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2016-05-18 ...
  • May 18-20, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Fuel composition has had to change with the advent of more stringent emission regulations. Reformulated gasoline (RFG), for example, is vastly different from gasoline of even ten years ago. Tightening regulations on diesel emissions will dramatically change both diesel fuel and engine design. This three-day seminar will review the fundamentals of motor fuels, combustion and motor power generation. The primary content of the course provides a basic introduction to the technology, performance, evaluation, and specifications of current gasoline, diesel, and turbine fuels.
2016-04-14 ...
  • April 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • October 18-19, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Developing vehicles that achieve optimum fuel economy and acceleration performance is critical to the success of any automotive company, yet many practicing engineers have not received formal training on the broad range of factors which influence vehicle performance. This seminar provides this fundamental understanding through the development of mathematical models that describe the relevant physics and through the hands-on application of automotive test equipment. Attendees will also be introduced to software used to predict vehicle performance.
2015-12-09 ...
  • December 9-11, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 30-December 2, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2015-11-24
Event
2015-10-27
Event
2015-10-06
Event
Topics include the effects of traditional and alternative fuels, and additives on deposit formation, intake system cleanliness, friction, wear, corrosion, and elastomer compatibility. Also covered are effects of fuel specification on drivability, on evaporative emissions, and on the relationship between emissions and drive cycle. In addition, this session covers the analysis, design, testing, and manufacturing techniques and methodologies of all fuel injection systems and their components.
2015-10-06
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-06
Event
The focus of this session is on the latest advances in manufacturing strategies, design and materials selection strategies to promote lighter weight, higher performing, fuel efficient vehicles without sacrificing safety or performance. Presentations will address the latest breakthroughs in materials and cutting-edge technology applications. Special emphasis will be on tangible, cost-effective strategies in lightweighting.
2015-10-04
Event
This session will debate the interference in the development of Motorsport brake systems and brake systems or High Performance Road cars. The question will be discused whether Motorsport is a valid test field for High Performance road cars, and what synergies can be found between thess two areas.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2771
Kevin A. Newman, Paul Dekraker, Houshun Zhang, James Sanchez, Prashanth Gururaja
In designing a regulatory vehicle simulation program for determining greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel consumption, it is necessary to estimate the performance of technologies, verify compliance with the regulatory standards, and estimate the overall benefits of the program. The agencies developed the Greenhouse Gas Emissions Model (GEM) to serve these purposes. GEM is currently being used to certify the fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of the Phase 1 rulemaking for all heavy-duty vehicles except pickups and vans, which require a chassis dyno test for certification. While the version of the GEM used in Phase 1 contains most of the technical and mathematical features needed to run a vehicle simulation, the model lacks sophistication. For example, Phase 1 GEM only models manual transmissions and it does not include engine torque interruption during gear shifting.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2808
Philip Zoldak, Jeffrey Naber
In recent years, natural gas has been considered a replacement for diesel fuel in large bore engines, due to its low cost, high heating value and widespread availability. Stoichiometric premixed spark-ignition (SI), defined as port-fuel injection (PFI) of natural gas (NG) followed by SI close to top dead center (TDC), has traditionally been used as the main fuel delivery and combustion method for light and medium duty engines. However, premixed SI of NG results in inefficiencies in the intake process and combustion that is knock limited as boost and load are increased. Traditionally, high knock is addressed by spark timing retard. Spark timing retard can lead to misfires and low brake mean effective pressures. Thus premixed SI has limited low load use in heavy duty where compression ignition of diesel fuel remains dominant.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2811
Tingjun Hu, Ho Teng, Xuwei Luo, Chun Lu, Jiankun Luo
When highly boosted, turbocharged gasoline direct injection (TGDI) engines can have torque curves comparable to those of light-duty (LD) diesel engines. Hence, applications of TGDI engines have been considered to be extended from passenger cars to LD vehicles, such as Ford F150 and E150. Most modern TGDI engines employ homogeneous mixture combustion with an injection pressure  150 bar typically. Under this combustion mode, two challenges having to be faced in the engine development are: 1) fuel dilution of the crankcase oil due to interactions of fuel sprays with the cylinder wall as a result of spray impingement on the cylinder wall or on the piston top when the fuel demand is high or fuel condensation during the warmup phase; 2) low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) at high loads and low speeds, which often leads to a severe knock combustion known as the super knock. It is widely believed that LSPI is triggered by self ignition of oil particles entered the engine cylinder.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2813
Philip Zoldak, Jeffrey Naber
The increased availability of natural gas (NG) in the United States (US) and its relatively low cost compared to diesel fuel has heightened interest in the conversion of medium duty (MD) and heavy duty (HD) engines to NG fueled combustion systems. The aim is to realize fuel cost savings and reduce harmful emissions, while maintaining durability. This is a potential path to help the US reduce dependence on crude oil. Traditionally, port-fuel injection (PFI) or premixed NG spark-ignited (SI) combustion systems have been used for MD and HD engines with widespread use in the US and Europe; however, this technology exhibits poor cycle efficiency and is load limited due to knock phenomenon. Direct Injection of NG during the compression stroke promises to deliver improved thermal efficiency by avoiding excessive premixing and extending the lean limits which helps to extend the knock limit.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2885
Nicholas Schaut, Raja Sengupta
As part of the United States Department of Energy’s SuperTruck program, Volvo Trucks and its partners were tasked with demonstrating 50% improvement in overall freight efficiency for a tractor-trailer, relative to a best in class 2009 model year truck. This necessitated that significant gains be made in reducing aerodynamic drag of the tractor-trailer system, so trailer side skirts and a trailer boat tail were employed. A Lattice-Boltzmann based simulation method was used in conjunction with a Kriging Response Surface optimization process in order to efficiently describe a design space of seven independent parameters relating to boat tail and side skirt dimensions, and to find an optimal configuration. In two separate phases of optimization conducted with different constraints, the most influential parameters are identified in achieving significant aerodynamic drag reduction relative to a base configuration. The result was corroborated by on-road fuel economy testing.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2843
Xu Kuang, Jianqiang Wang, Keqiang Li
Transport vehicles consume a large amount of fuel with low efficiency, which is significantly affected by driver behavior. An assessment system of eco-driving pattern for buses could identify the deficiencies of driver operation as well as assist transportation enterprises in driver management. This paper proposes an assessment method regarding drivers’ economic efficiency, considering driving conditions obtained from the GPS data and an online map database. To this end, assessment indexes are extracted from driving economy theories and ranked according to their effect on fuel consumption, derived from a database of 135 buses using multiple regression. The 12 selected characteristic indexes represent four aspects of driving behavior including speed, acceleration, engine and accessories control. A layered structure of assessment indexes is developed with application of AHP, and the weight of each index is estimated.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2778
Joe Steiber, Coralie Cooper, John Whitefoot, James MacIsaac
A study was funded by NHTSA to help inform the Phase 2 GHG and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles. The goal of the study was to review technologies that could be used by Class 2b through Class 8 trucks to comply with possible future regulatory requirements, and determine their potential performance. The vehicles and engines selected for the study had extensive experimental data available from earlier work. The four trucks were a Kenworth T700 tractor, a Kenworth T270 box delivery truck, a Ford F-650 tow truck, and a Ram 2500 / 3500 pickup. For the long haul tractor, a Detroit DD15 engine was used. The pickup and medium-duty trucks used two different ratings of the Cummins ISB diesel, as well as a 6.2 liter naturally-aspirated gasoline V-8 and a turbocharged, direct-injected 3.5 liter gasoline V-6. All engine simulations were performed with GT-POWER.
2015-09-23
Event
Research and development efforts that enable the use of alternative energy sources for aviation, with emphasis on commercial aviation fuels and energies that can supplement or replace current crude oil-derived kerosene jet fuels. Environmental, technical, economic and logistical challenges found in the production and use of alternative jet fuels.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 14834

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