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2017-06-08
Event
2017-06-06 ...
  • June 6-8, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 14-16, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2017-05-22 ...
  • May 22-23, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Developing vehicles that achieve optimum fuel economy and acceleration performance is critical to the success of any automotive company, yet many practicing engineers have not received formal training on the broad range of factors which influence vehicle performance. This seminar provides this fundamental understanding through the development of mathematical models that describe the relevant physics and through the hands-on application of automotive test equipment. Attendees will also be introduced to software used to predict vehicle performance.
2017-05-04 ...
  • May 4-5, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • October 17-18, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Shanghai, China
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2017-04-06
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-05
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2017-04-05
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2017-04-05
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-04
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-04
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0601
Huayi Li, Kenneth Butts, Kevin Zaseck, Dominic Liao-McPherson, Ilya Kolmanovsky
The development of advanced model-based engine control strategies, such as economic model predictive control (eMPC) for diesel engine fuel economy and emission optimization, requires accurate and low-complexity models for online prediction and controller validation. This paper presents the NOx and smoke emissions modeling of a light duty diesel engine equipped with a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) and a high pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. Such emission models can be integrated with an existing air path model into a complete engine mean value model (MVM), which can predict engine behavior at different operating conditions for controller design and validation before physical engine tests. The NOx and smoke emission models adopt an artificial neural network (ANN) approach with multi-layer perceptron (MLP) architectures. The networks are trained and validated using experimental data collected from engine bench tests.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0682
Yuedong Chao, Haifeng Lu, Zongjie Hu, Jun Deng, Zhijun Wu, Liguang Li, Yuan Shen, Shuang Yuan
In this paper comparisons were made between the fuel economy improvement by a High Pressure (HP) water-cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system and that by a Low Pressure (LP) water-cooled EGR system. Experiments were implemented on a 1.3-Litre turbocharged PFI gasoline engine from 1500rpm to 3000rpm and BMEP from 2bar to 14bar because of the relative narrow available range of HP-EGR system. In consideration of practical application of EGR system, the coolant used in this experiment was kept almost the same temperature as in real vehicles (88±3℃) instead of underground water temperature. The results indicated that, HP-EGR usually got higher best EGR rates for fuel economy at low-load region, and a better improvement (up to 2.96%) of fuel economy was expected. In contrast at moderate-to-high loads, especially at low speed high load region, HP-EGR rates were severely constrained by the application of turbo.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1016
Charles Schenk, Paul Dekraker
For the upcoming Midterm Evaluation of EPA’s 2017-2025 Light-Duty Vehicle greenhouse gas emissions regulation, EPA has been benchmarking engines and transmissions to generate inputs for use in its technology assessment. As part of the technology assessment, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (cEGR) and cylinder deactivation (CDA) were evaluated on an engine capable of running the Atkinson cycle. The base engine was a production 2.0L four cylinder engine with 75 degrees of intake phase authority and a 14:1 geometric compression ratio. An open ECU and cEGR hardware were installed on the engine so that the technology effectiveness could be evaluated. Once a steady state calibration was complete, two-cycle fuel economy estimates were made using fuel weighted modes and ALPHA (EPA’s full vehicle simulation model). Additionally, two cylinders were deactivated to determine what two-cycle fuel economy benefits could be achieved.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0683
Michael Fischer, Philipp Kreutziger, Yong Sun, Adam Kotrba
External EGR has been used on diesel engines for decades. It has also been used on gasoline engine in the past. It was recently reintroduced on gasoline engines to improve fuel economy at mid and high engine load conditions, where EGR can reduce fuel enrichment. Fuel enrichment causes fuel penalty and high soot particulate numbers, which will be limited by Europe RDE legislation from 2017 onwards. Under stoichiometric conditions, gasoline engines can be operated at high EGR rate (> 20%), but compared to diesel engines, it needs extreme cooling (~50°C) to gain the maximum fuel economy improvement. However, external EGR and its problems at low temperatures (fouling, corrosion & condensation) are well known . To avoid this, Tenneco introduced a coated Gasoline Particulate Filter in the EGR loop to clean the EGR gas by removing particulates, HC, NOx and CO. Only CO2, N2 and H2O will remain in the cleaned EGR.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0894
Nishant Singh
Improving fuel economy has been a key focus across automotive and truck industry for several years if not decades. In heavy duty commercial vehicles, the benefits from small gains in fuel economy lead to significant savings for fleets as well as owners and operators. Additionally, the regulations require vehicles to meet certain GHG levels which closely translate to vehicle fuel economy. For current state of the art FE technologies, incremental gains are so small that they are hard to measure on an actual vehicle. Engineers are challenged with high level of variability to make informed decisions. In such cases, highly controlled tests on Engine and Powertrain dynos are used, however, there is an associated variability even with these tests due factors such as part to part differences, fuel blends and quality, dyno control capabilities and so on.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0171
Quansheng Zhang, Yan Meng, Christopher Greiner, Ciro Soto, William Schwartz, Mark Jennings
In this paper, the tradeoff relationship between the Air Conditioning (A/C) system performance and vehicle fuel economy for a hybrid electric vehicle during the SC03 drive cycle is presented. First, an A/C system model was integrated into Ford’s HEV simulation environment. Then, a system-level sensitivity study was performed on a stand-alone A/C system simulator, by formulating a static optimization problem which minimizes the total energy use of actuators, and maintains an identical cooling capacity. Afterwards, a vehicle-level sensitivity study was conducted with all controllers incorporated in sensitivity analysis software, under three types of formulations of cooling capacity constraints. Finally, the common observation from both studies, that the compressor speed dominates the cooling capacity and the EDF fan has a marginal influence, is explained using the thermodynamics of a vapor compression cycle.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0640
Robert Wade, Steven Murphy, Paul Cross, Craig Hansen
The Variable Displacement Supercharger (VDS) is a twin helical screw style compressor that has a feature to change the compression ratio actively during vehicle operation. This device can reduce the parasitic losses associated with supercharging and improve the relative fuel economy of a supercharged engine. Supercharging is a boosting choice with several advantages over turbocharging. There is fast pressure delivery to the engine intake manifold for fast engine torque response and the fun to drive feel. The performance delivered by a supercharger can enable engine fuel economy actions like engine downsizing and downspeeding. The cost and difficulty of engineering hot exhaust components is eliminated with using only an air side compressor. Faster catalyst warm up can be achieved when not warming the turbine housing of a turbocharger.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1145
Eric De Hesselle, Mark Grozde, Raymond Adamski, Thomas Rolewicz, Mark Erazo
Hybrid electric vehicles are continuously challenged to meet cross attribute performance while minimizing energy usage and component cost in a very competitive automotive market. As electrified vehicles become more mainstream in the marketplace, the hybrid customers are expecting more attribute refinement in combination with the enhanced fuel economy benefits. Minimizing fuel consumption, which tends to drive hybrid powertrain engines to operate under lugging type calibrations, traditionally challenge NVH metrics. Balancing the design space to satisfy the cost metrics, energy efficiency, noise and vibration & drivability under the hybrid engine lugging conditions can be optimized through the use of multiple CAE tools. This paper describes how achieving NVH metrics can put undesirable boundaries on Powertrain Operation which could affect other performance attributes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0522
Jianning Zhao, Antonio Sciarretta
Fuel consumption is an essential factor that requires to be minimized in the design of a vehicle powertrain. Simple energy models can be of great help –- by clarifying the role of powertrain dimensioning parameters and reducing the computation time of complex routines aiming at optimizing these parameters. In this paper, a Fully Analytical fuel Consumption Estimation (FACE) is developed based on a novel GRaphical-Analysis-Based fuel Energy Consumption Optimization (GRAB-ECO), both of which predict the fuel consumption of light- and heavy-duty series hybrid-electric powertrains that is minimized by an optimal control technique. When a drive cycle and dimensioning parameters (e.g. vehicle road load, as well as rated power, torque, volume of engine, motor/generators, and battery) are considered as inputs, FACE predicts the minimal fuel consumption in closed form, whereas GRAB-ECO minimizes fuel consumption via a graphical analysis of vehicle optimal operating modes.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0136
Apostolos Karvountzis-Kontakiotis, Apostolos Pesiridis, Hua Zhao, Fuhaid Alshammari, Benjamin Franchetti, Ioannis Pesmazoglou, Lorenzo Tocci
Modern heavy duty diesel engines can well extend the goal of 50% brake thermal efficiency by utilizing waste heat recovery (WHR) technologies. The effect of an ORC WHR system on engine brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) is a compromise between the fuel penalty due to the higher exhaust backpressure and the additional power from the WHR system that is not attributed to fuel consumption. This work focuses on the fuel efficiency benefits of installing an ORC WHR system on a heavy duty diesel engine. A six cylinder, 7.25ℓ heavy duty diesel engine is employed to experimentally explore the effect of backpressure on fuel consumption. A zero-dimensional, detailed physical ORC model is utilized to predict ORC performance under design and off-design conditions.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1012
Sunil Kumar Pathak, Vineet sood, Yograj Singh, Salim Abbasbhai Channiwala
In developing countries like India, large numbers of portable gesnets are used as power source due to scarcity of grid power supply. The portable gensets, ranging fron 0.5 kW to 5 kw are very popular in the residential, small restaurants and shopping complexes. These gensets are using various fuels like gasoline, diesel, LPG and kerosene for small spark ignited and compression ignition engines and significant source of air pollution as these are running close to populated areas. Theses gensets are regulated by exhaust and noise emissions norms set by statutory bodies like central pollution control board of India. The gaseous emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbon (THC) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) are regulated and emission testing is performed as per three mode cycle as per standard test proecdure. The production gesnets are normally undergo a break in running to stabilize engine performance parameters mainly engine power output.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0606
Ashley Wiese, Anna Stefanopoulou, Julia Buckland, Amey Y. Karnik
Low-Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation (LP-EGR) has been shown to be an effective means of improving fuel economy and suppressing knock in downsized, boosted, spark ignition engines. LP-EGR is particularly beneficial at low-speed, high-load conditions, but can lead to combustion instability at lower loads. The transport delays inherent in LP-EGR systems slow the reduction of intake manifold EGR concentrations during tip-out events, which may lead to excessive EGR concentrations at low load. This paper explores leveraging Variable Valve Timing (VVT) as a means of improving the rate of reduction of intake manifold EGR concentration prior to tip-out. At higher boost levels, high valve overlap may result in intake manifold gas passing directly to the exhaust manifold. This short-circuiting behaviour could potentially improve EGR evacuation rates.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0150
Ankit Kumar Shukla, Raj Dhami, Aashish Bhargava, Sanjay Tiwari
In current landscape of commercial vehicle industry, fuel economy is one of the major parameter for fleet owner's profitability as well as greenhouse gasses emission. Less fuel efficiency results in more fuel consumption; use of conventional fuel in engines also makes environment polluted. The rapid growth in fuel cost, demands technologies that can improve fuel efficiency of vehicle. Phase change material (PCMs) for Thermal energy storage system (TES) is one of the specific technologies that not only can conserve energy to a large extent but also can reduce emission as well as dependency on convention fuel. There is a great variety of PCMs that can be used for extensive range of temperatures, making them attractive in a number of applications in automobiles. The objective of this paper is to study the behavior & performance of PCM based cooling system for automotive refrigerated containers over period from dispatch to delivery and at different ambient conditions (temperatures).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0154
Sudhi Uppuluri, Hemant R Khalane, Ajay Naiknaware
With the upcoming regulations for fuel economy and emissions, there is a significant interest among vehicle OEMs and fleet managers in developing computational methodologies to help understand the influence and interactions of various key parameters on Fuel Economy and carbon-di-oxide emissions. The analysis of the vehicle as a complete system enables designers to understand the local and global effects of various technologies that can be employed for fuel economy and emission improvement. In addition, there is a particular interest in not only quantifying the benefit over standard duty-cycles but also for real world driving conditions. This study looks at the impact of exhaust heat recovery system (EHRS) on a small passenger car in the India market with a 1.2L naturally aspirated gasoline engine. CSEG has developed a forward looking Simulink model of the passenger car in order to calculate the engine loading, engine heat rejection and the exhaust energy being generated.
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