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2016-04-14 ...
  • April 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
As diesel emissions regulations have become more and more stringent, diesel particulate filters (DPF) have become possibly the most important and complex diesel aftertreatment device. This seminar covers many DPF-related topics using fundamentals from various branches of applied sciences such as porous media, filtration and materials sciences and will provide the student with both a theoretical as well as an applications-oriented approach to enhance the design and reliability of aftertreatment platforms.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0921
Ashok Kumar, Kristopher Ingram, Deepesh Goyal, Krishna Kamasamudram
Vanadia based Selective Catalytic Reduction (V-SCR) catalysts are widely used to meet NOx emissions over off-road diesel engines in North America and both on-road and off-road diesel engines in Europe and rest of the markets. Even though Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts offer higher NOx conversion as compared to V-SCR at lower temperatures, sulfur poisoning of Cu-zeolite leads to a significant decrease in NOx conversion and desulfation (deSOx) temperatures in excess of 500C are needed to restore its performance. Wide-spread application of V-SCR is found in off-road applications due to their resistance to poisoning by sulfur that eliminates the need for periodic thermal management (TM) for deSOx. Several applications with V-SCR catalysts operate below 300C in conditions that are conducive to carbonaceous deposits formation due to the presence of unburned HCs in the exhaust gas.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0929
Devin Aryan, Kenneth Price, Thomas Pauly
There is growing interest in application of SCR on DPF (SDPF) for light and heavy duty applications, particularly to provide improvements in cold start emissions, as well as improvements in system cost and packaging. The first of systems containing SDPF are just coming to market, with additional introductions expected, particularly for light duty applications. To provide real world testing for the new SDPF technology prior to the availability of production vehicles configured for SDPF, an SDPF and one SCR catalyst were substituted in place of the original two SCR catalysts and a CDPF on a Ford F250 HD pickup. A reference aged set of components was first run on chassis dynamometer cycles in configuration DOC+SDPF+SCR and DOC+SCR+SDPF, as well as DOC+SDPF. The DOC+SCR+SDPF was chosen for the road aging as the best match to the original system NOx performance and control compatibility.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0940
Sam George, Achim Heibel
Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have become a standard aftertreatment component for a majority of current on-road/non-road diesel engines used in the US and Europe. The upcoming Stage V emissions regulations in Europe for non-road engines will make DPFs a standard component for emissions reductions of those engines. The tightening in NOx emissions standard has resulted in the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for NOx reduction and as a result the general trend in engine technology as of today is towards a higher engine-out NOx/PM ratio enabling passive regeneration of the DPF. The novel filter concept discussed in this paper is optimized for low pressure drop, high filtration efficiency, and low thermal mass for optimized regeneration and fast heat-up, therefore reducing CO₂ implications for the DPF operation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0194
Yici Li, Wei Tian
There are several exhaust after-treatment processes for the flameproof diesel engine, one of which is smog dilution equipment of air jet that was employed several years ago, whereas the application confine of the equipment is shrank gradually because of the purification effect. Based on the smog dilution equipment of air jet at present, a novel equipment called a dry cooling equipment is presented whose structure is redesigned, analyzed and optimized. The intrinsic relationship is proposed through the interpretation of key factors including throat dimension, baffle and extend plate of guide.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0954
Jason Jacques, Thomas Pauly, Michael Zammit, Homayoun Ahari, Michael Smith
Significant reduction in Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions will be required to meet LEV III Emissions Standards for Light Duty Diesel passenger vehicles (LDD). As such, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are exploring all possible aftertreatment options to find the best balance between performance, robustness and cost. The primary technology adopted by OEMs in North America to achieve low NOx levels is Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst. The critical parameters needed for SCR to work properly are: an appropriate reductant such as ammonia (NH3) provided as urea, optimum operating temperatures, and optimum Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) to NOx ratios (NO2/NOx). The NO2/NOx ratio is mostly influenced by Precious Group Metals (PGM) containing catalysts upstream of the SCR catalyst. Different versions of zeolite based SCR technologies are available on the market today and these vary in their active metal type (iron, copper, vanadia), and/or zeolite type.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1004
Somendra Pratap Singh, Shikhar Asthana, Shubham Singhal, Naveen Kumar
The energy crisis coupled with depleting fuel reserves and rising emission levels has encouraged research in the fields of performance and emission enhancement technologies and engineering designs. The present paper aims primarily to offset the problem of high emissions and low efficiency in low cost CI engines used as temporary power solutions on a large scale. The investigation relates to the low cost optimization of an intake runner having the ability to vary the swirl ratio within the runner. The test runs conducted for the intake revealed an increase in efficiency at the cost of increased NOx and CO2 (for some configurations) and at the same time, the UHC and CO emissions were considerably decreased. However, in a relative analysis, no configuration was able to simultaneously reduce all emission parameters and thus, there exists a necessity to find an optimized configuration as a negotiation between the improved and deteriorated parameters.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1003
Fabian Fricke, Om Parkash Bhardwaj, Bastian Holderbaum, Terrence Scofield, Elmar Grußmann, Marco Kollmeier
The improvements in the internal combustion engines’ efficiency has led to a reduction of exhaust temperatures. The simultaneous tightening of exhaust emission limits requires ever more complex emission control methods, whose efficiency is crucially dependent upon the exhaust gas temperature. In the last five years the exhaust gas temperature upstream the oxidation catalyst has been reduced by an average of almost 20 °C; thus making emission reduction increasingly difficult. The application of a 2-layer fabricated sheet metal integrated manifold - turbine housing module offers a significant potential of emission reduction and fuel economy improvement in modern EU 6 diesel engines. Double-walled exhaust manifold and turbine housing modules made from sheet metal have been used in gasoline engines since 2009. They offer the potential in modern diesel engines to reduce both emission of pollutants and fuel consumption.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0948
Davion O. Clark, Thomas Pauly
Control of N2O emissions is a significant challenge for manufacturers of HDD On Road engines and vehicles due to requirements for NOx control and Green House Gas (GHG) Phases 1&2 requirements. OEMs continually strive to improve BSFE which often results in increased engine out NOx (EO NOx) emissions. NOx control required to meet the stringent tail pipe NOx targets at these higher EO NOx levels forces OEM implementation of aggressive UREA/NH3 dosing algorithms resulting in increased N2O emissions over traditional SCR and SCR+ASC catalysts systems. This study explores methods to improve NOx conversion while reducing the SCR contribution of N2O across the exhaust after treatment systems. For example, combinations of two traditional SCR catalysts, one Fe based and another Cu based, can be utilized at various proportions by volume to optimize their SCR efficiency while minimizing the N2O emissions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0995
Michael A. Robinson, Jacob Backhaus, Ryan Foley, Z. Gerald Liu
Introduction of modern diesel aftertreatment, primarily selective catalytic reduction (SCR) designed to reduced NOx, has increased the presence of urea decomposition byproducts, mainly ammonia, in the aftertreatment system. This increase in ammonia has been shown to lead to particle formation in the aftertreatment system. In this study, a 32.5% urea water solution (UWS) based state of the art SCR system was investigated in order to determine the influence of UWS dosing on solid particle count. Post diesel particulate filter (DPF) particle count (> 23 nm) is shown to increase by over 400% during the World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC) due to UWS dosing. This increase in tailpipe particle count warranted a detailed parametric study of UWS dosing parameters effect on tailpipe particle count. Global ammonia to NOx ratio, UWS droplet residence time, and SCR catalyst inlet temperature were found to be significant factors in post-DPF UWS based particle formation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0953
Homayoun Ahari, Michael Smith, Michael Zammit, Brad walker
In order to meet LEV III, EURO 6C and Beijing 6 emission levels, OEMs can potentially implement unique after treatment systems solutions which meet the varying legislated requirements. The availability of various wash coat substrates and PGM loading and ratio options, make selection of an optimum catalyst system challenging, time consuming and costly. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) methodologies have been used in industry since 1990s. One of the earliest applications was at Motorola where the methodology was applied to the design and production of pagers which Consumer Reports called “virtually defect-proof”.1 Since then, the methodology has evolved to not only encapsulate complicated variation optimization but also design optimization where multiple factors are in play. In this study, attempts are made to adapt the DFSS concept and methodology to identify and optimize a catalyst for diesel applications.
2016-03-14 ...
  • March 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • August 15-16, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Rosemont, Illinois
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Stringent requirements of reduced NOx emission limits in the US have presented engineers and technical staff with numerous challenges. Several in-cylinder technical solutions have been developed for diesel engines to meet 2010 emission standards. These technologies have been optimized and have yielded impressive engine-out results in their ability to reduce emissions to extremely low levels. However, current and state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions have fallen short of achieving the limits imposed on diesel emissions for 2010.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0023
Pravesh Chandra Shukla, Tarun Gupta, Avinash Kumar Agarwal
Abstract Diesel particulates are mainly composed of elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) with traces of metals, sulfates and ash content. Organic fraction of the particulate are considered responsible for its carcinogenic effects. Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) is an important after-treatment device for reduction of organic fraction of particulates. In this study, two non-noble metal based DOCs (with different configurations) were prepared and evaluated for their performance. Lanthanum based perovskite (LaMnO3) catalyst was used for the preparation of DOCs. One of the DOC was coated with support material ceria (5%, w/w), while the other was coated without any support material. Prepared DOCs were retrofitted in a four cylinder water cooled diesel engine. Various emission parameters such as particulate mass, particle number-size distribution, regulated and unregulated emissions, EC/OC etc., were measured and compared with the raw exhaust gas emissions from the prepared DOCs.
2015-10-08
Event
This session discusses technologies that treat engine exhaust emissions to meet commercial vehicle requirements. The scope covers developments in catalysts, materials, controls, and integration with the complete engine/vehicle system.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2904
Z. Gerald Liu, Nathan Ottinger, Christopher Cremeens, Annamarie Murray, Dana McGuffin
Abstract U.S. and European nonroad diesel emissions regulations have led to the implementation of various exhaust aftertreatment solutions. One approved configuration, a vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction catalyst followed by an ammonia oxidation catalyst (V-SCR + AMOX), does not require the use of a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) or diesel particulate filter (DPF). While certification testing has shown the V-SCR + AMOX system to be capable of meeting the nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter requirements, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of this aftertreatment for volatile and nonvolatile organic emissions removal, especially since the removal of this class of compounds is generally attributed to both the DOC and DPF.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2794
Meng-Huang Lu, Figen Lacin, Daniel McAninch, Frank Yang
Abstract Diesel exhaust after treatment solutions using injection, such as urea-based SCR and lean NOx trap systems, effectively reduce the emission NOx level in various light vehicles, commercial vehicles, and industrial applications. The performance of the injector is crucial for successfully utilizing this type of technology, and a simulation tool plays an important role in the virtual design, that the performance of the injector is evaluated to reach the optimized design. The virtual test methodology using CFD to capture the fluid dynamics of the injector internal flow has been previously developed and validated for quantifying the dosing rate of the test injector. In this study, the capability of the virtual test methodology was extended to determine the spray angle of the test injector, and the effect of the manufacturing process on the injector internal nozzle flow characteristics was investigated using the enhanced virtual test methodology.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2441
Robert Morgan, Andrew Banks, Andrew Auld, Morgan Heikal, Christopher lenartowicz
Abstract Diesel fuel injection pressures have increased steadily on heavy duty engines over the last twenty years and pressures as high as 300MPa are now possible. This was driven by the need to control toxic exhaust emissions, in particular particulate emissions using advanced in-cylinder combustion strategies. With the introduction of efficient aftertreatment systems for both particulate and NOx emissions control there is less demand for in-cylinder emissions control especially considering the drive for improved fuel economy. In this paper we consider the benefit of high fuel injection pressure for a number of emissions control strategies with different balances of in-cylinder and exhaust aftertreatment emissions control. A test program was undertaken on a single cylinder heavy duty research engine installed at the University of Brighton, in collaboration with Ricardo.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-1813
Alexandre Bouet, Hyun Woo Won, Virginie Morel, Maria Thirouard, Loic De Francqueville, Ludovic Noel
Recent work has demonstrated the potential of gasoline-like fuels to reduce NOX and particulates emissions when used in diesel engines. Indeed, fuels highly resistant to auto-ignition provide more time for fuel and air mixing prior to the combustion and therefore a more homogeneous combustion. Nevertheless, major issues still need to be addressed, particularly regarding UHC and CO emissions at low load and particulate/noise combustion trade-off at high load. The purpose of this study is to investigate how an existing modern diesel engine could be operated with low-cetane fuels and define the most appropriate Cetane Number (CN) to reduce engine-out emissions. With this regard, a selection of naphtha and gasoline blends, ranging from CN30/RON 57 to CN35/RON 41 was investigated on a Euro 5, 1.6L four-cylinder engine. Results were compared to the conventional diesel running mode using a minimum NOX level oriented calibration, both in steady state and transient conditions.
2015-09-01
Technical Paper
2015-01-2021
Gen Shibata, Masaki Takahara, Keito Nishikawa, Hideyuki Ogawa
To reduce NOx emissions from diesel engines, the urea-SCR (selective catalytic reduction) system has been introduced commercially. In urea-SCR, the freezing point of the urea aqueous solution, the deoxidizer, is −11°C, and the handling of the deoxidizer under cold weather conditions is a problem. Further, the ammonia escape from the catalyst and the generation of N2O emissions are also problems. To overcome these disadvantages of the urea-SCR system, the addition of a hydrocarbon deoxidizer has attracted attention. In this paper, a micro-reactor SCR system was developed and attached to the exhaust pipe of a single cylinder diesel engine. With the micro-reactor, the catalyst temperature, quantity of deoxidizer, and the space velocity can be controlled, and it is possible to use it with gas and liquid phase deoxidizers. The catalyst used in the tests reported here is Ag(1wt%)-γAl2O3.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0914
Ehsan Tootoonchi, Gerald Micklow
Abstract Understanding the physics and chemistry involved in diesel combustion, with its transient effects and the inhomogeneity of spray combustion is quite challenging. Great insight into the physics of the problem can be obtained when an in-cylinder computational analysis is used in conjunction with either an experimental program or through published experimental data. The main area to be investigated to obtain good combustion begins with the fuel injection process and the mean diameter of the fuel particle, injection pressure, drag coefficient, rate shaping etc. must be defined correctly. The increased NOx production and reduced power output found in engines running biodiesel in comparison to petrodiesel is believed to be related to the different fuel characteristics in comparison to petroleum based diesel. The fuel spray for biodiesel penetrates farther into the cylinder with a smaller cone angle. Also the fuel properties between biodiesel and petrodiesel are markedly different.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1019
Changpu Zhao, Man Bai, Junwei Yang, Fang Shang, Gang Yu
Abstract The main objective of this paper was to investigate the pressure drop characteristics of ACT (asymmetric cell technology) design filter with various inlet mass flow rates, soot loads and ash loads by utilizing 1-D computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The model was established by AVL Boost code. Different ratios of inlet to outlet channel width inside the DPF (Diesel Particulate Filter) were investigated to determine the optimal structure in practical applications, as well as the effect of soot and ash interaction on pressure loss. The results proved that pressure drop sensitivity of different inlet/outlet channel width ratios increases with the increased inlet mass flow rate and soot load. The pressure drop increases with the increased channel width ratio at the same mass flow rate. When there is little soot deposits inside DPF, the pressure drop increases with the bigger inlet.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1021
Brad Adelman, Navtej Singh, Paul Charintranond, Greg Griffin, Shyam Santhanam, Ed Derybowski, Adam Lack
Abstract Current legislative trends regarding diesel emissions are striving to achieve two seemingly competing goals: simultaneously lowering NOx and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. These two goals are considered at odds since lower GHG emissions (e.g. CO2) is achieved via high combustion efficiency that result in higher engine out NOx emissions and lower exhaust gas temperatures [1, 2]. Conversely, NOx reduction technologies such as SCR require temperatures above 200°C for dosing the reductant (DEF) [3, 4, 5] as well as for high conversion efficiencies [1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9]. Dosing DEF requires injection pressures around 5 bar to ensure proper penetration into the exhaust stream as well as generate the appropriate spray pattern and droplet sizes. Dosing DEF generally requires long mixing and/or high turbulence (high restriction) areas so that the aqueous urea solution can be converted into gaseous NH3 without deposit formation [8, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15].
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1044
Kiran C. Premchand, Krishnan Raghavan, John H. Johnson
Abstract Numerical models of aftertreatment devices are increasingly becoming indispensable tools in the development of aftertreatment systems that enable modern diesel engines to comply with exhaust emissions regulations while minimizing the cost and development time involved. Such a numerical model was developed at Michigan Technological University (MTU) [1] and demonstrated to be able to simulate the experimental data [2] in predicting the characteristic pressure drop and PM mass retained during passive oxidation [3] and active regeneration [4] of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CPF) on a Cummins ISL engine. One of the critical aspects of a calibrated numerical model is its usability - in other words, how useful is the model in predicting the pressure drop and the PM mass retained in another particulate filter on a different engine without the need for extensive recalibration.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1010
Hongsuk Kim, Hoyeol Lee, Sunyoup Lee, Gyubaek Cho
Diesel burners have been used to regenerate diesel particulate filters (DPF) because of their simplicity in engine torque control and less oil dilution by fuel compared with the commonly used in-cylinder post fuel injection method. We previously developed a novel diesel burner using rotating plasma as an ignition source and found it to be effective in DPF regeneration. Here, we carry out in-depth studies on combustion efficiency of this plasma-ignited diesel burner and investigate the effects of influential factors such as plasma power, the amount of fresh air supplied, and O2 concentration in the exhaust gas on combustion characteristics of the burner. The obtained results show that fresh air supplied to the burner plays an important role in ignition and the early stage of combustion, and O2 concentration in the exhaust gas is identified as the most dominant factor for combustion efficiency.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1028
Paul Gaynor, Benjamin Reid, Graham Hargrave, Thomas Lockyer, Jonathan Wilson
Abstract In recent years urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has become the principal method of NOx abatement within heavy duty (HD) diesel exhaust systems; however, with upcoming applications demanding NOx reduction efficiencies of above 96 % on engines producing upwards of 10 g·kWh−1 NOx, future diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) dosing systems will be required to operate stably at significantly increased dosing rates. Developing a dosing system capable of meeting the increased performance requirements demands an improved understanding of how DEF sprays interact with changing exhaust flows. This study has investigated four production systems representing a diverse range of dosing strategies in order to determine how performance is influenced by spray structure and identify promising strategies for further development. The construction of an optically accessible hot-air flow rig has enabled visualisation of DEF injection into flows representative of HD diesel exhaust conditions.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0998
Paul Mentink, Rob van den Nieuwenhof, Frank Kupper, Frank Willems, Dennis Kooijman
Abstract Heavy-duty diesel engines are used in different application areas, like long-haul, city distribution, dump truck and building and construction industry. For these wide variety of areas, the engine performance needs to comply with the real-world legislation limits and should simultaneously have a low fuel consumption and good drivability. Meeting these requirements takes substantial development and calibration effort, where an optimal fuel consumption for each application is not always met in practice. TNO's Integrated Emission Management (IEM) strategy, is able to deal with these variations in operating conditions, while meeting legislation limits and obtaining on-line cost optimization. Based on the actual state of the engine and aftertreatment, optimal air-path setpoints are computed, which balances EGR and SCR usage.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1060
Yangdongfang Yang, Gyubaek Cho, Christopher Rutland
Abstract The SCR Filter simultaneously reduces NOx and Particle Matter (PM) in the exhaust and is considered an effective way to meet emission regulations. By combining the function of a Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) and a Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR), the SCR Filter reduces the complexity and cost of aftertreatment systems in diesel vehicles. Moreover, it provides an effective reaction surface and potentially reduces backpressure by combining two devices into one. However, unlike traditional flow through type SCR, the deNOx reactions in the SCR Filter can be affected by the particulate filtration and regeneration process. Additionally, soot oxidation can be affected by the deNOx process. A 1-D kinetic model for integrated DPF and NH3-SCR system over Cu-zeolite catalysts was developed and validated with experimental data in previous work[1].
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1013
Shankar Ramadas, Sunil Prasanth Suseelan, Thiyagarajan Paramadhayalan, Ambalavanan Annamalai, Rahul Mital
Abstract Emission compliance at the production level has been a challenge for vehicle manufacturers. Diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) plays a very important role in controlling the emissions for the diesel vehicles. Vehicle manufacturers tend to ‘over design’ the diesel oxidation catalyst to ‘absorb’ the production variations which seems an easier and faster solution. However this approach increases the DOC cost phenomenally which impacts the overall vehicle cost. The main objective of this paper is to address the high variation in CO tail pipe emissions which were observed on a diesel passenger car during development. This variation was posing a challenge in consistently meeting the internal product requirement/specification.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1033
Raymond Conway, Sougato Chatterjee, Mojghan Naseri, Ceren Aydin
Abstract Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. Typical 2013 Heavy Duty Diesel emission control systems include a DOC upstream of a catalyzed soot filter (CSF) which is followed by urea injection and the SCR sub-assembly. There is a strong desire to further increase the NOx conversion capability of such systems, which would enable additional fuel economy savings by allowing engines to be calibrated to higher engine-out NOx levels. One potential approach is to replace the CSF with a diesel particulate filter coated with SCR catalysts (SCRF® technology, hereafter referred to as SCR-DPF) while keeping the flow-through SCR elements downstream, which essentially increases the SCR volume in the after-treatment assembly without affecting the overall packaging.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0997
Jonas Jansson, Åsa Johansson, Hanna Sjovall, Mikael Larsson, Gudmund Smedler, Colin Newman, Jason Pless
Abstract This paper will review several different emission control systems for heavy duty diesel (HDD) applications aimed at future legislations. The focus will be on the (DOC+CSF+SCR+ASC) configuration. As of today, various SCR technologies are used on commercial vehicles around the globe. Moving beyond EuroVI/US10 emission levels, both fuel consumption savings and higher catalyst system efficiency are required. Therefore, significant system optimization has to be considered. Examples of this include: catalyst development, optimized thermal management, advanced urea dosing calibrations, and optimized SCR inlet NO:NO2 ratios. The aim of this paper is to provide a thorough system screening using a range of advanced SCR technologies, where the pros and cons from a system perspective will be discussed. Further optimization of selected systems will also be reviewed. The results suggest that current legislation requirements can be met for all SCR catalysts under investigation.
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