Joschka Schaub, Thorsten Schnorbus, Thomas Koerfer, Stefan Pischinger
Model-based control strategies along with an adapted calibration process become more important in the overall vehicle development process. The main drivers for this development trend are an increasing number of vehicle variants and more complex engine hardware, which is required to fulfill the more and more stringent emission legislation and fuel consumption targets. Upcoming fundamental changes in the homologation process with EU 6C covering an extended range of different ambient conditions are suspected to intensify this trend. One main cause for the increased calibration effort is the use of various aftertreatment technologies amongst different vehicle applications requiring numerous combustion modes. The different combustion modes range from heating modes for active Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration or early SCR light-off and rich combustion modes to purge the NOx storage catalyst (NSC) to partially premixed normal combustion modes.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2504
Gerben Doornbos, Emma Adams, Per-Anders Carlsson, Daniel Dahl, Mats Laurell, Håkan Schyllander, Par Gabrielsson, Milica Folic, Ingemar Denbratt, Magnus Skoglundh
Commercial three way catalysts have limited capacity towards reducing NOx in the presence of excessive oxygen. This prevents lean-burn combustion concepts from meeting legislative emission standards. A solution towards decreasing NOx emissions in the presence of excess air is the use of a passive-SCR system. Under rich conditions ammonia is formed over an ammonia formation catalyst, the ammonia is stored in the SCR and in its turn reacts with the NOx under lean engine conditions. Here up-scaled Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 catalysts as well as a commercially Pd-Rh based three-way catalyst (TWC) are evaluated using both engine and further lab-scale tests. The purpose of these tests is to compare the ammonia production for the various catalysts under various lambda values and temperatures by means of engine and lab scale tests. The Pd/Al2O3 showed little sensitivity to temperature both under engine and lab scale experiments.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2448
Mengqin Shen, Vilhelm Malmborg, Yann Gallo, Bjorn B. O. Waldheim, Patrik Nilsson, Axel Eriksson, Joakim Pagels, Oivind Andersson, Bengt Johansson
The conventional diesel combustion offers high thermal efficiencies along with elevated emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is one of the possible ways that help to reduce NOx emissions but can generally result in higher engine-out soot emissions. To better understand the knowledge about particle formation and emission, an insight in the cylinder is necessary. In this work, characteristics of soot particles from in-cylinder gas in a heavy duty engine for low temperature combustion (LTC) compared with conventional combustion were investigated. By using a fast gas sampling valve, gas samples from the cylinder were taken as a function of crank angle and analyzed regarding the black carbon mass, soot particle size distribution and particle numbers. Black carbon mass was measured with an aethalometer and the particle size distribution and particle number were measured by a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Three levels of EGR were applied.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2389
Mirko Baratta, Roberto Finesso, Daniela Misul, Ezio Spessa
The potential of internal EGR (iEGR) and external EGR (eEGR) in reducing the engine-out NOx emissions in a heavy-duty diesel engine has been investigated by means of a refined 1D fluid-dynamic engine model developed in the GT-Power environment. The engine is equipped with Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) and Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) systems. The activity was carried out in the frame of the CORE (CO2 Reduction for Long Distance Transport) Collaborative Project of the European Community, VII FP. The engine model integrates an innovative 0D predictive combustion model for the simulation of the HRR (heat release rate), which is based on the accumulated fuel mass approach, and a multi-zone thermodynamic model for the simulation of the in-cylinder temperatures. NOx emissions are calculated by means of the Zeldovich thermal and prompt mechanisms.
Training / Education
Meeting the requirements of heavy-duty engine emissions regulations is a challenge for all engine manufacturers. Since the introduction of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) in medium and heavy-duty diesel engines, these systems have become more sophisticated and tightly integrated with emission control systems. This 2-day seminar will explore the advantages and disadvantages of EGR and the most effective implementation of various EGR systems. This seminar will begin by defining EGR and why it is used in diesel engines, along with an explanation of the mechanisms by which EGR is able to reduce NOx.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 6396

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