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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2404
Event
2015-06-04
Training / Education
2015-03-10
Driven by the need for lower emissions, better fuel economy and improved drive quality, optimized powertrain calibrations are required for the many different vehicle configurations on today's roadways. While powertrain components such as the internal combustion engine, transmission, and hybrid electric powertrain are somewhat familiar to the automotive industry, the control theory, calibrations and system interactions between these components are a relatively unfamiliar aspect. This web seminar will introduce participants to the concepts behind optimized powertrain calibrations and how they impact fuel consumption, exhaust emissions, and vehicle performance.
Training / Education
2014-12-03
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%. This web seminar will explore turbocharging for gasoline and diesel (heavy and light duty) engines, including the fundamentals of turbocharging, design features, performance measures, and matching and selection criteria.
Event
2014-11-06
With the increased demands for fuel efficiency and fuel economy, the internal combustion engine (ICE) continues to be examined for design improvements to improve these measures. It is projected that OEMs and suppliers will continue to optimize the ICE at least through 2020. Focusing on the near- and long-term role of the ICE in advanced vehicles and highlighting this accelerating development and calibration; high efficiency combustion and controls; advances in turbo machinery, valve technology or ignition systems; and emission control challenges. Overall, the program may examine several technological advances required to maximize efficiency, including: • Advanced, low-temperature combustion techniques • Improved understanding and modeling of heat loss mechanisms • Electrification and intelligent control of accessory loads • Possible redesign of mechanical systems (e.g., variable stroke for fully expanded cycles) • High-efficiency turbo-machinery to extract exhaust energy and provide boost Emissions, Monitoring, Measurement, Control and Energy Savings Strategies for the Future.
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
An overview of the European Emissions Regulations is given and the challenges imposed by the more stringent requirements are identified. Emphasis is given on the development of Emissions Regulations starting from Euro 4 and their effects on the automotive industry. Technologies and regulations used and envisaged to reduce CO2 emissions are also discussed together with their trade-offs with pollution reduction measures.
Event
2014-11-06
Event
2014-11-06
The internal combustion engine will continue to be integral to the transportation of people and goods for the foreseeable future. To reduce environmental impact and improve energy security, many nations are enacting new aggressive fuel economy and emissions standards which are pushing the development of new engine technologies on an unprecedented scale. These new technologies coupled with advances in sensors and onboard computers will enable real-world implementations of new combustion concepts as well as new fuel pathways that blend the best characteristics of spark-ignition and compress-ignition engines for maximum efficiency with lowest possible emissions. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has several ongoing activities exploring the intersection of fuel chemistry and advanced combustion processes including reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion, gasoline partially premixed combustion (PPC), and the use of in-cylinder thermo-chemical reforming (TCR) to compensate fuel-specific differences on the combustion process.
Event
2014-11-06
Uniform provisions concerning) to the approval of Retrofit Emission Control Devices (REC) and to increasing numbers of cities with clean air programs.
Event
2014-11-06
Combustion simulations and single cylinder engine tests show a clear potential when coupling the Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) engine with the Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) technologies.
Event
2014-11-05
Tightening vehicle emission regulations requires additional technology. New technologies, including aerodynamic aids and emissions control systems, add significant weight to vehicles. Meanwhile freight logistics managers are looking for increased freight efficiency through lighter vehicles to increase payload. This discussion will focus on the benefits of switching to aluminum wheels as an easy-to-implement solution to lower overall vehicle weight and increase freight efficiency with added benefits of improved ride, increased tire wear and lower maintenance cost. In addition, the discussion will cover other light weight aluminum component usage to further lower vehicle weight to achieve emission and fuel efficiency improvement.
Event
2014-11-05
The scale of China’s auto industry has been firmly held the first in the world; its volume reached 22 million in 2013 and further growth is predictable as well. While, the constraints to China’s auto industry are becoming more obvious, among them the energy issue is an especially challenging one to the country. This leads to a stricter CAFC regulation in China--its standard of 5.0L/100km in 2020 is quite hard to be fulfilled. The energy-efficient technologies would thus be one of the core competences for enterprises. In this presentation, the maturity, potential and prospect of technologies, the law-conformance and the consumer-cognition will be discussed in detail.
Event
2014-11-05
The scale of China’s auto industry has been firmly held the first in the world; its volume reached 22 million in 2013 and further growth is predictable as well. While, the constraints to China’s auto industry are becoming more obvious, among them the energy issue is an especially challenging one to the country. This leads to a stricter CAFC regulation in China--its standard of 5.0L/100km in 2020 is quite hard to be fulfilled. The energy-efficient technologies would thus be one of the core competences for enterprises. In this presentation, the maturity, potential and prospect of technologies, the law-conformance and the consumer-cognition will be discussed in detail.
Event
2014-11-05
Despite an impressive array of technology advances, the basic operation of the automobile has not changed much over the past 120 years. Vehicles continue to be largely energized by petroleum, powered by internal combustion engines, and controlled via mechanical linkages. However, given society’s concerns related to energy, environment, safety, congestion, and affordability, one must question whether the continued evolution of traditional automotive technologies will enable sustainable personal mobility. Fortunately, new and more revolutionary automotive technologies are at hand, which will allow the industry to address the issues currently associated with automobiles. These developments include electrification of the propulsion system, advanced electronics and vehicle controls, new telematics and connected vehicle capabilities, lightweight and advanced materials, and energy-efficient, environmentally friendly manufacturing processes.
Event
2014-11-05
Event
2014-11-05
Event
2014-11-05
Standards for reducing emissions and increasing fuel efficiencies are creating a need for OEMs to develop lighter vehicles to achieve these requirements. This Forum has been designed to provide automobile manufacturers and suppliers the latest advances in manufacturing strategies, design and materials selection strategies to promote lighter weight, higher performing, fuel efficient vehicles without sacrificing safety or performance. It will feature presentations on the latest breakthroughs in lightweight materials and cutting-edge adaptive applications from OEMs, Tier 1 suppliers, universities, and research institutions. Special focus will be on tangible, cost-effective strategies in lightweighting and energy management. With the increased demands for fuel efficiency and fuel economy, the internal combustion engine (ICE) continues to be examined for design improvements to improve these measures. It is projected that OEMs and suppliers will continue to optimize the ICE at least through 2020.
Event
2014-11-05
Recently downsizing turbocharged gasoline engines are dominated into market significantly. A low-pressure cooled EGR system has been studied in Nissan to improve fuel econmy for tourbocharged gasoline engine especially in high load condition. This presentation shows the system architecture, fuel economy benefit and control strategies of LP-EGR system.
Training / Education
2014-11-03
Improving vehicular fuel efficiency is of paramount importance to the global economy. Governmental regulations, climate change and associated health concerns, as well as the drive towards energy independence, have created a technical need to achieve greater fuel efficiency. While vehicle manufacturers are focusing efforts on improved combustion strategies, smaller displacement engines, weight reduction, low friction surfaces, etc., the research involved in developing fuel efficient engine oils has been less publicized. This seminar will highlight the role of lubricants in improving fuel efficiency and provide strategies for selecting the best oil for a given application.
Event
2014-10-21
This session focuses on technologies such as advanced and partially mixed combustion, cooled EGR boosting, ignition and direct injection technologies, pressure boosting, intelligent combustion, thermal efficiency, fully variable valvetrains, and other new and developing technologies.
Event
2014-10-21
This session focuses on technologies such as advanced and partially mixed combustion, cooled EGR boosting, ignition and direct injection technologies, pressure boosting, intelligent combustion, thermal efficiency, fully variable valvetrains, and other new and developing technologies.
Training / Education
2014-10-16
Developing vehicles that achieve optimum fuel economy and acceleration performance is critical to the success of any automotive company, yet many practicing engineers have not received formal training on the broad range of factors which influence vehicle performance. This seminar provides this fundamental understanding through the development of mathematical models that describe the relevant physics and through the hands-on application of automotive test equipment. Attendees will also be introduced to software used to predict vehicle performance. The course begins with a discussion of the road load forces that act on the automobile (aerodynamic, rolling resistance, and gravitational) followed by a review of pertinent engine characteristics.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Balaji Bandaru, L. Navaneetha Rao, P. S. S. Babu, Krishna Kumar Varathan, J. Balaji
Abstract The present work describes an approach to predict the vehicle fuel economy by simulating its engine drive cycle on a transient engine dynamometer in an engine testbed. The driving cycles investigated in the current study were generated from the typical experimental data measured on different vehicles ranging from Intermediate Commercial Vehicle (ICV) to Heavy-duty Commercial Vehicle (HCV) in real-world traffic conditions include various cities, highways and village roads in India. Reliability and robustness of the method was studied on various engines with cubic capacity from 3.8 liters to 8 liters using different drive cycles, and the results were discussed. Later, using same measured drive cycles, vehicle fuel economy was predicted by a vehicle simulation tool (AVL CRUISE) and results were compared with experimental data. In addition, engine coolant temperature effect on fuel economy was investigated.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Patrick Smith, John Heywood, Wai Cheng
With ever tightening CO2 emissions standards, engine efficiency has jumped to the forefront of automotive engine focus. A proven way to realize efficiency gains is through the increase of engine compression ratio. Various experimental and simulation studies are compiled to quantify the effect of compression ratio on modern spark ignited engine efficiency. Four studies are taken from research conducted at the Sloan Automotive Laboratory at MIT and three are from the literature. Compression ratios range between 8 and 13.4 looking at gross indicated efficiency, net indicated efficiency, and brake efficiency. Curves of efficiency versus compression ratio are fit to the data points for each of the studies and normalized about a compression ratio of 10. Average curves for each of the three efficiency types across all data available show that increasing from a compression ratio of 10 to 13 results in relative increases of 5.1% for brake efficiency, 4.6% for gross indicated efficiency, and 4.5% for net indicated efficiency.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2404

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