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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2579
2018-06-07
Event
2018-05-22 ...
  • May 22-23, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Developing vehicles that achieve optimum fuel economy and acceleration performance is critical to the success of any automotive company, yet many practicing engineers have not received formal training on the broad range of factors which influence vehicle performance. This seminar provides this fundamental understanding through the development of mathematical models that describe the relevant physics and through the hands-on application of automotive test equipment. Attendees will also be introduced to software used to predict vehicle performance.
2018-03-20 ...
  • March 20-22, 2018 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • August 27-29, 2018 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Driven by the need for lower emissions, better fuel economy and improved drive quality, optimized powertrain calibrations are required for the many different vehicle configurations on today's roadways. While powertrain components such as the internal combustion engine, transmission, and hybrid electric powertrain are somewhat familiar to the automotive industry, the control theory, calibrations and system interactions between these components are a relatively unfamiliar aspect.
2017-11-14 ...
  • November 14-16, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2290
Zhixin Sun, Shaoqing Yang, Xinyong Qiao, Zhiyuan Zhang
Abstract When operating at high elevation of 3700m (atmospheric pressure about 68 kPa), the combustion process of diesel engine deteriorates, and the engine performance declines significantly. In this paper, Isooctyl Nitrate(EHN) is blended into the diesel fuel as additive to improve the combustion process. The decomposition of Isooctyl Nitrate(EHN) is analyzed and its mechanism is studied through chemical kinetics. A series of tests were carried out on a single cylinder diesel engine to study the effects of EHN on diesel engine combustion with the low intake pressure of 68kPa. Results show that the generation of OH、 H、 HO2 and H2O2 in n-heptane cleavage reactions can be promoted by EHN. In both stages of low and high temperature, the decomposition of n-heptane is accelerated, which shortened the ignition delay period. Four kinds of fuel are studied by tests: diesel fuel, diesel fuel with 0.3%, 0.6% and 0.9% mass fraction EHN respectively.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2346
Hong Liu, Jiajia Jin, Hongyu Li, Kazuo Yamamori, Toyoharu Kaneko, Minoru Yamashita, Liping Zhang
According to the Toyota gasoline engine oil requirements, this paper describes that the low viscosity engine oil of 0W-16 has been developed jointly by Sinopec and Toyota,which also conforms to the Toyota specification. As we know, the development of low viscosity gasoline engine oils should not only focus on fuel economy improvement, but shear stability and low speed pre-ignition (LSPI) prevention property should be taken into consideration. The main elements content in the formulation was determined according to the results of Toyota’s previous LSPI research and the initial 0W-16 engine oil had passed Toyota LSPI test. Based on all above, viscosity index improver (VII) with better friction reduction property was selected by the Mini-traction Machine (MTM) and the High-frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) tests.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2344
Robert Taylor, Hua Hu, Carl Stow, Tony Davenport, Robert Mainwaring, Scott Rappaport, Sarah Remmert
Abstract It is anticipated that worldwide energy demand will approximately double by 2050, whilst at the same time, CO2 emissions need to be halved. Therefore, there is increasing pressure to improve the efficiency of all machines, with great focus on improving the fuel efficiency of passenger cars. The use of downsized, boosted, gasoline engines, can lead to exceptional fuel economy, and on a well-to-wheels basis, can give similar CO2 emissions to electric vehicles (depending, of course, on how the electricity is generated). In this paper, the development of a low weight concept car is reported. The car is equipped with a three-cylinder 0.66 litre gasoline engine, and has achieved over 100 miles per imperial gallon, in real world driving conditions.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2349
Sarita Seth, Swamy Maloth, Prashant Kumar, Bhuvenesh Tyagi, Lokesh Kumar, Rajendra Mahapatra, Sarita Garg, Deepak Saxena, R Suresh, SSV Ramakumar
Abstract Automobile OEMs are looking for improving fuel economy[1,2] of their vehicles by reducing weight, rolling resistance and improving engine and transmission efficiency apart from the aerodynamic design. Fuel economy may be improved by using appropriate low viscosity [3] and use of friction reducers (FRs)[4,5] in the engine oils. The concept of high viscosity index [6] is being used for achieving right viscosity at required operating temperatures. In this paper performance properties of High Viscosity Index engine oils have been compared with conventional VI engine oils. Efforts have been made to check the key differentiation in oil properties w.r.t. low temperature fluidity, high temperature high shear viscosity/deposits, friction behavior, oxidation performance in bench tribological /engine/chassis dyno tests which finally lead to oil performance assessment.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2464
Xinyou Lin, Chaoyu Wu, Qingxiang Zheng, Liping Mo, Hailin Li
The Range-extended electric vehicle (RE-EV) is a complex nonlinear system. The control strategy of REEV can be affected by numerous parameters. Firstly, the Multiple Operation Points (MOP) control strategy is proposed based on operation features of the RE-EV and combining with the optimal efficiency region of the engine. The switching logic rules of MOP strategy are designed for the desired operation mode transition, which makes the engine running at high efficiency region. Then,GA(Genetic algorithm) is implemented to search the optimal solution. The fuel consumption is defined as the target cost function. The demand power of engine is defined as optimal variable. The SOC (State of Charge) and speed are selected as the state variables. The dynamic performance of vehicle and cycling life of battery is set as the constraints. The optimal switching parameters combination is obtained based on this control strategy.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2354
Dave Horstman, John Sparrow
Abstract Due to recent legislation on CO2 emissions, Heavy Duty engine and vehicle manufacturers and their suppliers have had an increased interest in improving vehicle fuel economy. Many aspects are being investigated including vehicle aerodynamics, tire rolling resistance, waste heat recovery, engine fuel efficiency, and others. Crankcase oils offer a cost-effective mechanism to reduce engine friction and increase engine fuel efficiency. The potential gains realized by optimized fuel-efficient oils are relatively small, usually less than 3%. Therefore, in order to develop these oils, formulators must have a robust, repeatable, and realistic test method for differentiation. To serve Light Duty (LD) engines, this need has been partially satisfied by the development of what became the Sequence VI engine test for gasoline passenger car oils in the early 1990’s.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2435
Jian Ji, BoZhou He, Lei Yuan
Abstract It is well-known that, compared with automatic transmissions (ATs), continuously variable transmission (CVT) shows advantages in fuel saving due to its continuous shift manner, since this feature enables the engine to operate in the efficiency-optimized region. However, as the AT gear number increases and the ratio gap narrows, this advantage of CVT is challenged. In this paper, a comparative study on fuel economy for a CVT based vehicle and a 9-speed automatic transmission (AT) based vehicle is proposed. The features of CVT and AT are analyzed and ratio control strategies for both the CVT and 9-speed AT based vehicles are designed from the view point of vehicle fuel economy, respectively. For the 9-speed AT, an optimal gear shift map is constructed. With this gear shift map, the optimal gear is selected as vehicle velocity and driving condition vary.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2355
Yungwan Kwak, Christopher Cleveland
Abstract Due to its simplicity and fuel economy benefit, continuously variable transmission (CVT) technology has gained a lot of attention in recent years. Market penetration of CVT technology is increasing rapidly compared to step-type automatic transmission technology. OEMs, Tier 1 suppliers, and lubricant suppliers are working to further improve the fuel economy benefit of CVTs. As a lubricant supplier, we want to understand the effects of fluid properties on CVT fuel economy (FE). We have formulated fluids that had KV100 ranges from 2-4 cSt to 7-9 cSt with various types and viscosities of base oils. Wide ranges of viscosity indexes, steel-on-steel friction, and other properties were tested. Full vehicle fuel economy tests were performed in a temperature controlled environment with a robotic driver. The test revealed that there was more than 3% overall FE variation compared to a reference fluid.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2224
Paul Freeland, Gareth Jones, Rong-Sheih Chen, Liang-Wei Huang, Marwan El-Kassem, Roland Kaiser
REVISED ABASTRACT 4/7/2017 The challenges of maintaining continuous improvements in air quality, manage the earth’s energy resources, and to control atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses, whilst supplying ever increasing global sales volumes mean that ever more detailed understanding and optimisation of powertrain systems is required. Downsizing, electrification and traffic flow management all have very important parts to play in achieving these goals, but can still only modify the outputs of the basic propulsion units, and methods to improve the efficiency, cleanliness and flexibility of powertrains remains a vital development requirement. The paper explores the fuel consumption benefits available from de-throttling technologies that can help to bring gasoline engine efficiency on a par with that of diesel engines.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2232
Liming Cao, Ho Teng, Ruigang Miao, Xuwei Luo, Tingjun Hu, Xianlong Huang
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2245
Xianlin Ouyang, Ho Teng, Xiaochun zeng, Xuwei Luo, Tingjun Hu, Xianlong Huang, Jiankun Luo, Yongli Zhou
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2246
Xuwei Luo, Ho Teng, Yuxing Lin, Bin Li, Xiaochun Zeng, Tingjun Hu, Xianlong Huang, Xiaojun Yuan
Atkinson cycle realized with a late intake valve closing (LIVC) and Miller cycle achieved with an early intake valve closing (EIVC) have been recognized as effective approaches for improving the gasoline engine fuel economy. In both Atkinson and Miller cycles, the engine can be designed with a higher geometric compression ratio for increasing the expansion work and the effective compression ratio is governed by the intake valve close (IVC) timing for the knock control. Duration of the intake event and IVC timing affect not only the pumping loss during the gas exchange, but also have strong influences on the friction torques of the intake cams and the turbulence intensities for the in-cylinder charge motion. The latter governs duration of combustion and EGR tolerance, both of which have impacts on the engine thermal efficiency.
2017-10-08
Journal Article
2017-01-2348
Michael Clifford Kocsis, Peter Morgan, Alexander Michlberger, Ewan E. Delbridge, Oliver Smith
Abstract Increasingly stringent fuel economy and emissions regulations around the world have forced the further optimization of nearly all vehicle systems. Many technologies exist to improve fuel economy; however, only a smaller sub-set are commercially feasible due to the cost of implementation. One system that can provide a small but significant improvement in fuel economy is the lubrication system of an internal combustion engine. Benefits in fuel economy may be realized by the reduction of engine oil viscosity and the addition of friction modifying additives. In both cases, advanced engine oils allow for a reduction of engine friction. Because of differences in engine design and architecture, some engines respond more to changes in oil viscosity or friction modification than others. For example, an engine that is designed for an SAE 0W-16 oil may experience an increase in fuel economy if an SAE 0W-8 is used.
2017-10-08
Technical Paper
2017-01-2208
Tao Liu, Ziwang Lu, Guangyu Tian
Abstract To further explore the potential of fuel economy for hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a methodology of demand power optimization is proposed. The fuel consumption depends not only on the EMS, but also on the way to operate vehicle. A control strategy to adjust driver’s demand before power splitting is necessary. To get accurate and reliable control strategy, two aspects are the most important. First, a rigorous and organized modeling approach is a base to describe complicated powertrain system of HEV. The energetic macroscopic representation (EMR) is a graphical synthetic description of electromechanical conversion system based on energy flow. A powertrain architecture of HEV is described explicitly via the EMR. Second, the effectiveness of EMS and the reasonability of driving operations are vital.
2017-08-11
Journal Article
2017-01-9379
John Thomas, Shean Huff, Brian West, Paul Chambon
Abstract Aggressive driving is an important topic for many reasons, one of which is higher energy used per unit distance traveled, potentially accompanied by an elevated production of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Examining a large data set of self-reported fuel economy (FE) values revealed that the dispersion of FE values is quite large and is larger for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) than for conventional gasoline vehicles. This occurred despite the fact that the city and highway FE ratings for HEVs are generally much closer in value than for conventional gasoline vehicles. A study was undertaken to better understand this and better quantify the effects of aggressive driving, including reviewing past aggressive driving studies, developing and exercising a new vehicle energy model, and conducting a related experimental investigation.
2017-08-04
Magazine
Opposed-piston engines: the powerplant of the future India's dream of an all-EV fleet by 2030: Myth, miracle, or reality? An approach for prediction of motorcycle engine noise under combustion load Innovations for lightweighting Tough U.S. fuel-economy bogies for 2021 and beyond are driving new approaches for materials, as seen in these examples. More intelligence equals more efficiency, enhanced functionality Advanced electronic systems require renewed focus on architectures, processors, sensors and networks. Connected commercial vehicles bring cybersecurity to the fore Connectivity, automation and electrification will drive vehicle development in the near future, say industry experts attending the revamped SAE COMVEC 17 event.
2017-08-03
Magazine
Collaborating on diesel emission control Stringent fuel-efficiency and criteria-pollutant standards call for new combustion strategies. The SwRI-led Advanced Combustion Catalyst and Aftertreatment Technologies consortium reinvents existing technologies and experiments with new catalysts to meet standards. More intelligence equals more efficiency, enhanced functionality Advanced systems require renewed focus on architectures, processors, sensors and networks. Appraising the potential for platooning in the U.S. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory perform statistical analysis based on a large collection of real-world U.S. truck usage data to estimate the fraction of total miles that are technically suitable for platooning. Connected commercial vehicles bring cybersecurity to the fore Connectivity, automation and electrification will largely drive vehicle developments in the coming years, according to experts presenting at the revamped SAE COMVEC 17.
2017-07-10
Technical Paper
2017-28-1921
Jyotirmoy Barman
Abstract Engine down speeding is rapidly picking up momentum in many segment of world market. Numerous engine down speeding packages from OEM have been tailored to take advantage of the increased efficiencies associated with engine down speeding. Running engine at lower rpm has numerous advantages. The most obvious of these is reduced fuel consumption, since the engine can spend more time running within its optimum efficiency range. By down speeding, the engine is made to run at low speeds and with high torques. For the same power, the engine is operated at higher specific load- Brake Mean Effective pressure (BMEP) which results in higher efficiency and reduced fuel consumption-Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). The reasons for increased fuel efficiency are reduced engine friction due to low piston speeds, reduced relative heat transfer and increased thermodynamic efficiency.
2017-06-29
Journal Article
2017-01-9279
Davide Di Battista, Roberto Cipollone
Abstract The use of reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICE) dominates the sector of the on-road transportation, both for passengers and freight. CO2 reduction is the present technological driver, considering the major worldwide greenhouse reduction targets committed by most governments in the western world. In the near future (2020) these targets will require a significant reduction with respect to today’s goals, reinforcing the importance of reducing fuel consumption. In ICEs more than one third of the fuel energy used is rejected into the environment as thermal waste through exhaust gases. Therefore, a greater fuel economy could be achieved if this energy is recovered and converted into useful mechanical or electrical power on board. For long haul vehicles, which run for hundreds of thousands of miles per year at relatively steady conditions, this recovery appears especially worthy of attention.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2579

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