Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 2561
2017-06-08
Event
2017-06-06 ...
  • June 6-8, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 14-16, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2017-05-22 ...
  • May 22-23, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Developing vehicles that achieve optimum fuel economy and acceleration performance is critical to the success of any automotive company, yet many practicing engineers have not received formal training on the broad range of factors which influence vehicle performance. This seminar provides this fundamental understanding through the development of mathematical models that describe the relevant physics and through the hands-on application of automotive test equipment. Attendees will also be introduced to software used to predict vehicle performance.
2017-05-04 ...
  • May 4-5, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • October 17-18, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Shanghai, China
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized.
2017-04-06
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-05
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2017-04-05
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-05
Event
The focus of this session is the performance of integrated vehicle systems and the influence of driving styles and drive cycles on fuel consumption/economy. This will include how integration of vehicle components such as the powertrain, parasitics, accessories, mass elements, aerodynamics, tires, brakes, and hubs affect the overall vehicle energy and energy conversion efficiency.
2017-04-04
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-04
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1563
Abhijeet Behera, Murugan Sivalingam
Abstract Two and three wheeler vehicles are largely used in many developing and under developing countries because of their lower cost, better fuel economy and easy handling. Although, the construction of them is simpler than the four wheeler vehicle, they pose some problems related to instability. Wobbling is the main cause of instabilities in two wheeler and three wheeler vehicles. In this study, a mathematical model was proposed and developed to determine wobble instability of a two wheeler. Nonlinear equations were formulated by using kinematics and the D’Alembert’s principle with the help of multi body formalism. The non-linear equations found in the study were linearized with respect to rectilinear and upright motion, considering no rolling. It led to formation of matrix. The real part of the Eigen value of the matrix was found to be negative, implication of whose was an asymptotic stable motion.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1297
Robert Peckham, Sumit Basu, Marcelo Ribeiro, Sandra Walker
Abstract This study emphasizes the fact that there lies value and potential savings in harmonizing some of the inherent differences between the USA, EU, and China regulations with respect to the role of vehicle mass and lightweighting within Fuel Economy (FE) and Green House Gas (GHG) regulations. The definition and intricacies of FE and mass regulations for the three regions (USA, EU, and China) have been discussed and compared. In particular, the nuances of footprint-based, curb-mass-based, and stepped-mass-based regulations that lead to the differences have been discussed. Lightweighting is a customer benefit for fuel consumption, but in this work, we highlight cases where lightweighting, as a CO2 enabler, has incentives that do not align with rational customer values. A typical vehicle’s FE performance sensitivity to a change in mass on the standard regional certification drive cycles is simulated and compared across the three regions.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0599
Yichao Guo
Abstract Misfire is generally defined as be no or partial combustion during the power stroke of internal combustion engine. Because a misfired engine will dramatically increase the exhaust emission and potentially cause permanent damage to the catalytic converters, California Air Resources Board (CARB), as well as most of other countries’ on-board diagnostic regulations mandates the detection of misfire. Currently almost all the OEMs utilize crankshaft position sensors as the main input to their misfire detection algorithm. The detailed detection approaches vary among different manufacturers. For example, some chooses the crankshaft angular velocity calculated from the raw output of the crankshaft positon sensor as the measurement to distinguish misfires from normal firing events, while others use crankshaft angular acceleration or the associated torque index derived from the crankshaft position sensor readings as the measurement of misfire detection.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1513
Young-Chang Cho, Chin-Wei Chang, Andrea Shestopalov, Edward Tate
Abstract The airflow into the engine bay of a passenger car is used for cooling down essential components of the vehicle, such as powertrain, air-conditioning compressor, intake charge air, batteries, and brake systems, before it returns back to the external flow. When the intake ram pressure becomes high enough to supply surplus cooling air flow, this flow can be actively regulated by using arrays of grille shutters, namely active grille shutters (AGS), in order to reduce the drag penalty due to excessive cooling. In this study, the operation of AGS for a generic SUV-type model vehicle is optimized for improved fuel economy on a highway drive cycle (part of SFTP-US06) by using surrogate models. Both vehicle aerodynamic power consumption and under-hood cooling performance are assessed by using PowerFLOW, a high-fidelity flow solver that is fully coupled with powertrain heat exchanger models.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-1535
Luca Dalessio, Bradley Duncan, Chinwei Chang, Joaquin Ivan Gargoloff, Ed Tate
Abstract The ultimate goal for vehicle aerodynamicists is to develop vehicles that perform well on the road under real-world conditions. One of the most important metrics to evaluate vehicle performance is the drag coefficient. However, vehicle development today is performed mostly under controlled settings using wind tunnels and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with artificially uniform upstream conditions, neglecting real-world effects due to road turbulence from wind and other vehicles. Thus, the drag coefficients computed with these methods might not be representative of the real performance of the car on the road. This might ultimately lead engineers to develop design solutions and aerodynamic devices which, while performing well in idealized conditions, do not perform well on the road. For this reason, it is important to assess the vehicle’s drag as seen in real-world environments. An effort in this direction is represented by using the wind-averaged drag.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0184
Miyoko Oiwake, Ozeki Yoshiichi, Sogo Obata, Hideaki Nagano, Itsuhei Kohri
Abstract In order to develop various parts and components for hybrid electric vehicles, understanding the effect of their structure and thermal performance on their fuel consumption and cruising distance is essential. However, this essential information is generally not available to suppliers of vehicle parts and components. In this report, following a previous study of electric vehicles, a simple method is proposed as the first step to estimate the algorithm of the energy transmission and then the cruising performance for hybrid electric vehicles. The proposed method estimates the cruising performance using only the published information given to suppliers, who, in general, are not supplied with more detailed information. Further, an actual case study demonstrating application of the proposed method is also discussed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0232
Nizar Khemri, Hao Ying, Joseph Supina, Fazal Syed
Abstract Realistic vehicle fuel economy studies require real-world vehicle driving behavior data along with various factors affecting the fuel consumption. Such studies require data with various vehicles usages for prolonged periods of time. A project dedicated to collecting such data is an enormous and costly undertaking. Alternatively, we propose to utilize two publicly available vehicle travel survey data sets. One is Puget Sound Travel Survey collected using GPS devices in 484 vehicles between 2004 and 2006. Over 750,000 trips were recorded with a 10-second time resolution. The data were obtained to study travel behavior changes in response to time-and-location-variable road tolling. The other is Atlanta Regional Commission Travel Survey conducted for a comprehensive study of the demographic and travel behavior characteristics of residents within the study area.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0171
Quansheng Zhang, Yan Meng, Christopher Greiner, Ciro Soto, William Schwartz, Mark Jennings
Abstract In this paper, the tradeoff relationship between the Air Conditioning (A/C) system performance and vehicle fuel economy for a hybrid electric vehicle during the SC03 drive cycle is presented. First, an A/C system model was integrated into Ford’s HEV simulation environment. Then, a system-level sensitivity study was performed on a stand-alone A/C system simulator, by formulating a static optimization problem which minimizes the total energy use of actuators, and maintains an identical cooling capacity. Afterwards, a vehicle-level sensitivity study was conducted with all controllers incorporated in sensitivity analysis software, under three types of formulations of cooling capacity constraints. Finally, the common observation from both studies, that the compressor speed dominates the cooling capacity and the EDF fan has a marginal influence, is explained using the thermodynamics of a vapor compression cycle.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0892
Eric Wood, Jeffrey Gonder, Forrest Jehlik
Abstract On-road fuel economy is known to vary significantly between individual trips in real-world driving conditions. This work introduces a methodology for rapidly simulating a specific vehicle’s fuel economy over the wide range of real-world conditions experienced across the country. On-road test data collected using a highly instrumented vehicle is used to refine and validate this modeling approach. Model accuracy relative to on-road data collection is relevant to the estimation of “off-cycle credits” that compensate for real-world fuel economy benefits that are not observed during certification testing on a chassis dynamometer.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0897
Gregory Pannone, Brian Betz, Michael Reale, John Thomas
Abstract1
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0382
Oscar Hernandez Cervantes, Antonio Espiritu Santo Rincon
Abstract The development of an automatic control system for a towing dynamometer used for testing is described in this paper. The process involved the deployment of new power electronics circuit boards, a TELMA retarder, instrumentation and a human machine interface (HMI) achieved through an open source platform. The purpose of this platform is to have a low cost system that allows further function development, data acquisition and communication with other devices. This system is intended as a novel solution that will allow closed loop and automated tests integrated with PCM data for engine calibration. It is projected to be part of a flexible calibration system with direct communication to the interfaces used during development (ATI, ETAS), which will be used to achieve lean test and development schedules.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0425
Hong Wang, Yanjun Huang, Chen Lv, Amir Khajepour
Abstract Energy management strategies greatly influence the power performance and fuel economy of series hybrid electric tracked bulldozers. In this paper, we present a procedure for the design of a power management strategy by defining a cost function, in this case, the minimization of the vehicle’s fuel consumption over a driving cycle. To explore the fuel-saving potential of a series hybrid electric tracked bulldozer, a dynamic programming (DP) algorithm is utilized to determine the optimal control actions for a series hybrid powertrain, and this can be the benchmark for the assessment of other control strategies. The results from comparing the DP strategy and the rule-based control strategy indicate that this procedure results in approximately a 7% improvement in fuel economy.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0606
Ashley Wiese, Anna Stefanopoulou, Julia Buckland, Amey Y. Karnik
Abstract Low-Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation (LP-EGR) has been shown to be an effective means of improving fuel economy and suppressing knock in downsized, boosted, spark ignition engines. LP-EGR is particularly beneficial at low-speed, high-load conditions, but can lead to combustion instability at lower loads. The transport delays inherent in LP-EGR systems slow the reduction of intake manifold EGR concentrations during tip-out events, which may lead to excessive EGR concentrations at low load. This paper explores leveraging Variable Valve Timing (VVT) as a means of improving the rate of reduction of intake manifold EGR concentration prior to tip-out. At higher boost levels, high valve overlap may result in intake manifold gas passing directly to the exhaust manifold. This short-circuiting behaviour could potentially improve EGR evacuation rates.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2561

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: