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Training / Education
2015-03-25
On-board diagnosis of engine and transmission systems has been mandated by government regulation for light and medium vehicles since the 1996 model year. The regulations specify many of the detailed features that on-board diagnostics must exhibit. In addition, the penalties for not meeting the requirements or providing in-field remedies can be very expensive. This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of how and why OBD systems function and the technical features that a diagnostic should have in order to ensure compliant and successful implementation. Fundamental design objectives and features needed to achieve those objectives for generic on-board diagnostics will be covered. The course will also include a review of the California Air Resources OBD II regulation, providing students with a firm foundation for reading and understanding the requirements, including the in-use rate portion of the regulations and how to properly calculate and output the required rate information.
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
The proposed legislative requirements on particle number emissions for EU6c and the reduced particle mass emission limits of CARB LEV-III / EPA Tier-3 pose a new challenge in the development of gasoline direct injection engines. Bosch is actively pursuing system level solutions, including the development of next generation DI injection systems, to aid OEMs in meeting the new legislative requirements without the need for additional exhaust gas after-treatment or penalties in fuel economy. This presentation will highlight key development areas and show system level pathways to successfully address these challenges.
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2014-12-09
New rounds of stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions reduction regulations in Europe (Euro 6c) and North America (CARB LEV III, EPA Tier 3) are driving the optimization of existing diesel exhaust aftertreatment systems. Urea - Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems are among the de-NOx technologies that have been successfully introduced in recent years. The new regulations are bringing a closer look to SCR de-NOx performance particularly during the cold start phase of the existing emissions certification cycles. This presentation will review some of the options under consideration to address cold start NOx emissions. Some of these approaches impose new and more severe requirements on the urea injection function – these are also reviewed as well as the response to these requirements by the injection system designers.
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
The Tier-III and LEV-III fleet emission rollout is reviewed with the federal fuel economy standards. An emission rollout is generated compliant to the light duty LEV-III emission regulations to 2025. PGM loadings are estimated for the fleet based on current 4 cylinder Bin-4 and PZEV applications. Pd and Rh loadings will increase as the fleet average approaches SULEV30 in 2025. Non-traditional technologies such as HC trap and SCR catalyst may find a market.
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2014-12-09
Pd based catalysts has not been considered sufficient for converting methane to carbon dioxide for lean-CNG applications mainly in terms of durability, which finally impact the performance on long period. In the present investigation, we were addressed the substantial improvement of Pd-based catalyst with respect to its durability and initial activity. To obtain this, primarily the improvement was mainly achieved based on the new insight on the deactivation routes of Pd-based catalysts under normal operating condition of lean-CNG engines using various physicochemical tools. In addition, optimal engine control logic was carried in second stage of catalysts development by keeping the catalyst more durable. The system, comprised of improved Pd-based catalyst and engine control logic, has demonstrated the capability of complying EURO-6 regulations.
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2014-12-09
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2014-12-09
Recent legislation has been enacted requiring unprecedented reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, and thus improved fuel efficiency, from internal combustion engines. The aggressive rate of improvement in fuel consumption mandated by this legislation has resulted in the proposal of more exotic combustion strategies than have previously been considered for serial production. The new combustion strategies that are being considered for near term applications can result in substantially different operating environments and thus the required performance of the emission control system. To deliver the most efficient engine system for each application, the impact of the combustion strategy on emission control system requirements must be taken into account when selecting the combustion strategy for production to ensure the benefits of the combustion strategy are not offset by penalties associated with treating exhaust emissions. This discussion will present data on the impact of novel combustion strategies on the operating environment for the emissions control system.
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2014-12-09
One of the most important aspects of meeting emission standards is catalyst robustness. Emissions must be met at high mileage, termed “full useful life”, which is 150,000 mi for light and medium duty vehicles under Tier3/LEV3. Catalyst durability is application and system specific. Full useful life aging and correlations to accelerated aging schemes typically include both hydrothermal exposure and chemical poisoning. Robustness tests are designed to exceed the limits of a particular catalyst or filter material and test to failure. New aging schemes and robustness tests are needed when new technologies such as cold start traps for HC and NOx, gasoline particle filters, and SCR coated filters are incorporated into conventional three-way and diesel exhaust systems. This presentation will include a summary of recent emission certifications and publications by various vehicle manufacturers, aging and robustness testing of conventional exhaust systems, as well as a look into the durability of future emission control technologies.
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2014-12-09
The automotive industry is facing a combination of challenges over the next decade. Fuel economy regulations are increasing for light-duty vehicles, and U.S. EPA Tier 3 emissions standards are requiring lower tailpipe emissions. Advanced combustion techniques are being pursued to enable improved fuel economy, and lower NOx and PM emissions can be obtained by the more homogeneous combustion from these techniques. However, CO and HC emissions are often higher from advanced combustion engines, and the higher efficiency of these engines results in lower exhaust temperatures. The combination of higher CO and HC emissions with lower exhaust temperatures challenges conventional oxidation catalysts. Thus, new catalyst technologies are being pursued to lower light-off temperatures to enable emissions compliance. Research on novel catalyst formulations for control of CO and HC emissions will be presented.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session pertain to studies of exhaust emission control and the emission effects from fuels, engine controls, engine design, combuston quality, catalytic converters, diesel particulate filters, and other aftertreatment. The focus of the session is on reducing emissions and meeting international emission standards.
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