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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2222
2016-10-04
Event
Topic Include: Polymers, Coatings, and Surface Technologies Standards and Regulations Environmental Compliance Life Cycle Analysis Green/Sustainable Applications
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2144
Galina M. Susova, Rostislav Sirotkin
FMEA methodology is widely used today for solution of practical analysis problems, quality (reliability, risks) evaluation and assurance etc., owing to a clear and simple algorithm and the absence of restrictions on a subject of analysis (i.e., systems, processes, products). However, the efficiency of applying FMEA methodology for problems solution is determined by the choice of elements of analysis, completeness of identification of potential non-conformities, their causes, frequencies and effects. Quality of manufacture is determined by deviations from requirements of design and manufacturing documentation including drawings. In this article a task of ensuring a steady reduction of deviations from these requirements during manufacture through implementation of preventive actions combined with control of time and costs for correction of non-conformances is considered.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2143
Yury Zhuk
The EU REACH regulations set September 2017 as a “sunset date” for the use of toxic Hexavalent Chromium salts, and as this date is approaching the aerospace manufacturers are looking for alternative coatings to replace Hard Chrome plating (HCP). HCP is widely used in the aircraft industry to protect steel components against wear, corrosion and galling. Hardide-A CVD Tungsten/Tungsten Carbide coating has met the technical performance requirements as a potential alternative to HCP on some specific Airbus aircraft components. This newly-developed CVD coating is crystallized from the gas phase atom-by-atom, forming a uniform layer on both internal and external surfaces and complex shaped parts, which are impossible to coat by thermal spray coatings, considered to be the best available alternative to HCP. Hardide coating consists of Tungsten Carbide nano-particles dispersed in metal Tungsten matrix, combining hardness with toughness and crack-resistance.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8014
David A. Schaller, Michael D. Roeth
Abstract This report provides an overview of recent technical solution adoption rates by fleets from detailed fleet surveys. Manufacturers’ contributions in terms of technology development, cost reduction, durability and refinement will also be discussed. OEM vehicle integration and product line offerings (standard, optional, and post-production upfits) are shared. All of this background will set the stage for a review of the proposed Greenhouse Gas Phase 2 regulations, the technologies expected to be utilized to meet the targets, and the hurdles the industry must successfully clear for profitable fleet use in commercial vehicle freight transportation. Fuel efficiency has always been important to fleets and as fuel costs have risen, a plethora of fuel efficient technologies have emerged. The industry also cares about sustainability and emissions reductions and now Greenhouse Gas regulations exist to further encourage development, integration and adoption of such technologies.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8124
Xinyu Ge, Hua Gu, Ying Wang
China has become the world’s largest vehicle market in terms of sales volume. Automobiles sales keep growing in recent years despite the declining economic growth rate. Due to the increasing attention given to the environmental impact, more stringent emission regulations are being drafted to control traditional internal combustion engine emissions. In order to reduce vehicle emissions, environmentally-friendly new-energy vehicles, such as electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid vehicles, are being promoted by government policies. The Chinese government plans to boost sales of new-energy cars to account for about five percent of China’s total vehicle sales. It is well known that more electric and electronic components will be integrated into a vehicle platform during vehicle electrification.
2016-09-01
Magazine
Solving the Greenhouse Gas puzzle While automakers and policymakers debate the TAR, engineers and product planners prepare for the steep climb to meet GHG and CAFE rules beyond 2022. Revving up thermal characterization in the component lab The latest generation of high-speed infrared cameras can capture airbag deployments and other fast-moving actions quickly and accurately. C3 consortium aims for soot solution A newly formed group of companies led by CFD specialists Convergent Science targets exhaust particulate reduction in the combustion chamber. Inside the autonomous vehicle With less focus on driver needs, comfort, safety, and occupant productivity will become key. Editorial: Bad gas?
2016-08-10
WIP Standard
AIR6211A
This test method provides stakeholders (runway deicing chemical manufacturers, deicing/anti-icing chemical operators and airport authorities) with a relative ice penetration capacity of runway deicing/anti-icing chemicals, by measuring the ice penetration as a function of time. Such runway deicing/anti-icing chemicals are often also used on taxiways and other paved areas. This test method does not quantitatively measure the theoretical or extended time of ice penetration capability of ready-to-use runway deicing/anti-icing chemicals in liquid or solid form.
2016-08-10
WIP Standard
AIR6170A
This test method provides stakeholders (runway deicing chemical manufacturers, deicing/anti-icing chemical operators and airport authorities) with relative ice melting capacity of runway deicing chemicals, by measuring the amount of ice melted as a function of time. Such runway deicing chemicals are often also used on taxiways. This test method does not quantitatively measure the theoretical or extended time ice melting capability of ready-to-use runway deicing/anti-icing chemicals in liquid or solid form.
2016-08-10
WIP Standard
AIR6172A
This test method provides stakeholders (runway deicing chemical manufacturers, deicing/anti-icing chemical operators and airport authorities) with relative ice undercutting capacity of runway deicing chemicals, by measuring the area of ice undercut pattern as a function of time. Such runway deicing chemicals are often also used on taxiways.
2016-08-04
Magazine
Special report: Lightweighting Uncovering the next actions in the industry's grand mass-reduction campaign. CAE's next leap forward With 3D simulations skyrocketing, engineers are looking forward to highly-optimized toolsets to keep pace with complexity. SAE Convergence 2016 Preview Meet the disruptors, network with peers and learn about the latest tech solutions that are rapidly changing the auto industry. "Military-grade" aluminum Jaguar, Exa say simulation to eliminate prototypes by 2020 OEMs expand testing of FEV variable-compression ratio engine Growth of FCVs and EVs tied to infrastructure Bolt EV seat design cuts weight, delights tall passengers Rolls-Royce reveals a Vision of its future Volvo bets on new PowerPulse, not 48V, to attack turbodiesel 'lag' SEAT to spearhead VW's new platform and 48V technology Dr. Jay Baron of CAR discusses vehicle lightweighting and predicts the outcome of the crucial CAFE mid-term review.
2016-07-12
WIP Standard
AMS1428/2
The foundation specification (AMS1428) and the category specifications (AMS1428/1 and AMS1428/2) cover deicing/anti- icing materials in the form of a fluid. 1.1.1 Foundation and Category Specifications The foundation specification establishes the requirements for all Type I deicing/anti-icing fluids and defines the terms Glycol (Conventional and Non-Conventional) and Non-Glycol and contains technical and other requirements that apply to both Glycol (Conventional and Non-Conventional) and Non-Glycol based fluids. The category specification AMS1428/1 covers Glycol (Conventional and Non-Conventional) based fluids whereas the category specification AMS1428/2 covers Non-Glycol based fluids. 1.2 Other Scope Requirements Other Scope requirements are set in AMS1428.
2016-07-12
WIP Standard
AMS1428/1
1.1 Form The foundation specification (AMS1424M) and the category specifications (AMS1424/1 and AMS1424/2) cover deicing/anti-icing materials in the form of a fluid. 1.1.1 Foundation and Category Specifications The foundation specification establishes the requirements for all Type I deicing/anti-icing fluids and defines the terms Glycol (Conventional and Non-Conventional) and Non-Glycol and contains technical and other requirements that apply to both Glycol (Conventional and Non-Conventional) and Non-Glycol based fluids. The category specification AMS1424/1 covers Glycol (Conventional and Non-Conventional) based fluids whereas the category specification AMS1424/2 covers Non-Glycol based fluids. 1.2 Other Scope Requirements Other Scope requirements are set in AMS1424M.
2016-06-03
Magazine
Executive viewpoints Industry leaders offer their insights on the state of the heavy-duty on- and off-highway industries in this annual series of opinion pieces. The executives share their views on the most pressing technologies and trends shaping their business and the industry moving forward. Annual Product Guide Top products from throughout the industry covering technologies such as Powertrain & Energy, Hydraulics, Electronics, and Testing & Simulation.
2016-05-19
WIP Standard
AS1426C
This specification is intended to be used as a general standard for industry use for design and construction of air transport galley equipment and inflight food service systems.
2016-05-18
WIP Standard
AMS1424/3
This detail specification AMS1424/3 covers the use of In-Truck Manufacturing of a deicing SAE Type I deicing/anti-icing fluid. This detailed specification contains technical and other requirements that apply for the In-Truck Manufacturing of Type I deicing/anti-icing fluid.
2016-05-09
WIP Standard
ARP4902C
This document provides information and guidance material to assist in assessing the need for and feasibility of developing deicing facilities, the planning (size and location) and design of deicing facilities, and assessing environmental considerations and operational considerations associated with de-icing facilities. The document presents relevant information necessary to define the need for a deicing facility and factors influencing its size, location and operation. The determination of the need for deicing facilities rests with Airports. Although this document intends to provide information to airport operator and deicing facility planner/designer, all stakeholders, including deicing service providers, should be involved in the development process.
2016-04-19
Video
Of all the technology trends discussed at last week's SAE World Congress, one trend is clear: The automotive industry cannot meet global CO2 regulations without vehicle electrification. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at the need for an increasing number of hybrid and full battery powered vehicles. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering.
2016-04-08
Magazine
Software's role continues to expand Design teams use different technologies to create new software and link systems together. Emissions regulations and engine complexity With the European Commission announcing a Stage V criteria emissions regulation for off-highway, scheduled to phase-in as earlly as 2019, there will be an end to a brief era of harmonized new-vehicle regulations. Will this affect an already complex engine development process? Evaluating thermal design of construction vehicles CFD simulation is used to evaluate two critical areas that address challenging thermal issues: electronic control units and hot air recirculation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0904
Michael Martin, Arno Eichberger, Eranda Dragoti-Cela
Abstract A worldwide decrease of legal limits for CO2 emissions and fuel economy led to stronger efforts for achieving the required reductions. The task is to evaluate technologies for CO2 reduction and to define a combination of such measures to ensure the targets. The challenge therefor is to find the optimal combination with respect to minimal costs. Individual vehicles as well as the whole fleet have to be considered in the cost analysis - which raises the complexity. Hereby, the focus of this work is the consideration and improvement of a new model series against the background of a fleet and the selection of measures. The ratio between the costs and the effect of the measures can be different for the each vehicle configuration. Also, the determination of targets depends whether a fleet or an individual vehicle is selected and has impact on the selection and optimization process of those measures.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0981
Susan Collet
Abstract Light Duty Vehicle corporate average fuel economy (CAFE), fuel economy label, and greenhouse gas (GHG) requirements are related but are very different. The fundamentals to obtain the data are the same, but to derive the required values, the final formulas have different components. These formulas, how to obtain the values which comprise the formulas, and how to use the test output to obtain the final result necessary to determine compliance with the standards are in regulations, but are not easily located. The information is contained in many documents; such as various sections in the Code of Federal Regulations, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance documents, SAE International papers, American Society of Testing and Materials standards, and law suit judgments. This paper compiles the fundamentals of vehicle CAFE, fuel economy label, and GHG information. The intent is to provide a reference to the foundation of these requirements.
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