Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 2476
2016-04-14 ...
  • April 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • October 18-19, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Developing vehicles that achieve optimum fuel economy and acceleration performance is critical to the success of any automotive company, yet many practicing engineers have not received formal training on the broad range of factors which influence vehicle performance. This seminar provides this fundamental understanding through the development of mathematical models that describe the relevant physics and through the hands-on application of automotive test equipment. Attendees will also be introduced to software used to predict vehicle performance.
2015-12-09 ...
  • December 9-11, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • June 1-3, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 30-December 2, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2015-10-08
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-07
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-07
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-06
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-06
Event
This session explores total vehicle and powertrain technologies for on and off-road commercial vehicles aimed at reduction of CO2 emissions through design, analysis, and testing techniques. The topics may include energy analysis/management/optimization, current and proposed emission legislation, certification techniques, powertrain integration, weight reduction, idle reduction, and friction/parasitic reduction.
2015-10-04
Event
This session will debate the interference in the development of Motorsport brake systems and brake systems or High Performance Road cars. The question will be discused whether Motorsport is a valid test field for High Performance road cars, and what synergies can be found between thess two areas.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2772
Amy Kopin, Steven Musselman
For decades, the heavy-duty (“HD”) commercial vehicle industry has focused on improving fuel economy in order to lower the total operating cost for its customers. Most recently, there has been a revolution in the HD industry which means no longer do OEMs focus on discreet components but instead look at the entire vehicle and operations to improve efficiency; it is likely future gains will come through an integrated approach to optimizing the entire vehicle. The path forward is not sufficiently clear looking into the next decade, nor will one solution work for all manufacturers or all vehicle applications. Therefore, the regulations must be sufficiently adaptive. This paper explores further the ideas presented in other SAE papers that have focused on regulation of engine-only emissions as an approach for the HD commercial vehicle market.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2778
Joe Steiber, Coralie Cooper, John Whitefoot, James MacIsaac
A study was funded by NHTSA to help inform the Phase 2 GHG and Fuel Efficiency Standards for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Engines and Vehicles. The goal of the study was to review technologies that could be used by Class 2b through Class 8 trucks to comply with possible future regulatory requirements, and determine their potential performance. The vehicles and engines selected for the study had extensive experimental data available from earlier work. The four trucks were a Kenworth T700 tractor, a Kenworth T270 box delivery truck, a Ford F-650 tow truck, and a Ram 2500 / 3500 pickup. For the long haul tractor, a Detroit DD15 engine was used. The pickup and medium-duty trucks used two different ratings of the Cummins ISB diesel, as well as a 6.2 liter naturally-aspirated gasoline V-8 and a turbocharged, direct-injected 3.5 liter gasoline V-6. All engine simulations were performed with GT-POWER.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2850
John Kargul, Andrew Moskalik, Kevin Newman, Daniel Barba, Jeffra Rockwell
The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) National Center for Advanced Technology (NCAT), located at its National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory in Ann Arbor, Michigan, has been known for its development and demonstration of numerous low-greenhouse gas and fuel efficient series hydraulic hybrid drivetrain technologies and their application in commercial vehicles. Advances in these very fuel efficient hydraulic hybrid vehicle technologies have led the industry to begin manufacturing these exciting new technologies for both the commercial truck and non-road equipment markets, with development activities continuing in other markets including light-duty vehicles. The commercial emergence of these very low-greenhouse gas emitting hybrids led EPA to decide that the time had come to wind down its leadership role in developing and demonstrating these very fuel efficient technologies.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2821
Xuan Feng, Mahesh Madurai Kumar, Long-Kung Hwang, Travis Anderson, Justin Blomenberg
Diesel-electric powertrains are used by a variety of industrial machines and marine vessels. In such a powertrain configuration, a diesel engine coupled with an electrical generator provides power to electric motors that drive the application. Fuel consumption of such applications account for a majority of the operating cost, and even a small reduction in the percentage of fuel used can translate into considerable cost savings. Hence, methodologies and technologies that can deliver fuel economy improvements are a central focal point for many industries like mining haul trucks, locomotives and marine vessels. This paper describes an ALD methodology applicable to such machines. The case of a mining haul truck application has been used for purposes of illustration. A Matlab/Simulink based model has been developed at Cummins to represent a generic machine with diesel electric powertrain.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2816
Andrei Radulescu, Leighton Roberts, Eric Yankovic
Cylinder deactivation (CDA) is an effective method to adjust the engine displacement, for maximum output and improving fuel economy, by adjusting the numbers of active cylinders in the combustion engines. Switching Roller Finger Followers (SRFF) are an economic solution for CDA that minimize changes and preserve the overall width, height or length of Dual Overhead Cam (DOHC) engines. The CDA SRFF provides the flexibility of transferring or suppressing the camshaft movement to the valves influencing the engine performance and fuel economy by reducing the pumping losses. This paper addresses the performance and durability of the CDA SRFF system in meeting the reliability for modern automobile engines. Extensive tests were conducted to demonstrate the dynamic stability at high engine speeds, and the system capacity of switching between high and low engine displacement within one camshaft revolution.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2830
Shashank Agarwal, Michael Olson, Tim Meehan, Nachiket Wadwankar
Fuel economy is one of the major challenges for both on and off-road vehicles. Inefficient engine operation and loss of kinetic energy in the form of heat during braking are two of the major sources of wasted fuel energy. Rising energy costs, stringent emission norms and increased environmental awareness demand efficient drivetrain designs for the next generation of vehicles. This paper analyses three different types of powertrain concepts for efficient operation of a forklift truck. Starting from a conventional torque converter transmission, hydrostatic transmission and a hydraulic hybrid system (Eaton architecture) are compared for their performance. Eaton hydraulic hybrid system is seen to perform much better compared to other two configurations. Improved performance is attributed to efficient engine operation and regeneration of vehicle kinetic energy during braking.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2807
Katharina Eichler, Yousef Jeihouni, Carl Ritterskamp
In the near future engine emitted carbon dioxides (CO2) are being limited for all vehicle categories with respect to the Green House Gases (GHG) norms. To cope with this challenge, new concepts need to be developed. For this reason waste heat recovery is a promising research field. For commercial vehicles the first phase of CO2 emission legislation will be introduced in the USA in 2014 and will be further tightened towards 2030. Beside the US, CO2 emission legislation for commercial engines will also be introduced in Europe in the near future. The demanded CO2 reduction calls for a better fuel economy which is also of interest for the end user, specifically for the owners of heavy duty diesel vehicles with high mileages. To meet these future legislation objectives, a waste heat recovery system is a beneficial solution to recover the wasted energies from different heat sources in the engine.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2874
Marius-Dorin Surcel, Adime Kofi Bonsi
Lift axles increase the load capacity of a vehicle, allowing it to carry the extra load without the need for multiple vehicles, hence reducing operational costs. Furthermore, additional axles help to distribute the truck’s load across the road surface, reducing the chances of damage to the infrastructure. Lift axles can be raised when the vehicle has lighter load to save fuel and reduce wear and tear to the tires and axles. They can be deployed to improve traction especially in icy off-road applications. The main objective of this project was to assess the fuel-saving potential of lifting axles on unloaded semi-trailers. Part of the mandate was to identify and analyze regulations of various jurisdictions with respect to lift/loadable axles and studies leading to the setting up of these regulations. The SAE Fuel Consumption Test Procedures Type II (J1321) was used for fuel consumption track test evaluations.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2852
Daniel Ribeiro, Rodrigo Chaves, Rogerio Curty Dias, Gian Marques
In order to evaluate the opportunities to use hybrid concepts for heavy commercial vehicles for emerging markets, MAN Latin America has developed a VW refuse truck with 23t GVW using the hybrid hydraulic technology. In site vehicle tests measurements has indicated a fuel savings up to 25%, which means a reduction around 4.08 liters of diesel/hour or 20 tones CO2/year . Thus, a collaborative cooperation with Rio de Janeiro Sanitation Department (Comlurb) was set for a truck evaluation on a real operation. This 03-month evaluation used one VW 17.280 6x2 hybrid hydraulic refuse truck and other VW refuse truck similar standard diesel. A random dispatch system ensures the vehicles are used in a similar manner. Global positioning system logging, fueling, and maintenance records are used to evaluate the performance of this hybrid hydraulic refuse truck.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2885
Nicholas Schaut, Raja Sengupta
As part of the United States Department of Energy’s SuperTruck program, Volvo Trucks and its partners were tasked with demonstrating 50% improvement in overall freight efficiency for a tractor-trailer, relative to a best in class 2009 model year truck. This necessitated that significant gains be made in reducing aerodynamic drag of the tractor-trailer system, so trailer side skirts and a trailer boat tail were employed. A Lattice-Boltzmann based simulation method was used in conjunction with a Kriging Response Surface optimization process in order to efficiently describe a design space of seven independent parameters relating to boat tail and side skirt dimensions, and to find an optimal configuration. In two separate phases of optimization conducted with different constraints, the most influential parameters are identified in achieving significant aerodynamic drag reduction relative to a base configuration. The result was corroborated by on-road fuel economy testing.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2893
Ashok Patidar, Umashanker Gupta, Ankur Bansal
Market driven competition in global trade and urgency for controlling the atmospheric air pollution are the twin forces, which have urged Indian automobile industries to catch up with the international emission norms. Improvement in the fuel efficiency of the vehicles is one way to bind to these stringent norms. It is experimentally proven that almost 45% of the engine power is being consumed to overcome the drag resistance and around 40% to overcome the tire rolling resistance of the vehicle. This as evidence provides a huge scope to investigate the influence of aerodynamic drag and rolling resistances on the fuel consumption of a commercial vehicle. The present work is a numerical study on the influence of aerodynamic drag resistance on the fuel consumption of a commercial passenger bus. The commercial CFD code FLUENT is used as a solver to estimate the drag coefficient of the bus. Around 35% improvement in the drag coefficient is achieved by CFD driven changes in the bus design.
2015-09-18
Event
Global transport will continue to be powered largely by petroleum-based liquid fuels for the foreseeable future. However, the mix of transportation fuels required by the market as well as the composition of fuels will be changing. Gasoline octane needs to increase to enable more efficient spark ignition engines as well as the potential to develop Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) engines which can run on low octane gasoline rather than diesel. This presentation investigates the implications these changes in fuel mix and composition have on petroleum refining, one without and one with the possibility of producing a low octane gasoline for GCI engines.
2015-09-18
Event
Advanced combustion modes are considered to be a key enabling technology, to make the combustion engine meet upcoming fuel economy/CO2 and emission targets. This talk will evaluate the advanced combustion concepts against the market requirements and technical solutions for the required timeframe. This work is supported by the successful implementation and demonstration of advanced combustion modes in the ACCESS project (funded by the US Department of Energy), where Bosch has developed the required engine control solutions and gained first hand experience by implementing the concepts in two demonstration vehicles. Test results and feedback from real world driving of the demonstration cars will complement and round out this picture.
2015-09-18
Event
The historic evolution of ethanol use as a vehicular fuel in the last 40 years in Brazil, either in its anhydrous form blended in gasoline or in the hydrous version in dedicated or flex fuel vehicles, will be presented in conjunction with the production of extraordinary vehicles and special distribution logistics. The historic participation of drivers like energy security, economic and social development and environmental and climate security will be discussed, as well as the role played by the main stakeholders, sugarcane agro-industry, automotive industry and petroleum products sector vis-à-vis the public policies implemented and adjusted during the whole period. The integration aspects of the fuels with engines, after treatments to comply with emissions regulations and availability of refueling facilities are essential to final customer acceptance, although not sufficient. Some examples of knowledge mobilization programs applied in Brazil will be offered.
2015-09-18
Event
2015-09-18
Event
Worlwide, CO2 emissions reduction, as well as air quality management, are high concerns for modern vehicles development. Disruptive targets will challenge OEMs to propose efficient and cost effective solutions. Powertrains are then at a crucial time of their evolutions. Will they be able to handle the challenge of low CO2 emissions? We are at the beginning of a new area of development for gasoline engines: more efficiency, with a cost challenge, world market target, energy procurement, …
2015-09-18
Event
2015-09-18
Event
CO2 emission legislation will remain one of the key drivers for future engine technology. Shell believes that between now and 2030 hydrocarbon based fuels could enable new credible, cost effective technologies to drive further improvement of the WtW CO2 footprint of light duty mobility. The longer term availability of liquid fuels plays a dominant role to assess the feasibility of Gasoline Compression Ignition concepts from an economic perspective and can become a key competitive differentiator for OEMs who are seeking to introduce new types of engines. In this presentation we aim to show pathways to a sustainable future energy supply and derive implications, opportunities and barriers for advanced Compression Ignition engine concepts.
2015-09-18
Event
Gasoline direct injection compression ignition (GDCI) engines have demonstrated high efficiency with low NOx and PM emissions using US market gasoline RON91. The engine could also be downspeeded and uploaded to 20bar BMEP. GDCI engines utilize a full-time, partially-premixed combustion process without combustion mode switching. Injection parameters are used to control mixture stratification and combustion phasing using a multiple-late injection strategy with GDi-like injection pressures. Now the 2nd-generation GDCI engines have been built and tested with improved friction, injection, thermal management, and aftertreatment systems. Preliminary results indicate improved part load efficiency relative to 1st-generation engines with BSFC of ~250 g/kWh at 2000rpm-2bar BMEP. Fuel consumption was improved over the operating map. Initial tailpipe emissions were attractive with good catalyst conversion efficiency for CO and HC species. No aftertreatment was used for NOx and PM.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2476

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: