Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 2428
Training / Education
2014-12-03
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%. This web seminar will explore turbocharging for gasoline and diesel (heavy and light duty) engines, including the fundamentals of turbocharging, design features, performance measures, and matching and selection criteria. It will discuss the interaction between turbocharging and engine systems and the impact on performance, fuel economy and emissions. Developments in turbocharging technology such as variable geometry mechanisms, two-stage and sequential (series & parallel) turbocharging, EGR including low pressure loop, high pressure loop and mixed mode systems and novel turbocharging systems will be described using figures and data.
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
The internal combustion engine will continue to be integral to the transportation of people and goods for the foreseeable future. To reduce environmental impact and improve energy security, many nations are enacting new aggressive fuel economy and emissions standards which are pushing the development of new engine technologies on an unprecedented scale. These new technologies coupled with advances in sensors and onboard computers will enable real-world implementations of new combustion concepts as well as new fuel pathways that blend the best characteristics of spark-ignition and compress-ignition engines for maximum efficiency with lowest possible emissions. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several ongoing activities exploring the intersection of fuel chemistry and advanced combustion processes including reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion, gasoline partially premixed combustion (PPC), and the use of in-cylinder thermo-chemical reforming (TCR) to compensate fuel-specific differences on the combustion process.
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
With the increased demands for fuel efficiency and fuel economy, the internal combustion engine (ICE) continues to be examined for design improvements to improve these measures. It is projected that OEMs and suppliers will continue to optimize the ICE at least through 2020. Focusing on the near- and long-term role of the ICE in advanced vehicles and highlighting this accelerating development and calibration; high efficiency combustion and controls; advances in turbo machinery, valve technology or ignition systems; and emission control challenges. Overall, the program may examine several technological advances required to maximize efficiency, including: • Advanced, low-temperature combustion techniques • Improved understanding and modeling of heat loss mechanisms • Electrification and intelligent control of accessory loads • Possible redesign of mechanical systems (e.g., variable stroke for fully expanded cycles) • High-efficiency turbo-machinery to extract exhaust energy and provide boost Emissions, Monitoring, Measurement, Control and Energy Savings Strategies for the Future.
Event
2014-11-05
Event
2014-11-05
The scale of China’s auto industry has been firmly held the first in the world; its volume reached 22 million in 2013 and further growth is predictable as well. While, the constraints to China’s auto industry are becoming more obvious, among them the energy issue is an especially challenging one to the country. This leads to a stricter CAFC regulation in China--its standard of 5.0L/100km in 2020 is quite hard to be fulfilled. The energy-efficient technologies would thus be one of the core competences for enterprises. In this presentation, the maturity, potential and prospect of technologies, the law-conformance and the consumer-cognition will be discussed in detail.
Event
2014-11-05
The scale of China’s auto industry has been firmly held the first in the world; its volume reached 22 million in 2013 and further growth is predictable as well. While, the constraints to China’s auto industry are becoming more obvious, among them the energy issue is an especially challenging one to the country. This leads to a stricter CAFC regulation in China--its standard of 5.0L/100km in 2020 is quite hard to be fulfilled. The energy-efficient technologies would thus be one of the core competences for enterprises. In this presentation, the maturity, potential and prospect of technologies, the law-conformance and the consumer-cognition will be discussed in detail.
Event
2014-11-05
Event
2014-11-05
Combustion simulations and single cylinder engine tests show a clear potential when coupling the Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) engine with the Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) technologies.
Event
2014-11-05
Standards for reducing emissions and increasing fuel efficiencies are creating a need for OEMs to develop lighter vehicles to achieve these requirements. This Forum has been designed to provide automobile manufacturers and suppliers the latest advances in manufacturing strategies, design and materials selection strategies to promote lighter weight, higher performing, fuel efficient vehicles without sacrificing safety or performance. It will feature presentations on the latest breakthroughs in lightweight materials and cutting-edge adaptive applications from OEMs, Tier 1 suppliers, universities, and research institutions. Special focus will be on tangible, cost-effective strategies in lightweighting and energy management. With the increased demands for fuel efficiency and fuel economy, the internal combustion engine (ICE) continues to be examined for design improvements to improve these measures. It is projected that OEMs and suppliers will continue to optimize the ICE at least through 2020.
Event
2014-11-05
Tightening vehicle emission regulations requires additional technology. New technologies, including aerodynamic aids and emissions control systems, add significant weight to vehicles. Meanwhile freight logistics managers are looking for increased freight efficiency through lighter vehicles to increase payload. This discussion will focus on the benefits of switching to aluminum wheels as an easy-to-implement solution to lower overall vehicle weight and increase freight efficiency with added benefits of improved ride, increased tire wear and lower maintenance cost. In addition, the discussion will cover other light weight aluminum component usage to further lower vehicle weight to achieve emission and fuel efficiency improvement.
Event
2014-11-05
Event
2014-11-05
Training / Education
2014-11-03
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized. This seminar will highlight the role of lubricants in improving fuel efficiency and provide strategies for selecting the best oil for a given application. The course begins with a brief overview of the fuel consumption regulations and global perspective of passenger car lubricants and diesel oil specifications in North America, Europe and Asia. Limitations and advantages of various methods to measure fuel consumption in a variety of bench tests, dyno tests and actual vehicles will be presented.
Event
2014-10-20
This session focuses on technologies such as advanced and partially mixed combustion, cooled EGR boosting, ignition and direct injection technologies, pressure boosting, intelligent combustion, thermal efficiency, fully variable valvetrains, and other new and developing technologies. Papers focused on waste heat recovery technologies should be submitted to HX102/103.
Training / Education
2014-10-16
Developing vehicles that achieve optimum fuel economy and acceleration performance is critical to the success of any automotive company, yet many practicing engineers have not received formal training on the broad range of factors which influence vehicle performance. This seminar provides this fundamental understanding through the development of mathematical models that describe the relevant physics and through the hands-on application of automotive test equipment. Attendees will also be introduced to software used to predict vehicle performance. The course begins with a discussion of the road load forces that act on the automobile (aerodynamic, rolling resistance, and gravitational) followed by a review of pertinent engine characteristics. This background information is then used to show how appropriate gear ratios for a vehicle transmission are selected and to develop models for predicting acceleration performance and fuel economy. The models form the basis for the computer software used to predict vehicle performance.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Le-zhong Fu, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li, Xiao Yu
Internal combustion rankine cycle engine could have high fuel efficiency and ultra-low emission performance. In an ideal ICRC engine, high temperature liquid water is injected into the cylinder near top dead center to control the combustion temperature and cylinder pressure rise rate, and then enhances the thermo efficiency and work. The reason is the extra work fluid into the cylinder in the form of water vapor which can make use of the combustion heat more effectively. Moreover, the high temperature water can be heated up through heat exchanger by exhaust gas and engine cooling system, and the waste heat carried away by engine cooling system and exhaust gas can be recovered and utilized. In this paper, a retrofitted, single-cylinder, air-cooled SI engine with propane fuel is adopted in the test. To simplify the experiments preparation, water is heated up in an electric heater in a high-pressure rail and injected into the cylinder with a solenoid diesel injector. The water injection pressure is obtained from a N2 tank and amplified through the pressure amplifier up to 15~25MPa.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Guillaume Pilla, Loic Francqueville
Reduction of CO2 emissions is becoming one of the great challenges for future gasoline engines. Downsizing is one of the most promising strategy to achieve this reduction, though it facilitates knock phenomena. Therefore downsizing has to be associated with knock limiting technologies such as increased aerodynamics, dilution and thermal measures. High dilution levels allow to push back the knocking limit thus enhancing engine efficiency. The maximum gain of efficiency is therefore closely dependent on the dilution limit. State of the art shows that combustion initiation can be critical for highly diluted mixture combustion. If spark ignition systems are commonly used in GDI engines, they have known few evolutions since their invention. By optimizing key parameters such as spark duration, energy or size, it can be expected significant gain in dilution acceptance on GDI engines. This paper presents the results of innovative ignition systems tests on the dilution acceptance of a 400cc optical GDI engine.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Tapio Pohjalainen, Martti Larmi
This study presents a novel crank mechanism which enables easy and fast compression ratio adjustment. The novel crank mechanism and piston travel is explained and highlighted. The basic idea is to have an eccentric crank pin. The eccentricity is easily adjustable. The first full scale engine demonstration test runs were made in Oulu University engine laboratory. The first test are explained. The first demonstration version is modified from an existing commercial SI engine. A GT-Power simulation model of the engine is made. The benefits of the new crank mechanism are demonstrated by the help of the simulation model. The new mechanism offers great possibilities for ex. to increase the part load performance in SI engines or make the engine adjustable for different fuels with best possible efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Bo Hu, Colin Copeland, Chris Brace, Sam Akehurst, Alessandro ROMAGNOLI, Ricardo Martinez-Botas, J.W.G Turner
Turbocharged engines when operating at high engine speed and load cannot fully utilize the exhaust energy as the wastegate is opened to prevent overboost. Meanwhile, engines equipped with pressure charging systems are more prone to knock partly due the increased intake temperature. The expansion-cooling concept thus is conceived to reduce the intake temperature by recovering some otherwise unexploited exhaust energy. This concept can be applied to any twin charged (supercharger and turbocharger) engine system with an intercooler in between. The turbocharging system is designed to achieve maximum utilization of the exhaust energy, from which the intake charge is overboosted. After the intercooler, the supercharging system behaves like a turbine to expand the over-compressed intake charge and reduce its temperature whilst recovering some energy through the connection to the camshaft. It is anticipated that such a concept has benefits for knock resistance and energy recovery while suffering higher pumping losses.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Patrick Smith, John Heywood, Wai Cheng
With ever tightening CO2 emissions standards, engine efficiency has jumped to the forefront of automotive engine focus. A proven way to realize efficiency gains is through the increase of engine compression ratio. Various experimental and simulation studies are compiled to quantify the effect of compression ratio on modern spark ignited engine efficiency. Four studies are taken from research conducted at the Sloan Automotive Laboratory at MIT and three are from the literature. Compression ratios range between 8 and 13.4 looking at gross indicated efficiency, net indicated efficiency, and brake efficiency. Curves of efficiency versus compression ratio are fit to the data points for each of the studies and normalized about a compression ratio of 10. Average curves for each of the three efficiency types across all data available show that increasing from a compression ratio of 10 to 13 results in relative increases of 5.1% for brake efficiency, 4.6% for gross indicated efficiency, and 4.5% for net indicated efficiency.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2428

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: