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Viewing 1 to 30 of 4499
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1782
Kyoung-Jin Chang, Dong Chul Park
Abstract This paper discusses approaches to emotionally improve the driving sound based on Active Sound Design (ASD). In the first step, target sound design methods are suggested in order to represent the vehicle’s concept and brand image via a driving sound. In this method, formant filter and musical chords are applied to the target sound synthesis. In the second step, a technique to make a target sound realistic in ASD system is discussed, which enables to stimulate the customers' emotion. In this technique, the process to simulate a musical instrument sound for a vivid driving sound and synthesize the sound with FIR filter is studied. Finally, the improved driving sound is demonstrated in ASD system.
2016-04-14
Event
Aging mobility is important to the automotive industry for the following reasons: • 37% of the population is over age 50 • 52% of vehicles sold in 2012 were to > 55 years of age consumers. • A 65 year old is 4x more likely to buy a new car than a 25 year old. Presentations will cover how this group will have unique issues associated with it that will need to be addressed by the automotive industry as they design vehicles for this ever growing population.
2016-04-13
Event
Visual perception continues to be a critical aspect of overall driver performance. This session offers presentations highlighting new developments designed to provide better support for driver rearward vision, better understanding of how to measure light and its effects on drivers’ eyes, and better understanding of how drivers accomplish the visually difficult task of negotiating intersections.
2016-04-13
Event
Designing vehicles with good ergonomics is one of the many factors needed to achieve high customer satisfaction. A basic source for comfort (or discomfort) lies in the vehicle’s seats. To design for seat comfort requires knowledge of the size of the driver, the structure of the seat, the position of the seat in the vehicle and the trip duration. Papers offers in this session could include topics such as seat back angle, vehicle packaging and trip duration.
2016-04-13
Event
Designing vehicles with good ergonomics is one of the many factors needed to achieve high customer satisfaction. A basic source for comfort (or discomfort) lies in the vehicle’s seats. To design for seat comfort requires knowledge of the size of the driver, the structure of the seat, the position of the seat in the vehicle and the trip duration. Papers offers in this session could include topics such as seat back angle, vehicle packaging and trip duration.
2016-04-12
Event
As information and entertainment to and from the vehicle (Telematics) become more prolific it is critical to increase our understanding of how the driver understands and uses Telematics functions. Equally critical is how those functions impact the driver. This session will address those issues.
2016-04-12
Event
As information and entertainment to and from the vehicle (Telematics) become more prolific it is critical to increase our understanding of how the driver understands and uses Telematics functions. Equally critical is how those functions impact the driver. This session will address those issues.
2016-04-06
WIP Standard
J1163
This SAE standard specifies a method and the device for use in determining the position of the Seat Index Point (SIP) for any kind of seat. This SAE document provides a uniform method for defining the location of the SIP in relation to some fixing point on the seat.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2015-01-9152
André Lundkvist, Arne Nykänen, Roger Johnsson
Abstract Many of the information systems in cars require visual attention, and a way to reduce both visual and cognitive workload could be to use sound. An experiment was designed in order to determine how driving and secondary task performance is affected by the use of information sound signals and their spatial positions. The experiment was performed in a driving simulator utilizing Lane Change Task as a driving scenario in combination with the Surrogate Reference Task as a secondary task. Two different signal sounds with different spatial positions informed the driver when a lane change should be made and when a new secondary task was presented. Driving performance was significantly improved when both signal sounds were presented in front of the driver. No significant effects on secondary task performance were found. It is recommended that signal sounds are placed in front of the driver, when possible, if the goal is to draw attention forward.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0164
Jamy Li, Xuan Zhao, Mu-Jung Cho, Wendy Ju, Bertram F. Malle
Abstract Autonomous vehicles represent a new class of transportation that may be qualitatively different from existing cars. Two online experiments assessed lay perceptions of moral norms and responsibility for traffic accidents involving autonomous vehicles. In Experiment 1, 120 US adults read a narrative describing a traffic incident between a pedestrian and a motorist. In different experimental conditions, the pedestrian, the motorist, or both parties were at fault. Participants assigned less responsibility to a self-driving car that was at fault than to a human driver who was at fault. Participants confronted with a self-driving car at fault allocated greater responsibility to the manufacturer and the government than participants who were confronted with a human driver at fault did.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 4499

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