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2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2325
Midhat Talibi, Paul Hellier, Nicos Ladommatos
The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to liquid fuels presents an alternative to the current production of renewable fuels for IC engines from food crops. However, realising the potential for reductions in net CO2 emissions through the utilisation of, for example, waste biomass for sustainable fuel production requires that energy and resource inputs into such processes be minimised. This work therefore investigates the combustion and emission characteristics of five intermediate platform molecules potentially derived from lignocellulosic biomass: gamma-valerolactone (GVL), methyl valerate, furfuryl alcohol, furfural and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (MTHF). The study was conducted on a naturally aspirated, water cooled, single cylinder spark-ignition engine. Each of the platform molecules were blended with reference fossil gasoline at 20 % wt/wt.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2328
Yuanxu Li, Karthik Nithyanandan, Han Wu, Chia-Fon Lee, Zhi Ning
Bio-butanol has been widely investigated as a promising alternative fuel. However, the main issues preventing the industrial-scale production of butanol is its relatively low production efficiency and high cost of production. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE), the intermediate product in the ABE fermentation process for producing bio-butanol, has attracted a lot of interest as an alternative fuel because it not only preserves the advantages of oxygenated fuels, but also lowers the cost of fuel recovery for individual component during fermentation. If ABE could be directly used for clean combustion, the separation costs would be eliminated which save an enormous amount of time and money in the production chain of bio-butanol.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2268
Zhanming Chen, Long Wang, Tiancong Zhang, Qimeng Duan, Ke Zeng
Liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuelled engines have been widely equipped on heavy duty vehicles both for fuel-economic and environmental protection concerns, however, they always suffer from deteriorated combustion performance and flame stability due to relatively low burning velocity of methane for lean mixture. In this paper, experimental study was conducted on a turbo-charged, spark-ignition, lean-burn LNG engine with methanol port injection. The combustion characteristics such as cylinder pressure traces, heat release rate (HRR), mass fraction burned (MFB), ignition delay, centroid of heat release, position of CA50 and CA90, as well as cyclic variation of peak pressure were analysed under light load (BMEP=0.3876MPa) with different methanol substitution rates (MSR=0%, 5.2%, 10.2%, 17.2%). The experimental results show that combustion phase advanced with increment of MSR due to faster burning velocity of methanol.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2256
Muhammad Umer Waqas, Bengt Johansson, Jean-Baptiste MASURIER, Kai Morganti
Future internal combustion engines demand higher efficiency, progression towards is limited by antiknock quality of present fuels and energy economics in octane enhancement. A possible solution is Octane-on-Demand, that uses a combination of high and low octane fuels in separated tanks to generate fuels of the required octane rating according to demand. Methanol, a RON 109 fuel was selected as the high octane fuel and five low octane fuels were used as base fuel. These were FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) gasolines, more specifically FACE I, J and A and their primary reference fuels (iso-octane/n-heptane). Experiments were conducted with a modified Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine. For SI combustion mode the CFR operated at RON and MON conditions. The engine i.e. also operated in HCCI mode to get the auto ignition properties at lean conditions (λ=3).
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2197
Vignesh Pandian Muthuramalingam, Anders Karlsson
Owing to increased interest in blended fuels for automotive applications, a great deal of understanding is sought for the behavior of multicomponent fuel sprays. This sets a new requirement on spray model since the volatility of the fuel components in a blend can vary substantially. It calls for careful solution to implement the differential evaporation process concerning thermodynamic equilibrium while maintaining a robust solution. This work presents the Volvo Stochastic Blob and Bubble (VSB2) spray model for multicomponent fuels. A direct numerical method is used to calculate the evaporation of multicomponent fuel droplets. The multicomponent fuel model is implemented into OpenFoam CFD code and the case simulated is a constant volume combustion vessel. The CFD code is used to calculate liquid penetration length for surrogate diesel (n-dodecane)-gasoline (iso-octane) blend and the result is compared with experimental data.
2017-09-26
Event
Research and development efforts that enable the use of alternative energy sources for aviation, with emphasis on commercial aviation fuels and energies that can supplement or replace current crude oil-derived kerosene jet fuels. Environmental, technical, economic and logistical challenges found in the production and use of alternative jet fuels.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2138
Arun Zore, Shriraj Kale, Sangram Jadhav
The experimental study has been carried out on Compression Ignition (CI) Engine using Simarouba Methyl Ester as an alternative fuel for optimization of Performance (Specific Fuel Consumption) and Emissions (Carbon Monoxide, Oxide of Nitrogen) characteristics using Taguchi and Multiple Regression analysis. This study includes combine effect of four input parameters such as; percentage blend (FF), compression ratio (CR), fuel injection pressure (FIP) and injection timing (IT); (before TDC) for controlling the output variables such as specific fuel consumption (SFC), carbon monoxide (CO) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx). Four levels were selected to each input parameter and Taguchi’s L16 orthogonal array has been applied in present study to reduce the number of experiments. The data obtained from the experiments has been analysed using Taguchi method and Multiple regression analysis to obtain the optimum values for four input parameters.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2136
Almuddin Rustum Sayyad, Pratik Salunke, Sangram Jadhav
The objective of this work is to optimize the operating parameters of the Direct Injection single cylinder (5.2 kw) CI engine with respect to Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTHE), Hydro carbons (HC) and Carbon dioxide (CO2). For this investigation, we used Simarouba Biodiesel as an alternate fuel for diesel fuel which possesses low cetane number which is not sufficient to operate existing diesel engine. However, this could be combined with the diesel fuel in the form of blends. For this investigation four levels and four parameters were selected viz. Injection Pressure (IP), Fuel Fraction (FF), Compression Ratio (CR) and Injection Timing (Before TDC). Taguchi Method is used for minimizing the number of experiments and Multiple Regression Analysis is used to find the optimum condition. Three outputs variables such as; Brake Thermal Efficiency (BTHE), content of HC particles and CO2 in the emission are measured and considered its influence on CI Engine performance.
2017-09-19
Technical Paper
2017-01-2137
Dnyaneshwar V. Kadam, Sangram D. Jadhav
Vibration is the most considerable factor in dynamics of machinery. Vibration causes unfavorable effects on engine components and may reduce the life of engine. The conventional fossil fuel sources are limited in the world. The dependency on diesel should be reduced by using biodiesel as an alternative fuel in next few years. The input parameters are affected on engine performance and emission. The present study mainly focuses on an optimization of vibrations, performance and emission using Taguchi and multiple regression analysis for biodiesel as a fuel. The test was performed on single cylinder, four-stroke, diesel engine with VCR. Taguchi method is used to prepare the design of experiment of L16 array for minimizing number of experiments and multiple regression analysis for finding the best relationship between the input and output parameters. The selected input parameters are: fuel fraction, compression ratio, injection pressure and injection timing.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0116
Ekarong Sukjit, Pansa Liplap, Somkiat Maithomklang, Weerachai Arjharn
In this study, two oxygenated fuels consisting of butanol and diethyl ether (DEE), both possess same number of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atom but difference functional group, were blended with the waste plastic pyrolysis oil to use in a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine without any engine modification. In addition, the effect of castor oil addition to such fuel blends was also investigated. Four tested fuels with same oxygen content were prepared for engine test, comprising DEE16 (84% waste plastic oil blended with 16% DEE), BU16 (84% waste plastic oil blended with 16% butanol), DEE11.5BIO5 (83.5% waste plastic oil blended with 11.5% DEE and 5% castor oil) and BU11.5BIO5 (83.5% waste plastic oil blended with 11.5% butanol and 5% castor oil). The results found that the DEE addition to waste plastic oil increased more emissions than the butanol addition at low engine operating condition.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0081
Luigi De Simio, Michele Gambino, Sabato Iannaccone
In recent years the use of alternative fuels for internal combustion engines has had a strong push coming from both technical and economic-environmental aspects. Among these, gaseous fuels such as liquefied petroleum gas and natural gas have occupied a segment no longer negligible in the automotive industry, thanks to their adaptability, anti-knock capacity, lower toxicity of pollutants, reduced CO2 emissions and cost effectiveness. On the other hand, diesel engines still represent the reference category among the internal combustion engines in terms of consumptions. The possibility offered by the dual fuel (DF) systems, to combine the efficiency and performance of a diesel engine with the advantages offered by the gaseous fuels, has been long investigated. However the simple replacement of diesel fuel with natural gas does not allow to optimize the performance of the engine due to the high THC emissions particularly at lower loads.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0078
R. Vallinayagam, S. Vedharaj, Yanzhao An, Alaaeldin Dawood, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Mani Sarathy, Bengt Johansson
Abstract Light naphtha is the light distillate from crude oil and can be used in compression ignition (CI) engines; its low boiling point and octane rating (RON = 64.5) enable adequate premixing. This study investigates the combustion characteristics of light naphtha (LN) and its multicomponent surrogate under various start of injection (SOI) conditions. LN and a five-component surrogate for LN, comprised of 43% n-pentane, 12% n-heptane, 10% 2-methylhexane, 25% iso-pentane and 10% cyclo-pentane, has been tested in a single cylinder optical diesel engine. The transition in combustion homogeneity from CI combustion to homogenized charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion was then compared between LN and its surrogate. The engine experimental results showed good agreement in combustion phasing, ignition delay, start of combustion, in-cylinder pressure and rate of heat release between LN and its surrogate.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0082
Muhammad Umer Waqas, Nour Atef, Eshan Singh, Jean-Baptiste MASURIER, Mani Sarathy, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The blending of ethanol with PRF (Primary reference fuel) 84 was investigated and compared with FACE (Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines) A gasoline surrogate which has a RON of 83.9. Previously, experiments were performed at four HCCI conditions but the chemical effect responsible for the non-linear blending behavior of ethanol with PRF 84 and FACE A was not understood. Hence, in this study the experimental measurements were simulated using zero-dimensional HCCI engine model with detailed chemistry in CHEMKIN PRO. Ethanol was used as an octane booster for the above two base fuels in volume concentration of 0%, 2%, 5% and 10%. The geometrical data and the intake valve closure conditions were used to match the simulated combustion phasing with the experiments. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) was detected by performing heat release analysis.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0080
Ross Ryskamp, Gregory Thompson, Daniel Carder, John Nuszkowski
Abstract Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) is a form of dual-fuel combustion that exploits the reactivity difference between two fuels to control combustion phasing. This combustion approach limits the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and soot while retaining high thermal efficiency. The research presented herein was performed to determine the influences that high reactivity (diesel) fuel properties have on RCCI combustion characteristics, exhaust emissions, fuel efficiency, and the operable load range. A 4-cylinder, 1.9 liter, light-duty compression-ignition (CI) engine was converted to run on diesel fuel (high reactivity fuel) and compressed natural gas (CNG) (low reactivity fuel). The engine was operated at 2100 revolutions per minute (RPM), and at two different loads, 3.6 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) and 6 bar BMEP.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0083
Hassan Khatamnejad, Shahram Khalilarya, Samad Jafarmadar, Mostafa Mirsalim, Mufaddel Dahodwala
Abstract RCCI strategy gained popularity in automotive applications due to lower fuel consumption, less emissions formation and higher engine performance in compared with other diesel combustion strategies. This study presents results of an experimental and numerical investigation on RCCI combustion using natural gas as a low reactivity premixed fuel with advanced injection of diesel fuel as a high reactivity fuel in a CI engine. An advanced three dimensional CFD simulation coupled with chemical kinetic developed to examine the effects of diesel injection timing, diesel/natural gas ratio and diesel fuel included spray angle on combustion and emissions formation in various engine loads and speeds, in a heavy duty diesel engine.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0086
Yanzhao An, S. Vedharaj, R. Vallinayagam, Alaaeldin Dawood, Jean-Baptiste MASURIER, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatic on combustion stratification and particulate emissions for PRF60. Experiments were performed in an optical CI engine at a speed of 1200 rpm for TPRF0 (100% v/v PRF60), TPRF20 (20% v/v toluene + 80% PRF60) and TPRF40 (40% v/v toluene + 60% PRF60). TPRF mixtures were prepared in such a way that the RON of all test blends was same (RON = 60). Single injection strategy with a fuel injection pressure of 800 bar was adopted for all test fuels. Start of injection (SOI) was changed from early to late fuel injection timings, representing various modes of combustion viz HCCI, PPC and CDC. High-speed video of the in-cylinder combustion process was captured and one-dimensional stratification analysis was performed from the intensity of images. Particle size, distribution and concentration were measured and linked with the in-cylinder combustion images.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0087
Maxime Pochet, Ida Truedsson, Fabrice Foucher, Hervé Jeanmart, Francesco Contino
Abstract Ammonia and hydrogen can be produced from water, air and excess renewable electricity (Power-to-fuel) and are therefore a promising alternative in the transition from fossil fuel energy to cleaner energy sources. An Homogeneous-Charge Compression-Ignition (HCCI) engine is therefore being studied to use both fuels under a variable blending ratio for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) production. Due to the high auto-ignition resistance of ammonia, hydrogen is required to promote and stabilize the HCCI combustion. Therefore the research objective is to investigate the HCCI combustion of varying hydrogen-ammonia blending ratios in a 16:1 compression ratio engine. A specific focus is put on maximizing the ammonia proportion as well as minimizing the NOx emissions that could arise from the nitrogen contained in the ammonia.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0089
S. Vedharaj, R. Vallinayagam, Yanzhao An, Alaaeldin Dawood, Mohammad Izadi Najafabadi, Bart Somers, Junseok Chang, Bengt Johansson
Abstract The literature study on PPC in optical engine reveals investigations on OH chemiluminescence and combustion stratification. So far, mostly PRF fuel is studied and it is worthwhile to examine the effect of fuel properties on PPC. Therefore, in this work, fuel having different octane rating and physical properties are selected and PPC is studied in an optical engine. The fuels considered in this study are diesel, heavy naphtha, light naphtha and their corresponding surrogates such as heptane, PRF50 and PRF65 respectively. Without EGR (Intake O2 = 21%), these fuels are tested at an engine speed of 1200 rpm, fuel injection pressure of 800 bar and pressure at TDC = 35 bar. SOI is changed from late to early fuel injection timings to study PPC and the shift in combustion regime from CI to PPC is explored for all fuels. An increased understanding on the effect of fuel octane number, physical properties and chemical composition on combustion and emission formation is obtained.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0091
Hyun Woo Won, Alexandre Bouet, Joseph KERMANI, Florence Duffour
Abstract Reducing the CO2 footprint, limiting the pollutant emissions and rebalancing the ongoing shift demand toward middle-distillate fuels are major concerns for vehicle manufacturers and oil refiners. In this context, gasoline-like fuels have been recently identified as good candidates. Straight run naphtha, a refinery stream derived from the atmospheric crude oil distillation process, allows for a reduction of both NOx and particulate emissions when used in compression-ignition engines. CO2 benefits are also expected thanks to naphtha’s higher H/C ratio and energy content compared to diesel. In previous studies, wide ranges of Cetane Number (CN) naphtha fuels have been evaluated and CN 35 naphtha fuel has been selected. The assessment and the choice of the required engine hardware adapted to this fuel, such as the compression ratio, bowl pattern, nozzle design and air-path technology, have been performed on a light-duty single cylinder compression-ignition engine.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0092
Francesco Catapano, Silvana Di Iorio, Paolo Sementa, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Abstract Fuel depletion as well as the growing concerns on environmental issues prompt to the use of more eco-friendly fuels. The compressed natural gas (CNG) is considered one of the most promising alternative fuel for engine applications because of the lower emissions. Nevertheless, recent studies highlighted the presence of ultrafine particle emissions at the exhaust of CNG engines. The present study aims to investigate the effect of CNG on particle formation and emissions when it was direct injected and when it was dual fueled with gasoline. In this latter case, the CNG was direct injected and the gasoline port fuel injected. The study was carried out on a transparent single cylinder SI engine in order to investigate the in-cylinder process by real time non-intrusive diagnostics. In-cylinder 2D chemiluminescence measurements from UV to visible were carried out.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0093
Lorenzo Bartolucci, Stefano Cordiner, Vincenzo Mulone, Vittorio Rocco
Abstract Using natural gas in internal combustion engines (ICEs) is emerging as a promising strategy to improve thermal efficiency and reduce exhaust emissions. One of the main benefits related to the use of this fuel is that the engine can be run with lean mixtures without compromising its performances. However, as the mixture is leaned out beyond the Lean Misfire Limit (LML), several technical problems are more likely to occur. The flame propagation speed gradually decreases, leading to a slower heat release and a low combustion quality, thus increasing the occurrence of misfiring and incomplete combustions. This in turn results in a sharp increment in CO and UHC emissions, as well as in cycle-to-cycle variability. In order to limit the above-mentioned problems, different solutions have been proposed over the last decade.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0096
Laura Sophie Baumgartner, Stephan Karmann, Fabian Backes, Andreas Stadler, Georg Wachtmeister
Abstract Due to its molecular structure, methane provides several advantages as fuel for internal combustion engines. To cope with nitrogen oxide emissions high levels of excess air are beneficial, which on the other hand deteriorates the flammability and combustion duration of the mixture. One approach to meet these challenges and ensure a stable combustion process are fuelled prechambers. The flow and combustion processes within these prechambers are highly influenced by the position, orientation, number and overall cross-sectional area of the orifices connecting the prechamber and the main combustion chamber. In the present study, a water-cooled single cylinder test engine with a displacement volume of 0.5 l is equipped with a methane-fuelled prechamber. To evaluate influences of the aforementioned orifices several prechambers with variations of the orientation and number of nozzles are used under different operating conditions of engine speed and load.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0098
Christophe Barro, Curdin Nani, Richard Hutter, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract The operation of dual fuel engines, operated with natural gas as main fuel, offers the potential of substantial savings in CO2. Nevertheless, the operating map area where low pollutant emissions are produced is very narrow. Especially at low load, the raw exhaust gas contains high concentrations of unburned methane and, with high pilot fuel portions due to ignition limitations, also soot. The analysis of the combustion in those conditions in particular is not trivial, since multiple combustion modes are present concurrently. The present work focuses on the evaluation of the individual combustion modes of a dual fuel engine, operated with natural gas as main and diesel as pilot fuel, using a combustion model. The combustion has been split in two partwise concurrent combustion phases: the auto-ignition phase and the premixed flame propagation phase.
2017-09-04
Journal Article
2017-24-0097
Epaminondas Mastorakos, Patton Allison, Andrea Giusti, Pedro De Oliveira, Sotiris Benekos, Yuri Wright, Christos Frouzakis, Konstantinos Boulouchos
Abstract Large-bore natural gas engines may use pre-chamber ignition. Despite extensive research in engine environments, the exact nature of the jet, as it exits the pre-chamber orifice, is not thoroughly understood and this leads to uncertainty in the design of such systems. In this work, a specially-designed rig comprising a quartz pre-chamber fit with an orifice and a turbulent flowing mixture outside the pre-chamber was used to study the pre-chamber flame, the jet, and the subsequent premixed flame initiation mechanism by OH* and CH* chemiluminescence. Ethylene and methane were used. The experimental results are supplemented by LES and 0D modelling, providing insights into the mass flow rate evolution at the orifice and into the nature of the fluid there. Both LES and experiment suggest that for large orifice diameters, the flow that exits the orifice is composed of a column of hot products surrounded by an annulus of unburnt pre-chamber fluid.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0114
Michel Cuijpers, Michael Golombok, Hylke Van Avendonk, Michael Boot
Recently imposed sulfur caps on shipping fuels in so-called sulfur emission control areas (SECA) are forcing shipping companies to sail on more or less automotive grade diesel in lieu of the considerably less expensive but sulfur-laden heavy fuel oil (HFO). This development is an opportunity for a bio-based substitute, given that most biomass is sulfur free by default. Cracking biomass to an HFO substitute will require both lower capital and operational expenditures - currently less viscous automotive grade fuels are the targeted product. Lower production costs should translate directly into higher profits for biorefineries. We demonstrate the principle of producing a bio-based low sulfur HFO (LSHFO) by cracking lignin - a residual phenolic polymer from cellulosic bioethanol production – with a novel subcritical solvolysis reaction in a mixture of water and ethylene glycol monobutyl ether or EGBE.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0039
Daniele Piazzullo, Michela Costa, Youngchul Ra, Vittorio ROCCO, Ankith Ullal
Bio-derived fuels are drawing more and more attention in the internal combustion engine (ICE) research field in recent years. Those interests in use of renewable biofuels in ICE applications derive from energy security issues and, more importantly, from environment pollutant emissions concerns. High fidelity numerical study of engine combustion requires advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to be coupled with detailed chemical kinetic models. This task becomes extremely challenging if real fuels are taken into account, as they include a mixture of hundreds of different hydrocarbons, which prohibitively increases computational cost. Therefore, along with employing surrogate fuel models, reduction of detailed kinetic models for multidimensional engine applications is preferred. In the present work, a reduced mechanism was developed for primary reference fuel (PRF) using the directed relation graph (DRG) approach. The mechanism was generated from an existing detailed mechanism.
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