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2017-06-26 ...
  • June 26-28, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Fuel composition has had to change with the advent of more stringent emission regulations. Reformulated gasoline (RFG), for example, is vastly different from gasoline of even ten years ago. Tightening regulations on diesel emissions will dramatically change both diesel fuel and engine design. This three-day seminar will review the fundamentals of motor fuels, combustion and motor power generation. The primary content of the course provides a basic introduction to the technology, performance, evaluation, and specifications of current gasoline, diesel, and turbine fuels.
2017-04-04
Event
Mixed modes with both flame propagation and slow auto ignition. Distinct from SI knock: autoignition is desired and will not ruin the engine. Papers describing experiments and test data, simulation results focused on applications, fuel/additive effects, and SACI mode change are invited and will be placed in appropriate sub-sessions. Papers with an emphasis on the modeling aspects of combustion are encouraged to be submitted into PFL 110 or PFL120 modeling sessions.
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0072
Moqtik Bawase, M R Saraf
ABSTRACT
2017-01-10
Technical Paper
2017-26-0063
Parashuram R Chitragar, K V Shivaprasad, G N Kumar
Hydrogen’s combustion properties made it as a gifted fuel and energy carrier to combat the current scenario of depletion of the fossil fuels and crisis of environmental pollution problems. Its superior thermo physical properties and least toxic emissions are favorable to use it in an internal combustion (IC) engine as an alternative fuel. This paper describes an experimental analysis of performance and emission parameters for a four cylinder, four stroke SI engine by supplementing hydrogen fraction with gasoline. Tests were carried out by using hydrogen fraction from 0-10% in step of 2%. Study revealed an improvement in brake power, efficiency and brake specific energy consumption up to 8% hydrogen fractions in comparison with gasoline while volumetric efficiency decreased for all hydrogen fractions. Carbon monoxide (CO), Hydrocarbons (HC) emissions were reduced and Nitrogen oxides (NOx) was slightly increased for all hydrogen fractions than gasoline.
2016-11-16
Magazine
Focus on advanced safety systems and human-factor interventions The impact of REACH on the aviation sector Considered the most comprehensive chemical-regulation legislation to date, REACH presents serious ramifications for the aircraft industry. Lightweighting: What's Next? Experts weigh in on the challenges and future enablers in the battle to reduce vehicle mass. The best of COMVEC 2016 Autonomous vehicles and improved fuel efficiency via advanced powertrain solutions are pressing topics detailed in this select group of technical papers from the SAE Commercial Vehicle Engineering Congress. Optimizing waste heat recovery for long-haul trucks Autonomous solutions in agriculture Downsizing a HD diesel engine for off-highway applications Zero-emissions electric aircraft: Theory vs. reality
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0012
Zhimin Lin, Kotaro Takeda, Yuki Yoshida, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
Abstract This study was conducted to investigate the influence of cooled recirculated exhaust gas (EGR) on abnormal combustion in a Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. The condition of abnormal HCCI combustion accompanied by cylinder pressure oscillations was photographed with a high-speed camera using a 2-stroke optically accessible engine that enabled visualization of the entire bore area. Exhaust gas was cooled with a water-cooled intercooler for introducing cooled EGR. Experiments were conducted in which the quantity of cooled EGR introduced was varied and a comparison was made of the autoignition behavior obtained under each condition in order to investigate the influence of cooled EGR on abnormal HCCI combustion. The results revealed that cylinder pressure oscillations were reduced when cooled EGR was introduced. That reduction was found to be mainly ascribable to the effect of cooled EGR on changing the ignition timing.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0002
Yuki Yoshida, Kotaro Takeda, Zhimin Lin, Masanori Yamada, Akira Iijima, Mitsuaki Tanabe, Hideo Shoji
Abstract Improving the thermal efficiency of internal combustion engines requires operation under a lean combustion regime and a higher compression ratio, which means that the causes of autoignition and pressure oscillations in this operating region must be made clear. However, there is limited knowledge of autoignition behavior under lean combustion conditions. Therefore, in this study, experiments were conducted in which the ignition timing and intake air temperature (scavenging temperature) of a 2-stroke optically accessible test engine were varied to induce autoignition under a variety of conditions. The test fuel used was a primary reference fuel with an octane rating of 90. The results revealed that advancing the ignition timing under lean combustion conditions also advanced the autoignition timing, though strong pressure oscillations on the other hand tended not to occur.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0006
