Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 2427
2015-10-04
Event
This session is looking for abstracts that are focused around what effect designing a vehicle that optimizes fuel economy with minimum environmental impact has on creating an optimized braking system efficiency. Can this be done or does something have to give?
2015-08-18 ...
  • August 18-19, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • November 2-3, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2015-06-04
Event
2015-06-03 ...
  • June 3-5, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • December 9-11, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2015-04-21
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2015-04-19
Event
2015-04-19
Event
Lugo presents a new variable stroke engine that in addition to being a true mechanical Atkinson cycle, with shorter intake/compression strokes and longer expansion/exhaust strokes (with all the benefits associated with this cycle), also provides an unprecedented positive torque between 15º before Top Dead Center (TDC) and TDC. In this engine, all combustion events that take place in that interval become positive torque and not engine-damaging activities. This feature is considered to be a potential key to making Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) a commercial reality. Lugo provides the engine design engineer with an Atkinson cycle, a full 15º before TDC to implement HCCI ignition strategies and the possibility of compression ratios greater than 17:1. The Lugo engine technology consists mainly of adding a fixed pinion gear and a crown cam to each cylinder of the engine.
2015-04-19
Event
Fuel consumption continues to be a key focus area for on-highway trucks. Not only does it directly affect the bottom line for the customer, but it is also relevant in the context of current and future Green House Gas regulations. Truck fuel economy is impacted by a number of factors including aerodynamics, rolling resistance, duty cycles, driver habits, as well as engine and overall powertrain efficiency. Building blocks towards improved engine and powertrain efficiency will be discussed as part of this presentation.
2015-04-19
Event
In 2012 energy consumption by light-duty vehicles (LDVs) accounted for 61% of all transportation energy consumption in the United States, or 8.4 million barrels of oil equivalent per day. Future light-duty corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards will serve to reduce US petroleum demand, but in order to achieve further GHG emissions reductions, significant improvements in real-world engine fuel efficiency must be achieved. ARPA-E is investigating the potential for a research program in the area of high efficiency light-duty automotive engines employing technologies beyond those anticipated in the 2025 timeframe.
2015-04-19
Event
To cope with future stringent CO2 emission regulations, further engine evolution is required. Internal combustion engine still remains much room for the fuel economy improvement. Mazda has been working on further fuel economy improvement by focusing on seven main control factors. This presentation provides the future steps to close to the ideal internal combustion engines. As an example of control factors, heat transfer to wall is focused and some application to be shown by CAE and experimental analysis.
2015-04-19
Event
The most significant technology trend with future Gasoline engines is the increasing application of turbocharged GDI. For mainstream TGDI the power ranges between 65-95 kW/l, BMEP between 17- 25 bar and a minimum BSFC around 230-240 g/kWh. In future, this range will be significantly extended. AVL already demonstrated 168 kW/l in a demo car and 200 kW/l is under development. Miller/Atkinson cycle plus high compression ratio and cooled EGR enable a 200 g/kWh BSFC level, however, compromise full load performance. To obtain both high power and high efficiency, variable valve lift and variable compression ratio have to be combined.
2015-04-19
Event
While lean operation in spark ignition engines has previously demonstrated the ability to increase thermal efficiency, the degree of enleanment capability of the system is limited by increasingly unstable combustion in the lean region. Turbulent Jet Ignition (TJI) is a pre-chamber-based combustion system that extends this lean limit beyond the capabilities of modern light duty spark ignition engines. In the present study, the thermal efficiency improvement pathways of the system are explored through an examination of experimental results. Corresponding simulation results describe the mechanics of TJI. Finally, the applicability of the concept as a high efficiency engine technology is discussed.
2015-04-19
Event
Current regulations and market demands are driving the pursuit of clean, high-efficiency engine technology. In light duty markets dominated by gasoline powered vehicles (like the U.S.), advanced combustion strategies that use commercially available gasoline are highly prized. Gasoline Compression Ignition (GCI) is a promising path to higher efficiency gasoline engines by combining the efficiency advantages of diesel engines with the emissions friendliness of gasoline. Recent work suggests that GCI technology can span the entire engine speed/load range, provide high efficiency and ultra-low emissions. Progress on developing strategies to enhance the robustness and performance of GCI technology will be discussed.
2015-04-19
Event
Well-mixed lean SI engine operation can provide efficiency improvements of the fuel economy relative to that of traditional well-mixed stoichiometric SI operation. However, the realized gains depend on the ability to ensure both stable and complete combustion. In this work, several enabling techniques are compared using performance testing in combination with plasma and flame imaging. Specifically, multi-pulse transient plasma ignition is compared to a conventional high-energy inductive spark ignition system. Combined effects of fuel type (gasoline or E85) and intake-gas preheating are examined. Lastly, the effects of dilution type (air or EGR) on lean stability limits are clarified. The largest efficiency improvement was found for lean gasoline operation using intake preheating, showing a 20% fuel-economy improvement relative to traditional non-dilute stoichiometric operation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0979
Chih Feng Lee, Per Öberg
Road type and driving behaviour have direct influence on the fuel economy, therefore accurate determination of these factors are desirable. Ideally, road types can be determined exactly if there is access to a comprehensive road map data, while driving behaviour can be precisely assessed if there is extensive data available on the environment and driver. However, these approaches are not always realisable due to limited access of measurement data. Consequently, classification methods for drive type and driving style with different requirements of measurement data are desirable. Many classification methods for drive type and driving style have been proposed in the literature. However, there is a shortage of direct comparison between these methods using the same data. Furthermore, requirements of measurement for the classification methods are rarely discussed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0974
Aaron Brooker, Jeffrey Gonder, Sean Lopp, Jacob Ward
The ADOPT model is a light duty vehicle consumer choice and stock model supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office. It estimates technology improvement impacts on U.S. light duty vehicles sales, petroleum use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. The ADOPT model uses a logit function to estimate sales. The majority of existing vehicle makes, models, and trims are included to fully represent the market. The logit function estimates their sales based on key attributes including vehicle price, fuel cost, acceleration, range and usable volume. The average importance of several attributes changes nonlinearly across its range, and changes with income. For several attributes, a distribution of importance around the average value is used to represent consumer heterogeneity. Engine downsizing and balancing net incentives/penalties are used to ensure that the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is met.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0977
Naveen Sridharan
In a pursuit towards improving the fuel efficiency and partial zero emission, the paper shall be confined to optimize exhaust systems to have a reduced Back Pressure (BP) output. This objective is achieved by an experimental study and to reduce the huge number of iterations, Design of Experiments (DOE) technique is used which shall pave way for reduced number of experimental analysis on different setups of exhaust systems. Results are achieved using Flow Analysis-Flow Lab and Engine Lab with constant inlet mass flow rate and inlet temperature (engine conditions). This methodology shall give a direct behavior of different exhaust setups for the same engine conditions and the exhaust system setup that achieves the most reduced BP output shall be chosen as the optimized assembly.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0980
Katsuya Minami, Yasuhiro Yoshimi
Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) is one of the promising solutions for future transportation. Hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) is originally characterized by better fuel economy in comparison with conventional vehicles based on gasoline and diesel engine. However, in recent years, customers are becoming to expect the additional merits for environmentally friendly vehicle such as vehicle acceleration and dynamics. Moreover, electric range is a major concern of PHEV and significantly affects the vehicle architecture including battery capacity, power and vehicle weight. This study aims to build a comprehensive simulation used at the early stage of PHEV development. This simulation enables to design vehicle concept and fundamental architecture with regard to fuel economy, vehicle acceleration and electric range.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1145
Darrell Robinette, Daniel Wehrwein
This investigation utilizes energy analysis and statistical methods to optimize the design parameters of an automatic transmission and assess fuel consumption performance with a prescribed amount of variation in parasitic loss. A generalized factorial experiment is undertaken to determine the optimal combination of transmission design parameters for fuel consumption and acceleration performance across widely varying vehicle platforms and engine types. The design parameters considered are the number of fixed gear ratios, launch gear ratio, top gear ratio and ratio step size progression. For a single vehicle platform with multiple engines and the optimized transmission as determined from the generalized factorial experiment, a Monte Carlo simulation was used to explore the range of fuel consumption to be expected for multiple distributions of parasitic losses that could be typical of various production tolerances.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0978
Lori Lemazurier, Neeraj Shidore, Namdoo Kim, Ayman Moawad, Aymeric Rousseau, Phillip Bonkoski, Jeremy Delhom
Near term advances in SI engine technology (VVL, GDI, cylinder deactivation, turbo downsizing) for passenger vehicles hold promise of significant fuel savings in the vehicles of the immediate future. Similarly, trends in transmissions indicate higher gear numbers (8 speed, 9 speed), higher spans and a focus on down-speeding to improve engine efficiency. Dual clutch transmissions exhibit higher efficiency than the traditional automatics, and are being introduced in the light duty vehicle segment worldwide. Another development with low investment and immediate benefits has been the adaptation of start-stop (idle engine stop) technology in vehicles today. This paper evaluates the impact of each of these technologies (engines, transmissions, start stop) on the fuel economy and performance of a compact car in the year 2020 through the use of vehicle system simulation.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0982
Brandon D. Biller, Philip Wetzel, Pavan Chandras, Sean Keidel
Several diesel passenger car boosting systems were studied to assess their impact on vehicle performance and fuel economy. A baseline 1.5L diesel engine model with a single VGT turbocharger was obtained through Gamma Technologies’ fast running model library. This model was modified to explore multiple two stage boosting systems to represent the anticipated architecture of future engines. A series sequential turbocharged configuration and a series turbocharger-supercharger configuration were evaluated. The torque curves were increased from that of the original engine model to take advantage of the increased performance offered by two stage boosting. The peak cylinder pressure for all models was limited to 180 bar. Drive cycle analysis over the WLTP was performed using these engine architectures, while assessing the sensitivity to various system parameters. These parameters include: vehicle weight and aerodynamic drag, EGR target maps, level of downspeeding, and turbocharger inertia.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2427

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: