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Training / Education
2015-09-24
Rapid advances have been made in the range of available designs and operational parameters as well as in the fundamental understanding of compact heat exchangers (CHEs). Since the majority of modern heat exchangers used for heating and cooling systems for vehicular applications are CHEs, keeping up to date with these advances is essential. This seminar will help you understand and be able to apply comprehensive information about the intricacies of CHE design, performance, operating problems and state-of-the-art-technology for car and truck applications.
Training / Education
2015-03-23
Heat transfer affects the performance, emissions and durability of the engine as well as the design, packaging, material choice and fatigue life of vehicle components. This course covers the broad range of heat transfer considerations that arise during the design and development of the engine and the vehicle with a primary focus on computational models and experimental validation covering the flow of heat from its origin in the engine cylinders and its transfer via multiple paths through engine components. Specifically, the course will cover heat transfer design considerations related to the following: engine cooling and lubrication systems as well as bay-to-bay breathing; exhaust system and after-treatment components; tail pipe gas temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between the engine and its exhaust system with the components in the vehicle under-hood and under-body; turbochargers; passenger cabin HVAC system, including windshield de-icing; battery cooling; heat exchangers and challenges associated with predicting thermal mechanical fatigue life of components.
Training / Education
2014-11-11
The In-Vehicle user environment is transitioning from fixed dedicated features to an extensible connected interface that can dramatically increase complexity faced by the driver. This course will provide a systematic design method to develop intuitive and safe vehicle interface solutions. Participants will learn user interaction design steps, tools, and the team synergies required to develop an interface from concept to the final product. The course will use exercises to practice interface design, with example interfaces to cover lessons learned. Participants will learn key interaction elements and principles to build a robust and flexible interface.
Event
2014-10-21
The abundance of personal electronic devices is causing a shift in individual expectations of personal mobility. These expectations are conflicting: consumers desire personalization of their devices, but manufacturers strive for commonality; some consumers view personal mobility as a chore, others as an expression of their individuality. We will explore these dichotomies, and discuss the near and mid-term shifts in the expectation of how consumers will perceive personal mobility devices.
Event
2014-10-21
Dr. Steve Underwood, University of Michigan - Dearborn, will present findings from an ongoing expert forecast on connected, automated, and electric vehicles and their potential for contributing to sustainable mobility in the United States, sponsored by the Graham Environmental Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan. He will also present the results of the survey of conference attendees. The findings suggest that vehicle solutions like first-and-last mile electric vehicles, self-driving commuter vehicles, and V2I demand management should augment and motivate creative use of the legacy infrastructure in ways that strengthen communities as well as increase worker productivity while improving safety and ultimately ensuring sustainable mobility in United States. The purpose of Dr. Underwood's integrative assessment is to investigate these alternative modalities more completely and to forecast what features of the design will most likely become part of the mobility solution. The expert survey was designed to forecast the future of automated and connected vehicles addressing three levels of automation over a period of years.
Event
2014-10-20
This session focuses on fundamental numerical (1D and 3D CFD) and experimental research in the areas of heat and mass transfer and fluid flow that impacts engine and vehicle performance and design. Subject areas include convection, conduction, radiation, porous media, phase change including boiling, condensation, melting and freezing. Application areas include, combustion, emissions, cooling, lubrication, exhaust, intake, fuel delivery, external air flow, under hood and under body. Fundamental papers describing unique thermodynamic processes or physical chemistry relevant to engine combustion and fuels are also welcome. Papers focused on waste heat recovery technologies should be submitted to HX102/103.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
N. Karthikeyan, Anish Gokhale, Narendra Bansode
In scooters, the Continuously Variable Transmission(CVT) is used to transmit the power from the engine to the wheels. The CVT transmission consists of a two pulleys connected to each other through a belt . The change in the transmission ratio is achieved due to the change in the pulley diameters. A centrifugal clutch is attached to the rear pulley to transmit the power to wheels once the engaging engine speed is reached. The heat is generated due to the belt slippage and the engagement of the centrifugal clutch. Excessive heating may damage the belt ,clutch and deteriorate its performance. The cooling of the belt , pulleys and the clutch is thus important for its safe operation. The cooling is achieved by the centrifugal cooling fan which forces the air over the belt, pulley and clutch. A clear understanding of the cooling system is important in designing the air flow path for clutch cooling of CVT housing. The efficiency of the cooling system depends on the quantity and direction of flow .
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Dhaminda Hewavitarane, Sadami Yoshiyama, Hisashi Wadahama, Xin Li
High temperature liquids held in a subcooled state are capable of storing large amounts of energy and then explosively releasing this energy when depressurized in a phase change process known as “Flashing”. The rapid volume expansion that results from this flashing has been harnessed to drive an expansion engine working on a cycle called “The Superheated Liquid Flash, Boiling” (S.L.F.B) cycle. The first stage showed that multiphase convective boiling of the unflashed water off the heated walls of the expansion unit supplemented the Flash work output. Furthermore, Flashing was seen to improve the effectiveness of convective boiling off the walls. The results were shown to be repeatable in a modified piston engine. Convective boiling was again shown to be able to supplement the power output under specific conditions. Engine power was seen to be directly related to the peak In-Cylinder pressure, which in turn was directly related to the mass and temperature of the injected subcooled water.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Michael Franke, Shirish Bhide, Jack Liang, Michael Neitz, Thomas Hamm
Abstract Exhaust emission reduction and improvements in energy consumption will continuously determine future developments of on-road and off-road engines. Fuel flexibility by substituting Diesel with Natural Gas is becoming increasingly important. To meet these future requirements engines will get more complex. Additional and more advanced accessory systems for waste heat recovery (WHR), gaseous fuel supply, exhaust after-treatment and controls will be added to the base engine. This additional complexity will increase package size, weight and cost of the complete powertrain. Another critical element in future engine development is the optimization of the base engine. Fundamental questions are how much the base engine can contribute to meet the future exhaust emission standards, including CO2 and how much of the incremental size, weight and cost of the additional accessories can be compensated by optimizing the base engine. This paper describes options and potentials to improve the base engine for future commercial and industrial engines.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Salvador Sermeno, Eric Bideaux, Tessa Morgan, Duc Nguyen
Abstract Vehicle thermal management covers the engineering field of solutions that maintain the complete vehicle in acceptable operating conditions regarding component and fluid temperatures in an engine. The maximum efficiency rating of a Diesel engine reaches up to 45%. In order to improve the fuel efficiency of the vehicle one can reduce the losses generated by the cooling system. Ideally, the full motive force of the engine should be used for propulsion and new and more efficient energy sources have to be explored to power the secondary systems (cooling, compressed air…). This paper introduces a dynamic programming algorithm which is used to determine the maximum gains during operation for a given architecture of the cooling system of a Heavy Duty Truck. The algorithm, based in Bellman principle, will determine the best control trajectory for the pump and the fan according to energetic and control goals (fuel economy, regulation of temperature…). For this purpose, a reduced model of the cooling system based on energy balance equations has been determined and validated through simulations.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 10059

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