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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2439
2015-10-04
Event
This session will debate the interference in the development of Motorsport brake systems and brake systems or High Performance Road cars. The question will be discused whether Motorsport is a valid test field for High Performance road cars, and what synergies can be found between thess two areas.
2015-09-08 ...
  • September 8-10, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Driven by the need for lower emissions, better fuel economy and improved drive quality, optimized powertrain calibrations are required for the many different vehicle configurations on today's roadways. While powertrain components such as the internal combustion engine, transmission, and hybrid electric powertrain are somewhat familiar to the automotive industry, the control theory, calibrations and system interactions between these components are a relatively unfamiliar aspect.
2015-08-18 ...
  • August 18-19, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • November 2-3, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2015-06-10
Event
2015-06-10
Event
2015-06-10
Event
This session seeks to cover advances in design for reduced noise and vibration, including advanced controls. This session will also include technologies/techniques for reducing engine emissions.
2015-06-04
Event
2015-06-03 ...
  • June 3-5, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • December 9-11, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2015-04-21
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2015-04-21
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2015-04-20
Event
Fuel consumption continues to be a key focus area for on-highway trucks. Not only does it directly affect the bottom line for the customer, but it is also relevant in the context of current and future Green House Gas regulations. Truck fuel economy is impacted by a number of factors including aerodynamics, rolling resistance, duty cycles, driver habits, as well as engine and overall powertrain efficiency. Building blocks towards improved engine and powertrain efficiency will be discussed as part of this presentation.
2015-04-20
Event
To cope with future stringent CO2 emission regulations, further engine evolution is required. Internal combustion engine still remains much room for the fuel economy improvement. Mazda has been working on further fuel economy improvement by focusing on seven main control factors. This presentation provides the future steps to close to the ideal internal combustion engines. As an example of control factors, heat transfer to wall is focused and some application to be shown by CAE and experimental analysis.
2015-04-20
Event
Well-mixed lean SI engine operation can provide efficiency improvements of the fuel economy relative to that of traditional well-mixed stoichiometric SI operation. However, the realized gains depend on the ability to ensure both stable and complete combustion. In this work, several enabling techniques are compared using performance testing in combination with plasma and flame imaging. Specifically, multi-pulse transient plasma ignition is compared to a conventional high-energy inductive spark ignition system. Combined effects of fuel type (gasoline or E85) and intake-gas preheating are examined. Lastly, the effects of dilution type (air or EGR) on lean stability limits are clarified. The largest efficiency improvement was found for lean gasoline operation using intake preheating, showing a 20% fuel-economy improvement relative to traditional non-dilute stoichiometric operation.
2015-04-20
Event
Lugo presents a new variable stroke engine that in addition to being a true mechanical Atkinson cycle, with shorter intake/compression strokes and longer expansion/exhaust strokes (with all the benefits associated with this cycle), also provides an unprecedented positive torque between 15º before Top Dead Center (TDC) and TDC. In this engine, all combustion events that take place in that interval become positive torque and not engine-damaging activities. This feature is considered to be a potential key to making Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) a commercial reality. Lugo provides the engine design engineer with an Atkinson cycle, a full 15º before TDC to implement HCCI ignition strategies and the possibility of compression ratios greater than 17:1. The Lugo engine technology consists mainly of adding a fixed pinion gear and a crown cam to each cylinder of the engine.
2015-04-20
Event
Since 2008, Pinnacle Engines has been developing a 4-stroke opposed-piston reciprocating sleeve-valve engine technology. The program began with a 250cc proof-of-concept engine and moved on to a 110cc 2-wheeler design with an OEM joint development partner starting in 2011. Recent testing by the OEM recorded 30% fuel efficiency improvement in vehicle drive cycle tests at 65% of regulated NOx. The 110cc engine has delivered 225 g/kw-hr BSFC on local CA 87 octane pump gasoline, below 50ppm NOx at mid load, and has successfully completed a 400 hour alternating full power/torque durability test.
2015-04-20
Event
Current regulations and market demands are driving the pursuit of clean, high-efficiency engine technology. In light duty markets dominated by gasoline powered vehicles (like the U.S.), advanced combustion strategies that use commercially available gasoline are highly prized. Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) is a promising path to higher efficiency gasoline engines by combining the efficiency advantages of diesel engines with the emissions friendliness of gasoline. Recent work suggests that GCI technology can span the entire engine speed/load range, provide high efficiency and ultra-low emissions. Progress on developing strategies to enhance the robustness and performance of GCI technology will be discussed.
