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2016-05-05
Standard
AMS1424/2
The foundation specification (AMS1424M) and the detail specifications (AMS1424/1 and AMS1424/2) cover deicing/anti-icing materials in the form of a fluid.
2016-04-19
Video
Of all the technology trends discussed at last week's SAE World Congress, one trend is clear: The automotive industry cannot meet global CO2 regulations without vehicle electrification. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at the need for an increasing number of hybrid and full battery powered vehicles. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering.
2016-04-08
Magazine
Software's role continues to expand Design teams use different technologies to create new software and link systems together. Emissions regulations and engine complexity With the European Commission announcing a Stage V criteria emissions regulation for off-highway, scheduled to phase-in as earlly as 2019, there will be an end to a brief era of harmonized new-vehicle regulations. Will this affect an already complex engine development process? Evaluating thermal design of construction vehicles CFD simulation is used to evaluate two critical areas that address challenging thermal issues: electronic control units and hot air recirculation.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-1165
Mahmoud Abdelhamid, Imtiaz Haque, Srikanth Pilla, Zoran S. Filipi, Rajendra Singh
Abstract The challenge of meeting the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards of 2025 has led to major developments in the transportation sector, among which is the attempt to utilize clean energy sources. To date, use of solar energy as an auxiliary source of on-board fuel has not been extensively investigated. This paper is the first study at undertaking a comprehensive analysis of using solar energy on-board by means of photovoltaic (PV) technologies to enhance automotive fuel economies, extend driving ranges, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and ensure better economic value of internal combustion engine (ICE) -based vehicles to meet CAFE standards though 2025. This paper details and compares various aspects of hybrid solar electric vehicles with conventional ICE vehicles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0981
Susan Collet
Abstract Light Duty Vehicle corporate average fuel economy (CAFE), fuel economy label, and greenhouse gas (GHG) requirements are related but are very different. The fundamentals to obtain the data are the same, but to derive the required values, the final formulas have different components. These formulas, how to obtain the values which comprise the formulas, and how to use the test output to obtain the final result necessary to determine compliance with the standards are in regulations, but are not easily located. The information is contained in many documents; such as various sections in the Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance documents, SAE International papers, American Society of Testing and Materials standards, and law suit judgments. This paper compiles the fundamentals of vehicle CAFE, fuel economy label, and GHG information. The intent is to provide a reference to the foundation of these requirements.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0904
Michael Martin, Arno Eichberger, Eranda Dragoti-Cela
Abstract A worldwide decrease of legal limits for CO2 emissions and fuel economy led to stronger efforts for achieving the required reductions. The task is to evaluate technologies for CO2 reduction and to define a combination of such measures to ensure the targets. The challenge therefor is to find the optimal combination with respect to minimal costs. Individual vehicles as well as the whole fleet have to be considered in the cost analysis - which raises the complexity. Hereby, the focus of this work is the consideration and improvement of a new model series against the background of a fleet and the selection of measures. The ratio between the costs and the effect of the measures can be different for the each vehicle configuration. Also, the determination of targets depends whether a fleet or an individual vehicle is selected and has impact on the selection and optimization process of those measures.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0088
Tervin Tan, Jin Seo Park, Patrick Leteinturier
Abstract The constant motivation for lower fuel consumption and emission levels has always been in the minds of most auto makers. Therefore, it is important to have precise control of the fuel being delivered into the engine. Gasoline Port fuel injection has been a matured system for many years and cars sold in emerging markets still favor such system due to its less system complexity and cost. This paper will explain injection control strategy of today during development, and especially the injector dead-time compensation strategy in detail and how further improvements could still be made. The injector current profile behavior will be discussed, and with the use of minimum hardware electronics, this paper will show the way for a new compensation strategy to be adopted.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0687
Weiyong Tang, Bob Chen, Kevin Hallstrom, Ansgar Wille
Nowadays the Chinese legislative development and the implementation of advanced technologies to curb HDD emissions have been a subject of worldwide attention. Currently China is warping its efforts to deploy and enforce the launch of nationwide Stage IV and is also preparing for the setup and implementation of future regulation standards. Focus discussion here is on the aftertreatment pathways to meet China current and future emissions standards, based on market uniqueness. This paper seeks to provide retrospectives of the adoption of V-SCR on China stage IV HDD vehicles, through presenting findings from two separate postmortem analyses of field returned catalyst parts and also through comparative study with local catalyst products. The paper also discusses the challenges and possible solutions meeting the WHTC requirement for Stage IV and V city vehicles.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1007
Benjamin Ellies, Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
Abstract As part of its technology assessment for the upcoming midterm evaluation (MTE) of the 2022-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas (LD GHG) emissions standards, EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its Advanced Light-Duty Powertrain and Hybrid Analysis (ALPHA) model, a physics-based, forward-looking, full vehicle computer simulation tool. One of the most efficient engines today, a 2.0L Mazda SkyActiv engine, is of particular interest due to its high geometric compression ratio and use of an Atkinson cycle. EPA benchmarked the 2.0L SkyActiv at its National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions laboratory. EPA then incorporated ALPHA into an engine dynamometer control system so that vehicle chassis testing could be simulated with a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) approach.
2016-03-03
Standard
J2683_201603
This SAE Standard applies to Carbon Dioxide R-744 refrigerant used to service motor vehicle passenger air-conditioning (A/C) systems designed to use CO2 (R-744). Hermetically sealed, refrigerated cargo systems are not covered by this document.
2016-02-18
Video
Hybrid cars are starting to lose their "niche" status. And as trends continue, they'll likely become mainstream. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at the future of hybrid vehicles. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering at: http://www.sae.org/magazines/podcasts.
2016-01-22
Event
At the federal and state level, a mix of policies and regulations were developed with the objective of improving the environmental performance of the fleet. This moderated panel will explore the effects, interactions, and unintended consequences of the mix of existing and proposed regulations and policies including CAFE, ZEV, LCFS, and various GHG regulations. A panel of technology and policy experts will discuss technical and socio-economic merits and potential drawbacks, and the effect that they have on vehicle design, technology mix, and evolution of the automotive fleet.
2016-01-22
Event
Designing sustainable, compliant vehicles is becoming more challenging as vehicle manufacturers use new materials, while still complying with a patchwork of requirements in different states. With recent state initiatives focusing on green chemistry, copper in brake pads, and ‘Prop65’ warning labels, this session will examine these state requirements that will change how article manufacturers, like automakers, must design compliant products. In particular, it will focus on opportunities to explore solutions unique to the automotive industry.
2016-01-21
Event
This session will include an opportunity to hear the views from a range of stakeholders on the types of technologies and policy options which can improve fuel efficiency and reduce GHG emissions from the heavy and medium duty transportation sector. This will include discussion on Phase 2 regulations, views from manufacturers (OEMs and suppliers), users, and other stakeholders on various other topics that may include, a look at HDT efficiency beyond just the truck/engine- but in how/where the truck operates, CAFE compliance, emissions tampering, speed limiting mandates, etc.
2016-01-21
Event
With evolving federal TSCA reform legislation, the automotive industry is now faced with potential changes in how EPA will regulate new and existing materials, chemicals and substances, in a time when vehicles are likewise evolving to meet aggressive emissions standards, self-driving vehicle safety requirements, and consumer demands. This session will examine how the federal government is expanding its role in regulating the materials used in current and future vehicles, and how article manufacturers, like automakers, are affected by TSCA reform. Attendance to this session is essential for those needing to understand how TSCA reform and EPA initiatives may impact import/export requirements, significant new use rule (SNUR) requirements, ongoing use requirements, and the supply chain. This session will provide the tools to continue to successfully produce and sell compliant vehicles for the US market.
2016-01-21
Event
A quiet revolution is unfolding under the hoods of “conventional” passenger cars and light trucks, with a host of innovative technologies aiming to boost fuel economy and reduce vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The “Midterm Evaluation” of model year 2022-2025 CAFE and GHG standards is prompting renewed looks by both regulatory agencies and industry at the costs, effectiveness, and consumer acceptance of these technologies. Similarly, important third-party assessments are being conducted by groups such as the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). This session examines the state of light duty vehicle technologies expected to play a role in the standards through 2025. Government and industry leaders will discuss opportunities and challenges facing the light duty sector, along with the latest research informing the agencies’ Midterm Evaluation process.
2016-01-21
Event
The automotive industry is entering a period of profound change, much of it driven by environmental regulations. The U.S. government’s 2025 greenhouse gas and fuel economy regulations, aggressive greenhouse gas reduction goals at the state-level and international standards are all shaping the cars we drive today, and those we will drive in the future. What does it all mean, and where are we going? These plenary panels will explore these important issues from numerous perspectives. What vehicle technologies will automakers use to answer today’s environmental and regulatory challenges? What are the costs? Are consumers ready, willing and able to embrace the technological changes to vehicles that will be required to achieve these goals? What are the proper roles for industry, federal and state governments? Do regulations like CAFE requirements and zero-emission vehicle mandates drive change?
2016-01-21
Event
The automotive industry is entering a period of profound change, much of it driven by environmental regulations. The U.S. government’s 2025 greenhouse gas and fuel economy regulations, aggressive greenhouse gas reduction goals at the state-level and international standards are all shaping the cars we drive today, and those we will drive in the future. What does it all mean, and where are we going? These plenary panels will explore these important issues from numerous perspectives. What vehicle technologies will automakers use to answer today’s environmental and regulatory challenges? What are the costs? Are consumers ready, willing and able to embrace the technological changes to vehicles that will be required to achieve these goals? What are the proper roles for industry, federal and state governments? Do regulations like CAFE requirements and zero-emission vehicle mandates drive change?
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2208

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