Ran Amiel, Leonid Tartakovsky
Abstract This paper provides an analysis of the effect of a flight altitude on knock occurrence in reciprocating SI turbocharged engines. It presents results of the computational study aimed at investigating reasons leading to knock occurrence and methods of alleviating the knock tendency of small aircraft engines. Turbochargers are frequently used to improve the performance of aviation platforms at high altitudes. Although a turbocharger provides the benefits of increased power, improved BSFC and a downsized engine, it can result in engine knock because of increasing the intake air temperature, due to a rise in the compression ratios as the air density drops. Aerial platforms experience environmental conditions that can change drastically in a matter of a few minutes. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the combined effects of altitude, initial ground temperature, humidity, flight velocity and fuel octane numbers on the emergence of knock following takeoff.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0005
Kotaro Takeda, Shimada Takashi, Yuki Yoshida, ZhiMin Lin, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
Abstract In-cylinder visualization of the entire bore area at an identical frame rate was used to investigate knocking conditions under spark ignition (SI) combustion and under Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion in the same test engine. A frequency analysis was also conducted on the measured pressure signals. The results revealed that a combustion regime accompanied by strong pressure oscillations occurred in both the SI and HCCI modes, which was presumably caused by rapid autoignition with attendant brilliant light emission that took place near the cylinder wall. It was found that the knocking timing was the dominant factor of this combustion regime accompanied by cylinder pressure oscillations in both the SI and HCCI combustion modes.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0007
Kento Shimizu, Shuhei Takahata, Kenta Miura, Hideo Shoji, Akira Iijima, Toshimasa Utaka, Kazushi Tamura
Technologies for further improving vehicle fuel economy have attracted widespread attention in recent years. However, one problem with some approaches is the occurrence of abnormal combustion such as low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) that occurs under low-speed, high-load operating conditions. One proposed cause of LSPI is that oil droplets diluted by the fuel enter the combustion chamber and become a source of ignition. Another proposed cause is that deposits peel off and become a source of ignition. A four-stroke air-cooled single-cylinder engine was used in this study to investigate the influence of Ca-based additives having different properties on abnormal combustion by means of in-cylinder visualization and absorption spectroscopic measurements. The results obtained for neutral and basic Ca-based additives revealed that the former had an effect on advancing the time of autoignition.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0045
Joseph K. Ausserer, Marc D. Polanka, Jacob Baranski, Paul Litke
Abstract Small remotely piloted aircraft (10-25 kg) powered by internal combustion engines typically operate on motor gasoline, which has an anti-knock index (AKI) of >80. To comply with the single-battlefield-fuel initiative in DoD Directive 4140.25, interest has been increasing in converting the 1-10 kW power plants in the aforementioned size class to run on lower AKI fuels such as diesel and JP-8, which have AKIs of ∼20. It has been speculated that the higher losses (short circuiting, incomplete combustion, heat transfer) that cause these engines to have lower efficiencies than their conventional-scale counterparts may also relax the fuel-AKI requirements of the engines. To investigate that idea, the fuel-AKI requirement of a 3W-55i engine was mapped and compared to that of the engine on the manufacturer-recommended 98 (octane number) ON fuel.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0011
Keito Agui, Hirotaka Suzuki, Yuki Takamura, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
Issues that must be addressed to make Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines a practical reality include the difficulty of controlling the ignition timing and suppression of rapid combustion under high load conditions. Overcoming these issues to make HCCI engines viable for practical application is indispensable to the further advancement of internal combustion engines. Previous studies have reported that the operating region of HCCI combustion can be expanded by using DME and Methane blended fuels.(1), (2), (3), (4), (5) The reason is that the reaction characteristics of these two low-carbon fuels, which have different ignition properties, have the effect of inducing heat release in two stages during main combustion, thus avoiding excessively rapid combustion. However, further moderation of rapid combustion in high-load region is needed to expand the operation region. This study focused on supercharging and use of blended fuels.
2016-10-24
Journal Article
2016-01-9075
Martijn van Essen, Sander Gersen, Gerco van Dijk, Torsten Mundt, Howard Levinsky
Abstract The effects of air humidity on the knock characteristics of fuels are investigated in a lean-burn, high-speed medium BMEP engine fueled with a CH4 + 4.7 mole% C3H8 gas mixture. Experiments are carried out with humidity ratios ranging from 4.3 to 11 g H2O/kg dry air. The measured pressure profiles at non-knocking conditions are compared with calculated pressure profiles using a model that predicts the time-dependent in-cylinder conditions (P, T) in the test engine (“combustion phasing”). This model was extended to include the effects of humidity. The results show that the extended model accurately computes the in-cylinder pressure history when varying the water fraction in air. Increasing the water vapor content in air decreases the peak pressure and temperature significantly, which increases the measured Knock Limited Spark Timing (KLST); at 4.3 g H2O/kg dry air the KLST is 19 °CA BTDC while at 11 g H2O/kg dry air the KLST is 21 °CA BTDC for the same fuel.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2259
George S. Dodos, Chrysovalanti E. Tsesmeli, Fanourios Zannikos
Abstract The fuel supply chain faces challenges associated with microbial contamination symptoms. Microbial growth is an issue usually known to be associated with middle distillate fuels and biodiesel, however, incidents where microbial populations have been isolated from unleaded gasoline storage tanks have also been recently reported. Alcohols are employed as gasoline components and the use of these oxygenates is rising, especially ethanol, which can be a renewable alternative to gasoline, as well. Despite their alleged disinfectant properties, a number of field observations suggests that biodeterioration could be a potential issue in fuel systems handling ethanol-blended gasoline. For this reason, in this study, the effect of alcohols on microbial proliferation in unleaded gasoline fuel was assessed. Ethanol (EtOH), iso-propyl alcohol (IPA) and tert-butyl-alcohol (TBA) were evaluated as examples of alcohols utilized in gasoline as oxygenates.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2307
Guillaume Bourhis, Jean-Pascal Solari, Roland DAUPHIN, Loic De Francqueville
Abstract Efficiency of spark ignition (SI) engines is limited towards high loads by the occurrence of knock, which is linked to the octane number of the fuel. Running the engine at its optimal efficiency requires a high octane number at high load whereas a low octane number can be used at low load. Current project aims at developing an “Octane on Demand” (OOD) concept: the fuel octane number is adjusted “on demand” to prevent knock occurrence by adapting the fuel RON injected in the combustion chamber. Thus, the engine cycle efficiency is increased by always keeping combustion phasing at optimum. This is achieved by a dual fuel injection strategy, involving a low-RON base-fuel and a high-RON octane booster. The ratio of fuel quantity on each injector is adapted to fit the RON requirement function of engine operating conditions. This OOD concept requires a good characterization of the octane requirement needed to run the engine at its optimal efficiency over the entire map.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2167
Kohtaro Hashimoto, Tomohide Kudo, Takuya Sato, Ichiro Takase, Takamasa Suzuki, Tatsuya Nakano
Abstract For the purpose of developing onboard gasoline reforming technology for higher octane number fuel on demand, octane number enhancement of gasoline surrogate by aerobic oxidation using N-hydroxyphthalimide catalyst was investigated. At first, octane numbers of the oxygen-containing products from alkane and aromatic compound were estimated using a fuel ignition analyzer. As a result, not only alcohol but also ketones and aldehydes have higher octane numbers than the original alkanes and aromatic compound. Next, gasoline surrogate was oxidized aerobically with N-hydroxyphthalimide derivative catalyst and cobalt catalyst at conditions below 100 °C. As a result, fuel molecules were oxidized to produce alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, and carboxylic acids. N-hydroxyphthalimide derivative catalyst with higher solubility in gasoline surrogate has higher oxidation ability. Furthermore, the estimated octane number of the oxidized gasoline surrogate improves 17 RON.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2291
Yongsheng He, Zhimin Liu, Ian Stahl, Guiqiang Zhang, Youneng Zheng
Abstract Stochastic pre-ignition (SPI) has been commonly observed in turbocharged spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engines at low-speed and high-load conditions, which causes extremely high cylinder pressures that can damage an engine immediately or degrade the engine life. The compositions and properties of fuels and lubricants have shown a strong impact on SPI frequency. This study experimentally evaluated SPI behaviors on a 2.0-liter 4-cylinder turbocharged SIDI engine with China V market fuel and China fuel blended to US Tier II fuel specifications. China V market fuel showed significantly higher SPI frequency and severity than China blended US Tier II fuel, which was attributed to its lower volatility between 100 °C to 150 °C (or lower T60 to T90 in the distillation curve). Two different formulations of lubricant oils were also tested and their impact on SPI were compared.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2294
Hwasup Song, Han Ho Song
Abstract Livengood-Wu integration model is acknowledged as a relatively simple but fairly accurate autoignition prediction method which has been widely recognized as a methodology predicting knock occurrence of a spark-ignition (SI) engine over years. Fundamental idea of the model is that the chemical reactivity of fuel under a certain thermodynamic test condition can be represented by inverse of the acquired ignition delay. However, recent studies show that the predictability of the model seems to deteriorate if the tested fuel exhibits negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior which is primarily caused by two-stage ignition characteristics. It is convincing that the cool flame exothermicity during the first ignition stage is a major cause that limits the prediction capability of the integration model, therefore a new ignition delay concept based on cool flame elimination is introduced in order to minimize the thermal effect of the cool flame.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2292
Masaharu Kassai, Ken Torii, Taisuke Shiraishi, Toru Noda, Tor Kit Goh, Karsten Wilbrand, Shaun Wakefield, Adam Healy, David Doyle, Roger Cracknell, Masahiko Shibuya
Abstract The effects of lubricant oil and fuel properties on low speed pre-ignition (LSPI) occurrence in boosted S.I. engines were experimentally evaluated with multi-cylinder engine and de-correlated oil and fuel matrices. Further, the auto-ignitability of fuel spray droplets and evaporated homogeneous fuel/oil mixtures were evaluated in a combustion bomb and pressure differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) tests to analyze the fundamental ignition process. The work investigated the effect of engine conditions, fuel volatility and various lubricant additives on LSPI occurrence. The results support the validity of aspects of the LSPI mechanism hypothesis based on the phenomenon of droplets of lubricant oil/fuel mixture (caused by adhesion of fuel spray on the liner wall) flying into the chamber and autoigniting before spark ignition.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2170
Raphael Gukelberger, Dennis Robertson, Terrence Alger, Steven Almaraz, Jess Gingrich, Vijayakannan Mohan
Abstract A turbocharged 2.0 L PFI engine was modified to operate in a low-pressure loop and Dedicated EGR (D-EGR®) engine configuration. Both engine architectures were operated with a low and high octane gasoline as well as three ethanol blends. The core of this study focused on examining combustion differences at part and high loads between the selected fuels and also the different engine configurations. Specifically, the impact of the fuels on combustion stability, burn rates, knock mitigation, required ignition energy, and efficiency were evaluated. The results showed that the knock resistance generally followed the octane rating of the fuel. At part loads, the burn rates, combustion stability, and EGR tolerance was marginally improved with the high ethanol blends. When combustion was not knock or stability limited, the efficiency differences between the fuels were negligible. The D-EGR engine was much less sensitive to fuel changes in terms of burn rates than the LPL EGR setup.
2016-10-17
Technical Paper
2016-01-2257
Hua LI, Liang Yu, Linqi Ouyang, Shuzhou Sun
Abstract The ignition delay time of toluene reference fuels composed of iso-Octane, n-heptane and toluene was studied in a shock tube under the conditions of medium to high temperature ranges, different pressures (10-20 bar), and various equivalence ratios (0.5,1.0,1.5 and 2) by reflected waves.Three different ternary blends, TRF2 (42.8% iso-Octane/13.7% n-heptane/43.5% toluene), TRF3 (65% iso-Octane/10% n-heptane/25% toluene) and TRF4 (87.2% iso-Octane/6.3% n-heptane/6.5% toluene), with the same Research Octane Number of 95 (RON=95) were constructed. The experimental results showed that there was an obvious negative correlation between the ignition delay time of the toluene reference fuels and the pressure, temperature and equivalence ratio; and, a minimal discrepancy of TRF2, TRF3, and TRF4 was measured at pressures of 10 and 20 bar in a stoichiometric ratio. A detailed chemical mechanism was established to research the surrogate combustion properties.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2234
Ahmed F. Khan, Alexey Burluka, Jens Neumeister, Dave OudeNijeweme, Paul Freeland, John Mitcalf
Abstract A holistic modelling approach has been employed to predict combustion, cyclic variability and knock propensity of a turbocharged downsized SI engine fuelled with gasoline. A quasi-dimensional, thermodynamic combustion modelling approach has been coupled with chemical kinetics modelling of autoignition using reduced mechanisms for realistic gasoline surrogates. The quasi-dimensional approach allows a fast and appreciably accurate prediction of the effects of operating conditions on the burn-rate and makes it possible to evaluate engine performance. It has also provided an insight into the nature of the turbulent flame as the boost pressure and speed is varied. In order to assess the sensitivity of the end-gas chemical kinetics to cyclic variability, the in-cylinder turbulence and charge composition were perturbed according to a Gaussian distribution.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2244
Ulrich Spicher, Max Magar, Jens Hadler
Abstract At part load and wide open throttle operation with stratified charge and lean mixture conditions the Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engine offers similar efficiency levels compared to compression ignition engines The present paper reports on results of recent studies on the impact of the in-cylinder processes in DISI engines e. g. the injection, the in-cylinder flow, the mixture preparation and the ignition on the combustion, the energy conversion and the exhaust emission behavior. The analyses of the spray behavior, of the in-cylinder flow during compression as well as of the flame propagation have been carried out applying advanced optical measurement techniques. The results enable a targeted optimization of the combustion process with respect to engine efficiency and exhaust emissions. The benefits of an increase in fuel injection pressures up to 100 MPa are discussed.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2295
Chunsheng Ji, John Dec, Jeremie Dernotte, William Cannella
Abstract Previous work has shown that conventional diesel ignition improvers, 2-ethylhexyl nitrate (EHN) and di-tert-butyl peroxide (DTBP), can be used to enhance the autoignition of a regular-grade E10 gasoline in a well premixed low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engine, hereafter termed an HCCI engine, at naturally aspirated and moderately boosted conditions (up to 180 kPa absolute) with a constant engine speed of 1200 rpm and a 14:1 compression ratio. In the current work the effect of EHN on boosted HCCI combustion is further investigated with a higher compression ratio (16:1) piston and over a range of engine speeds (up to 2400 rpm). The results show that the higher compression ratio and engine speeds can make the combustion of a regular-grade E10 gasoline somewhat less stable. The addition of EHN improves the combustion stability by allowing combustion phasing to be more advanced for the same ringing intensity.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2293
Michael Pamminger, James Sevik, Riccardo Scarcelli, Thomas Wallner, Steven Wooldridge, Brad Boyer, Carrie M. Hall
Abstract The compression ratio is a strong lever to increase the efficiency of an internal combustion engine. However, among others, it is limited by the knock resistance of the fuel used. Natural gas shows a higher knock resistance compared to gasoline, which makes it very attractive for use in internal combustion engines. The current paper describes the knock behavior of two gasoline fuels, and specific incylinder blend ratios with one of the gasoline fuels and natural gas. The engine used for these investigations is a single cylinder research engine for light duty application which is equipped with two separate fuel systems. Both fuels can be used simultaneously which allows for gasoline to be injected into the intake port and natural gas to be injected directly into the cylinder to overcome the power density loss usually connected with port fuel injection of natural gas.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2168
Masaharu Kassai, Taisuke Shiraishi, Toru Noda, Mamoru Hirabe, Yoshiki Wakabayashi, Jin Kusaka, Yasuhiro Daisho
Abstract With the development of downsized spark ignition (SI) engines, low-speed pre-ignition (LSPI) has been observed more frequently as an abnormal combustion phenomenon, and there is a critical need to solve this issue. It has been acknowledged that LSPI is not directly triggered by autoignition of the fuel, but by some other material with a short ignition delay time. It was previously reported that LSPI can be caused by droplets of lubricant oil intermixed with the fuel. In this work, the ignition behavior of lubricant component containing fuel droplets was experimentally investigated by using a constant volume chamber (CVC) and a rapid compression and expansion machine (RCEM), which enable visualization of the combustion process in the cylinder. Various combinations of fuel compositions for the ambient fuel-air mixture and fractions of base oil/metallic additives/fuel for droplets were tested.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2166
Ahfaz Ahmed, Muhammad Waqas, Nimal Naser, Eshan Singh, William Roberts, Sukho Chung, Mani Sarathy
Abstract Commercial gasoline fuels are complex mixtures of numerous hydrocarbons. Their composition differs significantly owing to several factors, source of crude oil being one of them. Because of such inconsistency in composition, there are multiple gasoline fuel compositions with similar octane ratings. It is of interest to comparatively study such fuels with similar octane ratings and different composition, and thus dissimilar physical and chemical properties. Such an investigation is required to interpret differences in combustion behavior of gasoline fuels that show similar knock characteristics in a cooperative fuel research (CFR) engine, but may behave differently in direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines or any other engine combustion modes.
2016-10-17
Journal Article
2016-01-2209
Uisung Lee, Jeongwoo Han, Michael Wang, Jacob Ward, Elliot Hicks, Dan Goodwin, Rebecca Boudreaux, Per Hanarp, Henrik Salsing, Parthav Desai, Emmanuel Varenne, Patrik Klintbom, Werner Willems, Sandra L. Winkler, Heiko Maas, Robert De Kleine, John Hansen, Tine Shim, Erik Furusjö
Abstract Dimethyl ether (DME) is an alternative to diesel fuel for use in compression-ignition engines with modified fuel systems and offers potential advantages of efficiency improvements and emission reductions. DME can be produced from natural gas (NG) or from renewable feedstocks such as landfill gas (LFG) or renewable natural gas from manure waste streams (MANR) or any other biomass. This study investigates the well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions of five DME production pathways as compared with those of petroleum gasoline and diesel using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET®) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).
CURRENT
2016-10-04
Standard
J1832_201610
This SAE Recommended Practice Document promotes uniformity in the evaluation tests and performance measurements that are conducted on fuel injectors that are used in low-pressure gasoline engine applications. The scope of this document is limited to electronically-actuated fuel injection devices that are utilized in automotive gasoline port fuel injection systems where the fuel supply pressure is usually below 1000 kPa (low-pressure). Detailed test procedures are provided for determining numerous PFI injector parameters, including, but not limited to, flow curves, leakage, electromechanical performance, fluid compatibility and corrosion susceptibility, durability, the effects of vibration and torsional deflection, thermal cycling effects and noise. The standardized measurement procedures in this document are all bench tests.
2016-09-01
Magazine
Solving the Greenhouse Gas puzzle While automakers and policymakers debate the TAR, engineers and product planners prepare for the steep climb to meet GHG and CAFE rules beyond 2022. Revving up thermal characterization in the component lab The latest generation of high-speed infrared cameras can capture airbag deployments and other fast-moving actions quickly and accurately. C3 consortium aims for soot solution A newly formed group of companies led by CFD specialists Convergent Science targets exhaust particulate reduction in the combustion chamber. Inside the autonomous vehicle With less focus on driver needs, comfort, safety, and occupant productivity will become key. Editorial: Bad gas?
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