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Training / Education
2014-11-10
The automotive industry faces unprecedented growth in vehicle technologies and features that can dramatically affect the vehicle user experience. This course will provide an overview of principles and techniques for designing and developing vehicle interfaces which deliver optimal solutions while avoiding unintended consequences like driver distraction. Case studies and exercises will be used to identify best practices with key human factors design and research concepts that provide an intuitive, safe and effective user experience. Individuals interested in this topic should consider attending ID# C1341, Developing In-Vehicle Infotainment User Interfaces: Design Principles and Techniques.
Event
2014-10-21
The abundance of personal electronic devices is causing a shift in individual expectations of personal mobility. These expectations are conflicting: consumers desire personalization of their devices, but manufacturers strive for commonality; some consumers view personal mobility as a chore, others as an expression of their individuality. We will explore these dichotomies, and discuss the near and mid-term shifts in the expectation of how consumers will perceive personal mobility devices.
Event
2014-10-21
Dr. Steve Underwood, University of Michigan - Dearborn, will present findings from an ongoing expert forecast on connected, automated, and electric vehicles and their potential for contributing to sustainable mobility in the United States, sponsored by the Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan. He will also present the results of the survey of conference attendees. The findings suggest that vehicle solutions like first-and-last mile electric vehicles, self-driving commuter vehicles, and V2I demand management should augment and motivate creative use of the legacy infrastructure in ways that strengthen communities as well as increase worker productivity while improving safety and ultimately ensuring sustainable mobility in United States. The purpose of Dr. Underwood's integrative assessment is to investigate these alternative modalities more completely and to forecast what features of the design will most likely become part of the mobility solution. The expert survey was designed to forecast the future of automated and connected vehicles addressing three levels of automation over a period of years.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Harald Stoffels, Kay Hohenboeken
Abstract The impact of the number of cylinders on two downsized gasoline engines on driving habits in the same passenger-vehicle type was investigated. This was carried out with two similar vehicles, equipped with an in-line three cylinder (i3) and an in-line four cylinder (i4) engine, both having same power, torque and transient-response behaviour. Both engine types were mated to six-speed manual transmissions with same gear-ratios and dual-mass flywheel characteristics. The study was performed by letting a statistically significant number of subjects driving the same route and both vehicles consecutively. The relevant data during driving were recorded simultaneously from either vehicle integrated sensors (CAN), and secondary transducers. We found that the in-line three cylinder was operated at higher engine speeds even though it was operated at similar acceleration- and load levels like the in-line four cylinder power-train, whereat the off-set of the engine speed shows no correlation with the difference in firing frequency between both engine types.
Event
2014-10-09
Training / Education
2014-09-30
Although many have an idea of what the term “driver distraction” means, there is no common definition within the research community. Additionally, there are many studies that have investigated the topic, but with varying and sometimes conflicting results. What should be made of these discrepancies? This four-hour web seminar will provide an overview of driver distraction (predominantly electronic devices): the problem; how to define it; the current state of research and how to critically evaluate that research to make informed decisions; and the effectiveness of state laws and fleet policies to reduce it.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Joshua L. Every, M. Kamel Salaani, Frank S. Barickman, Devin H. Elsasser, Dennis A. Guenther, Gary J. Heydinger, Sughosh J. Rao
Dynamic Brake Support (DBS) is a safety system that has been applied to various passenger cars and has been shown to be effective at assisting drivers in avoiding or mitigating rear-end collisions. The objective of a DBS system is to ensure that the brake system is applied quickly and at sufficient pressure when a driver responds to a collision imminent situation. DBS is capable of improving braking response due to a passenger car driver's tendency to utilize multi-stage braking. Interest is developing in using DBS on commercial vehicles. In order to evaluate the possible improvement in safety that could be realized through the use of DBS, driver braking behavior must first be analyzed to confirm that improvement is possible and necessary. To determine if this is the case, a study of the response of truck drivers' braking behavior in collision imminent situations is conducted. This paper presents the method of evaluation and results. Data was drawn from a prior NHTSA simulator study and showed that many drivers exhibited multi-stage braking during four different imminent crash scenarios.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Takahiko Yoshino, Hiromichi Nozaki
Abstract In recent years, the conversion of vehicles to electric power has been accelerating, and if a full conversion to electric power is achieved, further advancements in vehicle kinematic control technology are expected. Therefore, it is thought that kinematic performance in the critical cornering range could be further improved by significantly controlling not only the steering angle but also the camber angle of the tires through the use of electromagnetic actuators. This research focused on a method of ground negative camber angle control that is proportional to the steering angle as a technique to improve maneuverability and stability to support the new era of electric vehicles, and the effectiveness thereof was clarified. As a result, it was found that in the critical cornering range as well, camber angle control can control both the yaw moment and lateral acceleration at the turning limit. It was also confirmed that both stability and the steering effect in the critical cornering range are improved by implementing ground negative camber angle control that is proportional to the steering angle using actuators.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Sanket Pawar
Abstract Off-road commercial vehicles many times have to work at remote areas in poor working conditions like reduced visibility due to fog, snow, inadequate ambient lighting, dust etc. They may not have any access to emergency facilities in such places. Challenging geographical terrains and adverse weather conditions makes the situation worse. The combination of both can further degrade working conditions. The operator may need to either work or guide his vehicle through tight places or in hilly areas having such conditions. That imposes many challenges to operator in terms of efficiency & safety of both operator & vehicle. In an effort to increase productivity and efficiency operator may miss to look at safety aspects consequently, leading to accidents that can incur heavy losses due to damages to vehicle further delaying the work. It can even lead to a life threatening emergency in some cases. On the other hand, decrease in efficiency results in increased cost of operation due to unnecessary wastage of fuel & delays in getting the work done.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Quon Kwan, Leverson Boodlal
In this particular field study, the authors have demonstrated that telematics can be used to monitor and improve safe and fuel-efficient driving behavior. Telematics was used to monitor various driver performance parameters: unsafe events (sudden accelerations and hard braking expressed as Yellow and Red events, depending on severity), speeding, engine revolutions per minute (RPM), and fuel economy (miles per gallon). The drivers consisted of two groups: drivers of day cabs and drivers of sleeper cabs. The drivers of both groups were monitored during a baseline period during which no feedback, coaching, or rewards were provided. Then, the drivers of both groups were monitored during an intervention period, during which drivers were provided with feedback, coaching, and rewards. As the result of monitoring unsafe events and of driver intervention, drivers of sleeper cabs showed a 55 percent reduction from the baseline in less severe (Yellow) unsafe events and a 60 percent reduction from the baseline in more severe (Red) unsafe events.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Jiaqi Xu, Bradley Thompson, Hwan-Sik Yoon
Abstract Hydraulic excavators perform numerous tasks in the construction and mining industry. Although ground grading is a common task, proper grading cannot easily be achieved. Grading requires an experienced operator to control the boom, arm, and bucket cylinders in a rapid and coordinated manner. Due to this reason, automated grade control is being considered as an effective alternative to conventional human-operated ground grading. In this paper, a path-planning method based on a 2D kinematic model and inverse kinematics is used to determine the desired trajectory of an excavator's boom, arm, and bucket cylinders. Then, the developed path planning method and PI control algorithms for the three cylinders are verified by a simple excavator model developed in Simulink®. The simulation results show that the automated grade control algorithm can grade level or with reduced operation time and error.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Vignesh T. Shekar, Sreedhar Reddy
Abstract Bus and coach drivers spend considerably more time in the vehicle, compared to an average personal car user. However, when it comes to comfort levels, the personal cars, even the inexpensive hatchbacks score much higher than a standard bus. This is because the amount of ergonomic design considerations that go into designing a car's DWS (driver workspace) is much more than that of buses. To understand this lacuna, the existing standards and recommendations pertaining directly or remotely to bus driver workspace were studied. It was understood, beyond certain elementary recommendations, there were very few standards available exclusively for buses. This paper ventures to establish a set of guidelines, exclusively for designing bus and coach driver workspace. The various systems in the driver's work space and their relevance to driver's ergonomics are discussed. References are drawn from different case studies and standards to come up with recommendations and guidelines. For those aspects that were not covered in existing literature, physical evaluations were done on select Ashok Leyland buses.
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