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2017-11-14 ...
  • November 14-16, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2224
Paul Freeland
REVISED ABASTRACT 4/7/2017 The challenges of maintaining continuous improvements in air quality, manage the earth’s energy resources, and to control atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses, whilst supplying ever increasing global sales volumes mean that ever more detailed understanding and optimisation of powertrain systems is required. Downsizing, electrification and traffic flow management all have very important parts to play in achieving these goals, but can still only modify the outputs of the basic propulsion units, and methods to improve the efficiency, cleanliness and flexibility of powertrains remains a vital development requirement. The paper explores the fuel consumption benefits available from de-throttling technologies that can help to bring gasoline engine efficiency on a par with that of diesel engines.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2348
Michael Clifford Kocsis, Peter Morgan, Alexander Michlberger, Ewan E. Delbridge, Oliver Smith
Increasingly stringent fuel economy and emissions regulations around the World have forced the further optimization of nearly all vehicle systems. Many technologies exist for improvement in fuel economy; however, only a smaller sub-set are commercially feasible due to cost of implementation. One area that can provide a small but significant improvement in fuel economy is the lubrication system of an internal combustion engine. Benefits in fuel economy may be realized by the reduction of engine oil viscosity and the addition of friction modifying additives. In both cases, advanced engine oils allow for a reduction of engine friction. Generally speaking, the impact of chemical additives such as friction modifiers (FMs) is to reduce friction in tribocouples which experience metal-to-metal contact. These conditions commonly occur in valvetrain contacts and between the piston rings and cylinder bore at Top Dead Center (TDC).
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2349
Sarita Seth, Dr Swamy Maloth PhD, Prashant Kumar, Bhuvenesh Tyagi, Lokesh Kumar, Rajendra Mahapatra, Sarita Garg, Deepak Saxena PhD, R Suresh, SSV Ramakumar
Automobile OEMs are looking for improving fuel economy of their vehicles by reducing weight, rolling resistance and improving engine and transmission efficiency apart from the aerodynamic design. Fuel economy may be improved by using appropriate low viscosity and use of friction reducers (FRs) in the engine oils. The concept of high viscosity index is being used for achieving right viscosity at required operating temperatures. In this paper performance properties of High Viscosity Index engine oils have been compared with conventional VI engine oils. Efforts has been made to check the key differentiation in oil properties and finally into oil performance w.r.t. low temperature fluidity, high temperature high shear viscosity/deposits, friction behavior, oxidation performance in bench tribological /engine/chassis dyno tests. Three candidates of SAE 0W-30 grade oil with ACEA C2/API SN credentials have been chosen using various viscosity modifiers.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2226
Edward S. Richardson, Bruno S. Soriano, Mathew Middleton, Michael J. Gill
Cylinder deactivation enables improvements in fuel economy in spark-ignition engines by reducing pumping losses during part load operation. The efficiency benefits of a new intake valve system that enables cycle-by-cycle deactivation of different cylinders is investigated in this study. The system minimises the need for throttling by varying the fraction of strokes that are deactivated in order to vary engine output. The intake valve system involves two intake valves in series, with a fast solenoid-actuated valve upstream of a conventional cam-actuated intake valve. Compared to conventional cam-actuated valves, the new valve system has potential to achieve very rapid closing rates with a high degree of flexibility in respect of the timing of inlet valve closure. The fuel economy benefits provided by a number of valve control strategies are evaluated using a one-dimensional modelling approach, considering a vehicle following the New European Drive Cycle.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2208
Tao Liu, Ziwang Lu, Guangyu Tian
To further explore the potential of fuel economy for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) , an adaptive energy management strategy (EMS) considering driver’s power demand reasonability is proposed, which is necessary to reduce fuel consumption, emission and traffic congestion. To get accurate and reliable control strategy two aspects are the most important: 1) a rigorous and organized modeling approach to describe complicated powertrain system of HEV, 2) a trade off between optimization and real time. The Energetic Macroscopic Representation (EMR) is a graphical synthetic description of electromechanical conversion system based on energy flow. Based on Energetic Macroscopic Representation (EMR) a powertrain architecture of HEV is constructed. Generally EMS includes rule based that can be used online with suboptimal solution and optimization based that ensures the minimum fuel consumption with heavy computation duty and requirement of prior knowledge.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2346
Hong Liu, Jiajia Jin, Hongyu Li, Kazuo Yamamori, Toyoharu Kaneko, Minoru Yamashita, Liping Zhang
According to the Toyota gasoline engine oil requirements, this paper describes that the low viscosity engine oil of 0W-16 has been developed jointly by Sinopec and Toyota,which also conforms to the Toyota specification. As we know, the development of low viscosity gasoline engine oils should not only focus on fuel economy improvement, but shear stability and low speed pre-ignition (LSPI) prevention property should be taken into consideration. The main elements content in the formulation was determined according to the results of Toyota’s previous LSPI research and the initial 0W-16 engine oil had passed Toyota LSPI test. Based on all above, viscosity index improver (VII) with better friction reduction property was selected by the Mini-traction Machine (MTM) and the High-frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) tests.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2232
Ho Teng
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2245
Ho Teng
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2246
Ho Teng
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1921
Jyotirmoy Barman
Abstract Engine down speeding is rapidly picking up momentum in many segment of world market. Numerous engine down speeding packages from OEM have been tailored to take advantage of the increased efficiencies associated with engine down speeding. Running engine at lower rpm has numerous advantages. The most obvious of these is reduced fuel consumption, since the engine can spend more time running within its optimum efficiency range. By down speeding, the engine is made to run at low speeds and with high torques. For the same power, the engine is operated at higher specific load- Brake Mean Effective pressure (BMEP) which results in higher efficiency and reduced fuel consumption-Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). The reasons for increased fuel efficiency are reduced engine friction due to low piston speeds, reduced relative heat transfer and increased thermodynamic efficiency.
2017-06-29
Journal Article
2017-01-9279
Davide Di Battista, Roberto Cipollone
Abstract The use of reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICE) dominates the sector of the on-road transportation, both for passengers and freight. CO2 reduction is the present technological driver, considering the major worldwide greenhouse reduction targets committed by most governments in the western world. In the near future (2020) these targets will require a significant reduction with respect to today’s goals, reinforcing the importance of reducing fuel consumption. In ICEs more than one third of the fuel energy used is rejected into the environment as thermal waste through exhaust gases. Therefore, a greater fuel economy could be achieved if this energy is recovered and converted into useful mechanical or electrical power on board. For long haul vehicles, which run for hundreds of thousands of miles per year at relatively steady conditions, this recovery appears especially worthy of attention.
2017-06-08
Event
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1777
Thomas Wellmann, Kiran Govindswamy, Dean Tomazic
Abstract The automotive industry continues to develop new technologies aimed at reducing overall vehicle level fuel consumption. Powertrain and driveline related technologies will play a key role in helping OEM’s meet fleet CO2 reduction targets for 2025 and beyond. Specifically, use of technologies such as downsized engines, idle start-stop systems, aggressive torque converter lock-up schedules, wide-ratio spread transmissions, and electrified propulsion systems are vital towards meeting aggressive fuel economy targets. Judicious combinations of such powertrain and driveline technology packages in conjunction with measures such as the use of low rolling resistance tires and vehicle lightweighting will be required to meet future OEM fleet CO2 targets. Many of the technologies needed for meeting the fuel economy and CO2 targets come with unique NVH challenges. In order to ensure customer acceptance of new vehicles, it is imperative that these NVH challenges be understood and solved.
2017-05-04
Magazine
Innovations for lightweighting Tough fuel-economy bogies for 2021 and beyond are driving new approaches to materials use, as seen in these case studies. Axellent progress AAM's new Quantum drive-axle technology is a leap forward in lightweight, efficient driveline systems aimed at 2020 and beyond. Low-temperature combustion ready for prime time? At SAE's High-Efficiency IC Engines Symposium, Delphi said its new, third-generation GDCI is promising, but even LTC proponents admit that challenges remain. More automation for ECU testing The latest fault-insertion tests enable engineers to run more test cases in less time.
2017-04-28
Video
In the quest for greater fuel economy, engineers have been squeezing excess weight out of every part of the vehicle. but an item that has mostly escaped their focus, is the heavy drive axle in pickups and large SUVs. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at American Axle's new Quantum axle. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering.
2017-04-18
Video
That police car zooming up behind you may soon have hybrid-electric power. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Editor-In-Chief Lindsay Brooke looks at Ford's new 2018 Police Responder Hybrid. SAE Eye on Engineering also airs Monday mornings on WJR 760 AM Detroit's Paul W. Smith Show. Access archived episodes of SAE Eye on Engineering.
2017-04-06
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-06
Magazine
Connectivity continues its advance More OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers are focusing on embedded telematic systems, hoping to displace aftermarket hardware. Tailoring fuel injection to control NOx The next big step to help heavy-duty diesel engines meet stricter emissions regulations involves adapting the fuel-injection system to the combustion needs. Active on safety Crash-avoidance technologies are vital "building blocks" to automate commercial vehicles, implement truck platooning and ultimately achieve zero accidents. Engineering with simulation and data Companies are discovering new simulation techniques, especially optimization; the next step is to combine simulation with sensor data and predictive analytics to create even more robust off-highway equipment.
2017-04-05
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2017-04-05
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2573

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