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Training / Education
2014-11-10
The automotive industry faces unprecedented growth in vehicle technologies and features that can dramatically affect the vehicle user experience. This course will provide an overview of principles and techniques for designing and developing vehicle interfaces which deliver optimal solutions while avoiding unintended consequences like driver distraction. Case studies and exercises will be used to identify best practices with key human factors design and research concepts that provide an intuitive, safe and effective user experience. Individuals interested in this topic should consider attending ID# C1341, Developing In-Vehicle Infotainment User Interfaces: Design Principles and Techniques.
Event
2014-10-21
The abundance of personal electronic devices is causing a shift in individual expectations of personal mobility. These expectations are conflicting: consumers desire personalization of their devices, but manufacturers strive for commonality; some consumers view personal mobility as a chore, others as an expression of their individuality. We will explore these dichotomies, and discuss the near and mid-term shifts in the expectation of how consumers will perceive personal mobility devices.
Event
2014-10-07
HMI and Human Factors Including Ergonomics Products are delivering ever greater functionality and automation, accomplishing actions and tasks by themselves that used to require substantial personal attention and manual involvement. However these complicated functionality and novel developments require efficient, effective, and intuitive user input and monitoring. At the same time owners and operators are demanding every more comfortable, easy and simple to operate products. This session explores how companies are balancing and working with these conflicting trends to meet customer needs and to deliver successful products and customer satisfaction.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Vignesh T. Shekar, Sreedhar Reddy
Bus and coach drivers spend considerably more time in the vehicle, compared to an average personal car user. However, when it comes to comfort levels, the personal cars, even the inexpensive hatchbacks score much higher than a standard bus. This is because the amount of ergonomic design considerations that go into designing a car’s driver’s workspace is much more than that of the buses. Even when it comes to the standards, cars and vans that fall under M1 category of vehicles have detailed recommendations and standards for individual systems and assembly layout. This is not the case for M3 category of vehicles that is buses. To understand this lacuna, the existing standards and recommendations pertaining directly or remotely to bus driver workspace were studied. It was understood, beyond certain elementary recommendations, there were very few standards available exclusively for buses. In some cases, bus manufacturers are forced to adopt standards pertaining to cars and vans for their buses.
Training / Education
2014-09-30
Although many have an idea of what the term “driver distraction” means, there is no common definition within the research community. Additionally, there are many studies that have investigated the topic, but with varying and sometimes conflicting results. What should be made of these discrepancies? This four-hour web seminar will provide an overview of driver distraction (predominantly electronic devices): the problem; how to define it; the current state of research and how to critically evaluate that research to make informed decisions; and the effectiveness of state laws and fleet policies to reduce it.
Event
2014-09-24
As sensor system proliferate across multiple platforms, particularly with the explosion of Unmanned Intelligence Systems, the desire for interoperability and interchangeability of the sensor systems across multiple platforms and multiple services has grown. This session will address SAE activities in development of standards to support interoperable/interchangeable sensors, the challenges in developing and using the standards and opportunities for future sensor interface definitions.
Event
2014-09-23
With the acquisition of ARINC by SAE, the leadership of ARINC is providing an overview of the activities of the organization, including the AEEC, AMC, and FSEMC.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Prashant Vadgaonkar, Ullas Janardhan, Adishesha Sivaramasastry
Performance of Avionics systems is dictated by the timely availability and usage of critical health parameters. Various sensors are extensively used to acquire and communicate the desired parameters. In the Present day’s scenario, sensors are configured with wired approach. Number of sensors is growing due to automation, increasing the accuracy of intended Aircraft functions. Sensors are distributed all over the Aircraft and they are connected through wired network for signal processing and communicating. LRU’s which are integrating various sensors also use wired approach for communication. The Key driver for Airline operational cost is fuel. Fuel quantity is a direct function of weight. Weight of cables contributes significantly to the overall weight of the aircraft. Use of wired network approach poses challenges in terms of cable routing, stray capacitances, noise and mechanical structure. This paper describes various merits and demerits of wired sensors and their interface techniques.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Helen Lockett, Sarah Fletcher, Nicolas Luquet
Abstract The installation of essential systems into aircraft wings involves numerous labour-intensive processes. Many human operators are required to perform complex manual tasks over long periods of time in very challenging physical positions due to the limited access and confined space. This level of human activity in poor ergonomic conditions directly impacts on speed and quality of production but also, in the longer term, can cause costly human resource problems from operators' cumulative development of musculoskeletal injuries. These problems are exacerbated in areas of the wing which house multiple systems components because the volume of manual work and number of operators is higher but the available space is reduced. To improve the efficiency of manual work processes which cannot yet be automated we therefore need to consider how we might redesign systems installations in the enclosed wing environment to better enable operator access and reduce production time. This paper describes a recent study that applied design for assembly and maintainability principles and CATIA v5 computer aided design software to identify small design changes for wing systems installation tasks.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 5878

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