2015-04-20
Event
This presentation describes an alternative approach to efficiently recover waste exhaust heat within a single thermodynamic cycle. This is achieved via a "split cycle" where intake and compression are carried out in one cylinder and combustion plus expansion and exhaust in another. Current experimental work has been focused on the injection of liquid nitrogen to achieve isothermal compression, and combustion system development using a medium duty one litre/cylinder configuration. Whilst a number of technical challenges remain, results show that this concept has the potential to achieve thermal efficiencies of over 60% whilst using relatively conventional reciprocating engine components and systems.
2015-04-20
Event
The internal combustion engine has great potential for high fuel efficiency. The ideal otto and diesel cycles can easily achieve more than 70% thermodynamic efficiency. The problems come when those cycles should be implemented in a real engine. Extreme peak pressure during the cycle will call for a very robust engine structure that in turn will increase friction and hence reduce mechanical efficiency. A very high compression ratio also increase the surface to volume ratio and promote heat losses, taking away much of the benefits from the theoretical cycle. The presentation will start with a standard SI engine and it’s efficiency as a function of load. Then a high compression ratio SI with be introduced and compared with the same engine operated in HCCI mode. The four efficiencies of SI as well as HCCI will be discussed and variations like HCCI with negative valve overlap and higher mean piston speed will be shown. A next step is the results with Partially Premixed Combustion.
2015-04-20
Event
The blended gasoline and diesel fuel (G80D20) with low octane number and high volatility is tested on a single cylinder diesel engine under different operating conditions to compare the combustion and emission characteristics of Partially Premixed Compression Ignition (PPCI) and Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) modes in order to optimize the combustion controlling strategies. The test results show that PPCI and MPCI modes can be realized using the low octane fuel in a wide operating range of the engine. At the low loads in the whole speed, the single injection PPCI is the best choice to obtain the high efficiency and low emissions of the engine. At medium and high loads with medium and high speeds, the MPCI is the best. The multi-injection PPCI is mostly suitable for the high loads with high speeds.
2015-04-19
Event
While lean operation in spark ignition engines has previously demonstrated the ability to increase thermal efficiency, the degree of enleanment capability of the system is limited by increasingly unstable combustion in the lean region. Turbulent Jet Ignition (TJI) is a pre-chamber-based combustion system that extends this lean limit beyond the capabilities of modern light duty spark ignition engines. In the present study, the thermal efficiency improvement pathways of the system are explored through an examination of experimental results. Corresponding simulation results describe the mechanics of TJI. Finally, the applicability of the concept as a high efficiency engine technology is discussed.
2015-04-19
Event
Ultraboost was a collaborative research project which was co-funded by the UK Technology Strategy Board (TSB), the UK's innovation agency. The project investigated a 60% downsized, highly boosted, 2.0L in-line 4 cylinder prototype gasoline direct injection engine, designed to achieve 35% CO2 emissions reduction without compromising the performance of a 5.0L V8 naturally aspirated production engine. This entailed operating at 35Bar BMEP and in excess of 140kW/L. This presentation reviews the outcomes of the project along with some of the latest findings from the research that is now ongoing. The presentation will also highlight ongoing research at the University of Bath to investigate alternative engine boosting systems to support extreme engine downsizing and the potential synergies of EGR to support high load operation and part load fuel economy.
2015-04-19
Event
The most significant technology trend with future Gasoline engines is the increasing application of turbocharged GDI. For mainstream TGDI the power ranges between 65-95 kW/l, BMEP between 17- 25 bar and a minimum BSFC around 230-240 g/kWh. In future, this range will be significantly extended. AVL already demonstrated 168 kW/l in a demo car and 200 kW/l is under development. Miller/Atkinson cycle plus high compression ratio and cooled EGR enable a 200 g/kWh BSFC level, however, compromise full load performance. To obtain both high power and high efficiency, variable valve lift and variable compression ratio have to be combined.
2015-04-19
Event
Transport energy will continue to be mostly supplied by oil and there will be sufficient oil supply to meet the growing demand over the next 25 years. The demand growth will be in non-OECD countries and will be heavily skewed towards diesel and jet fuel rather than gasoline. Future fuel properties will also be affected by engine development trends. Spark Ignition (SI) engines have to improve their efficiency and this will increase the pressures to improve gasoline anti-knock quality which is traditionally specified by Research and Motor Octane Numbers (RON and MON). These changes in the demand structure will require big investments by the refining industry and will increase the availability of low octane components such as naphtha. Also, in modern efficient SI engines, for a given RON, a fuel of lower MON will have higher anti-knock quality. Fuel specifications, which are central to fuels manufacture, will need to be brought in line with engine requirements.
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