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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2203
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0088
Tervin Tan, Jin Seo Park, Patrick Leteinturier
The constant motivation for lower fuel consumption and emission levels has always been in the minds of most auto makers. With legislation playing a huge part in order to protect the environment. For instances, based on ICCT reports, EU passenger cars, weighing 1500kg, for today (2015) would need to meet the CO2 emission of 130g/km. This target is reduced to 95g/km in 2020. For the Chinese market, according to their CAFC target for passenger cars of 2015, has to meet the 6.9L/100km fuel consumption which translates to 163gCO2/km. At 2020, this target has been further reduced to 5L/100 which translate to 120gCO2/km. Though this is less than that of EU’s, the trend of fuel consumption and emission reduction is obvious and legislation needs to be met. Gasoline Port fuel injection has been a matured system for many years and cars sold in emerging markets still favor such system due to its less system complexity and cost.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1007
Benjamin Ellies, Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
As part of its technology assessment for the upcoming midterm evaluation of the 2017-2025 LD vehicle GHG emissions regulation, EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its ALPHA model, a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation tool. One of the most efficient engines today, a 2.0L Mazda SkyActiv engine, is of particular interest due to its high geometric compression ratio and use of an Atkinson combustion cycle. EPA benchmarked the 2.0L SkyActiv at its National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions laboratory. EPA then incorporated ALPHA into an engine dynamometer control system so that vehicle chassis testing could be simulated with a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) approach.
2016-01-22
Event
Designing sustainable, compliant vehicles is becoming more challenging as vehicle manufacturers use new materials, while still complying with a patchwork of requirements in different states. With recent state initiatives focusing on green chemistry, copper in brake pads, and ‘Prop65’ warning labels, this session will examine these state requirements that will change how article manufacturers, like automakers, must design compliant products. In particular, it will focus on opportunities to explore solutions unique to the automotive industry.
2016-01-22
Event
At the federal and state level, a mix of policies and regulations were developed with the objective of improving the environmental performance of the fleet. This moderated panel will explore the effects, interactions, and unintended consequences of the mix of existing and proposed regulations and policies including CAFE, ZEV, LCFS, and various GHG regulations. A panel of technology and policy experts will discuss technical and socio-economic merits and potential drawbacks, and the effect that they have on vehicle design, technology mix, and evolution of the automotive fleet.
2016-01-21
Event
This session will include an opportunity to hear the views from a range of stakeholders on the types of technologies and policy options which can improve fuel efficiency and reduce GHG emissions from the heavy and medium duty transportation sector. This will include discussion on Phase 2 regulations, views from manufacturers (OEMs and suppliers), users, and other stakeholders on various other topics that may include, a look at HDT efficiency beyond just the truck/engine- but in how/where the truck operates, CAFE compliance, emissions tampering, speed limiting mandates, etc.
2016-01-21
Event
With evolving federal TSCA reform legislation, the automotive industry is now faced with potential changes in how EPA will regulate new and existing materials, chemicals and substances, in a time when vehicles are likewise evolving to meet aggressive emissions standards, self-driving vehicle safety requirements, and consumer demands. This session will examine how the federal government is expanding its role in regulating the materials used in current and future vehicles, and how article manufacturers, like automakers, are affected by TSCA reform. Attendance to this session is essential for those needing to understand how TSCA reform and EPA initiatives may impact import/export requirements, significant new use rule (SNUR) requirements, ongoing use requirements, and the supply chain. This session will provide the tools to continue to successfully produce and sell compliant vehicles for the US market.
2016-01-21
Event
A quiet revolution is unfolding under the hoods of “conventional” passenger cars and light trucks, with a host of innovative technologies aiming to boost fuel economy and reduce vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The “Midterm Evaluation” of model year 2022-2025 CAFE and GHG standards is prompting renewed looks by both regulatory agencies and industry at the costs, effectiveness, and consumer acceptance of these technologies. Similarly, important third-party assessments are being conducted by groups such as the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). This session examines the state of light duty vehicle technologies expected to play a role in the standards through 2025. Government and industry leaders will discuss opportunities and challenges facing the light duty sector, along with the latest research informing the agencies’ Midterm Evaluation process.
2016-01-21
Event
The automotive industry is entering a period of profound change, much of it driven by environmental regulations. The U.S. government’s 2025 greenhouse gas and fuel economy regulations, aggressive greenhouse gas reduction goals at the state-level and international standards are all shaping the cars we drive today, and those we will drive in the future. What does it all mean, and where are we going? These plenary panels will explore these important issues from numerous perspectives. What vehicle technologies will automakers use to answer today’s environmental and regulatory challenges? What are the costs? Are consumers ready, willing and able to embrace the technological changes to vehicles that will be required to achieve these goals? What are the proper roles for industry, federal and state governments? Do regulations like CAFE requirements and zero-emission vehicle mandates drive change?
2016-01-21
Event
The automotive industry is entering a period of profound change, much of it driven by environmental regulations. The U.S. government’s 2025 greenhouse gas and fuel economy regulations, aggressive greenhouse gas reduction goals at the state-level and international standards are all shaping the cars we drive today, and those we will drive in the future. What does it all mean, and where are we going? These plenary panels will explore these important issues from numerous perspectives. What vehicle technologies will automakers use to answer today’s environmental and regulatory challenges? What are the costs? Are consumers ready, willing and able to embrace the technological changes to vehicles that will be required to achieve these goals? What are the proper roles for industry, federal and state governments? Do regulations like CAFE requirements and zero-emission vehicle mandates drive change?
2015-11-24
WIP Standard
AMS1424/2
This specification covers a deicing/anti-icing material in the form of a non-glycol fluid.
2015-11-24
WIP Standard
AMS1424/1
This specification covers a deicing/anti-icing material in the form of a glycol fluid
2015-11-17
Technical Paper
2015-32-0824
Marcus Bonifer, Rainer Kiemel
In Europe the next level of emission regulations for motorcycles, Euro IV, is on the verge of introduction, followed by Euro V around 2021. Together with the new emission regulations, the ECE R 40 testing cycle will become obsolete and the more realistic World Motorcycle Testing Cycle (WMTC) will be introduced. Current catalytic solutions for gasoline engines consist of so-called three way catalysts (TWC) that are able to reduce the emissions of CO, NOx and hydrocarbons (HC) below the regulatory emission limit. These catalysts mostly contain platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh) in different concentrations and ratios. Another important component is the so-called oxygen storage material (OSC) which compensates for the fluctuations in lambda during acceleration and deceleration. Currently existing catalyst formulations must be modified to fulfil the more stringent emission limits with simultaneous consideration of a more realistic test cycle.
2015-11-05
Standard
J1939/3_201511
SAE J1939-03 provides requirements and guidelines for the implementation of On Board Diagnostics (OBD) on heavy duty vehicles (HDV) using the SAE J1939 family of standards. The guidelines identify where the necessary information to meet OBD regulations may be found among the SAE J1939 document set. Key requirements are identified here to insure the interoperability of OBD scan tools across individual OBD compliant vehicles. Market-defined regulations permit the use of SAE J1939 to meet OBD requirements. Implementers are cautioned to obtain and review the specific regulations for the markets where their products are sold. This document is focused on guidelines and requirements to satisfy the State of California Air Resources Board (ARB), the authors of 13 CCR 1971.1, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Euro IV and V requirements from European Commission directives, and UN/ECE WP 29 GRPE WWH OBD Global Technical Regulation (GTR).
2015-10-22
WIP Standard
AS6286/6
This document outlines permissible fluid application areas for Deicing and Anti-icing fluids, no-spray/no-direct fluid application areas, and other cautionary areas/items by aircraft type. The diagrams and cautions are generic representations of the aircraft types specified, and apply to all series/variants unless indicated otherwise. In conjunction with the main document and other related slash sheets it will provide guidelines for the proper procedures to deice and anti-ice aircraft on the ground information to support this training program is provided to make the material a better tool for the preparation and execution of the training & qualification. It is intended to provide a common basis for de-icing/anti-icing training and qualification for de- icing providers and airlines. This material was compiled using various international documents with support from SAE documents and individually contributed editorial comments.
2015-10-22
WIP Standard
AS6286/4
This document covers the standards of de-icing/anti-icing of aircraft on the ground. In conjunction with the main document and other related slash sheets it will provide guidelines for the proper procedures to deice and anti-ice aircraft on the ground information to support this training program is provided to make the material a better tool for the preparation and execution of the training & qualification. It is intended to provide a common basis for de-icing/anti-icing training and qualification for de- icing providers and airlines. This material was compiled using various international documents with support from SAE documents and individually contributed editorial comments. Its purpose is to serve as a “Globalized Deicing Training Manual”.
2015-10-22
WIP Standard
AS6286/5
In conjunction with the main document and other related slash sheets this document will provide guidelines for the proper procedures to deice and anti-ice aircraft on the ground information to support this training program is provided to make the material a better tool for the preparation and execution of the training & qualification. It is intended to provide a common basis for de-icing/anti-icing training and qualification for de- icing providers and airlines. This material was compiled using various international documents with support from SAE documents and individually contributed editorial comments. Its purpose is to serve as a “Globalized Deicing Training Manual”.
2015-10-22
WIP Standard
AS6286/1
The document is intended to promote and develop safe practices, effective procedures and improved technology related to training of aircraft ground operations in winter conditions to ensure the highest possible levels of safety for passengers, flight crew and ground personnel. It can be utilized to develop a set of commonly agreed training practices and procedures for the de-icing/anti- icing of aircraft on the ground reflecting current industry best practice. It shall ensure continued compliance with all relevant standards and regulatory requirements, and shall ensure that it continues to reflect current industry best practice.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2203

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