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Training / Education
2015-06-15
Liquid fuel atomization and spray formation is the heart of the majority of stationary and mobile power generation machines that we rely on. This seminar focuses on the process of liquid atomization and spray formation and how it relates to fuel injection systems and emission of pollutants in modern engines. The seminar begins with background coverage of terminology, the purposes of liquid atomization and spray formation, and different designs of atomizers and nozzles employed in various industries. The focus is then directed to gasoline and diesel fuel injections, injector designs, and performance requirements for optimum engine operation with lowest possible emission of harmful pollutants. Based on the idea that knowledge of technical practices and advances in one area (i.e. diesel fuel injection) is beneficial to engineers in other areas (gasoline direct injection, rocket engines), this seminar takes an interdisciplinary approach. Attendees will understand the technology and logic behind different injector designs, and gain the knowledge to judge, adapt and transfer technology advances from one discipline to another.
Training / Education
2015-06-03
Fuel composition has had to change with the advent of more stringent emission regulations. Reformulated gasoline (RFG), for example, is vastly different from gasoline of even ten years ago. Tightening regulations on diesel emissions will dramatically change both diesel fuel and engine design. This three-day seminar will review the fundamentals of motor fuels, combustion and motor power generation. The primary content of the course provides a basic introduction to the technology, performance, evaluation, and specifications of current gasoline, diesel, and turbine fuels. The first day of the course begins with a brief review of the evolution of motor fuel through 100 years of performance and specification.
Event
2015-03-23
Training / Education
2015-02-10
The path to commercialization of plug-in hybrids is likely to require complex interactions between OEMs, battery manufacturers, electric utilities, and government, yet the plug-in hybrid is a still-developing technology. How do plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) differ from conventional hybrids? What are the advantages and challenges for vehicle manufacturers, public utilities, energy and environmental concerns, and end-users? What is the current state of plug-in hybrid development? Those unfamiliar with PHEV or vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology, yet whose job will be impacted by plug-in hybrid vehicles in the future, will benefit from this two-hour web seminar.
Training / Education
2014-12-03
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%. This web seminar will explore turbocharging for gasoline and diesel (heavy and light duty) engines, including the fundamentals of turbocharging, design features, performance measures, and matching and selection criteria. It will discuss the interaction between turbocharging and engine systems and the impact on performance, fuel economy and emissions. Developments in turbocharging technology such as variable geometry mechanisms, two-stage and sequential (series & parallel) turbocharging, EGR including low pressure loop, high pressure loop and mixed mode systems and novel turbocharging systems will be described using figures and data.
Event
2014-11-25
Event
2014-11-20
This session contains a variety of presentations regarding engine oil technologies developed for small engines. There are three papers addressing new lubricants for motorcycles ranging from increasing engine power, to new high performance oils needed to meet the every increasing demand of new low emission engines. There are also two papers to address reducing friction and wear required for energy conserving performance in small engines.
Event
2014-11-19
This session invites paper focused on aspects of operating small engines on non-petroleum based fuels or non-conventional blends of fuels. This includes performance metrics such as power, efficiency and emissions. It also covers durability considerations including materials compatibility, wear rates, etc.
Event
2014-11-19
This session invites paper focused on aspects of operating small engines on non-petroleum based fuels or non-conventional blends of fuels. This includes performance metrics such as power, efficiency and emissions. It also covers durability considerations including materials compatibility, wear rates, etc.
Event
2014-11-19
This session invites paper focused on aspects of operating small engines on non-petroleum based fuels or non-conventional blends of fuels. This includes performance metrics such as power, efficiency and emissions. It also covers durability considerations including materials compatibility, wear rates, etc.
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
The internal combustion engine will continue to be integral to the transportation of people and goods for the foreseeable future. To reduce environmental impact and improve energy security, many nations are enacting new aggressive fuel economy and emissions standards which are pushing the development of new engine technologies on an unprecedented scale. These new technologies coupled with advances in sensors and onboard computers will enable real-world implementations of new combustion concepts as well as new fuel pathways that blend the best characteristics of spark-ignition and compress-ignition engines for maximum efficiency with lowest possible emissions. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several ongoing activities exploring the intersection of fuel chemistry and advanced combustion processes including reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion, gasoline partially premixed combustion (PPC), and the use of in-cylinder thermo-chemical reforming (TCR) to compensate fuel-specific differences on the combustion process.
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
With the increased demands for fuel efficiency and fuel economy, the internal combustion engine (ICE) continues to be examined for design improvements to improve these measures. It is projected that OEMs and suppliers will continue to optimize the ICE at least through 2020. Focusing on the near- and long-term role of the ICE in advanced vehicles and highlighting this accelerating development and calibration; high efficiency combustion and controls; advances in turbo machinery, valve technology or ignition systems; and emission control challenges. Overall, the program may examine several technological advances required to maximize efficiency, including: • Advanced, low-temperature combustion techniques • Improved understanding and modeling of heat loss mechanisms • Electrification and intelligent control of accessory loads • Possible redesign of mechanical systems (e.g., variable stroke for fully expanded cycles) • High-efficiency turbo-machinery to extract exhaust energy and provide boost Emissions, Monitoring, Measurement, Control and Energy Savings Strategies for the Future.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 21048

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