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2015-09-24 ...
  • September 24-25, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Rapid advances have been made in the range of available designs and operational parameters as well as in the fundamental understanding of compact heat exchangers (CHEs). Since the majority of modern heat exchangers used for heating and cooling systems for vehicular applications are CHEs, keeping up to date with these advances is essential. This seminar will help you understand and be able to apply comprehensive information about the intricacies of CHE design, performance, operating problems and state-of-the-art-technology for car and truck applications.
2015-04-21
Event
Climate control is a defining vehicle attribute and is associated with brand image. Thermal performance and quality of climate control are both critical to customer satisfaction. The system has strong design interaction with other vehicle systems, while its primary objective is to deliver thermal comfort and occupant safety with low energy consumption. Localized Comfort, Secondary Fluids, Air Quality, Controls, System Sizing and HVAC consumer interface are just a few of the recent advances.
2015-04-21
Event
The Thermal Systems Modeling and Simulation session focusses on state of the art simulation technologies for modeling thermal systems and their application in the development and optimization of vehicle thermal management and fuel economy. The papers in the session will range from empirical, 1D modeling methods to three dimensional CFD models as well as coupled methods.
2015-04-21
Event
Proper thermal management can significantly contribute to overall system energy efficiency. This session highlights the latest developments in thermal management energy efficiency.
2015-04-21
Event
Thermal Management represents one of the key aspects of the vehicle development. It ensures that the temperatures in the underhood and underbody areas are in desired ranges, that thermal systems operate as designed, and that no component operation is at risk due to excessive temperatures. This session covers the design of thermal components and systems and their vehicle integration.
2015-04-21
Event
The purpose of this session is to share experiences and lessons learned to advance the technology in the field of thermal management of electric and hybrid vehicle systems. This session presents papers covering both testing and simulation of hybrid and electric vehicle thermal systems.
2015-04-21
Event
This session considers modeling (zero-D, 1D, 2D, 3D CFD) and experimental papers on: combustion chamber, systems (lubrication, cooling, fuel, EGR); components (oil pumps, coolant pump, fuel injectors, compressors, turbines, turbochargers, torque converters, gear box, fans, bearings, valves, ports, manifolds, turbine housing); heat exchangers (radiators, oil coolers); aftertreatment (SCR, DOC, DOF, exhaust gas cooling); battery cooling (HEV, EV, motor/generator) and controls (passive and active).
2015-03-23 ...
  • March 23-24, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • September 14-15, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Heat transfer affects the performance, emissions and durability of the engine as well as the design, packaging, material choice and fatigue life of vehicle components. This course covers the broad range of heat transfer considerations that arise during the design and development of the engine and the vehicle with a primary focus on computational models and experimental validation covering the flow of heat from its origin in the engine cylinders and its transfer via multiple paths through engine components.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0044
Sambhaji Keshaw Jaybhay, Prasanna Nagarhalli, Suresh Tadigadapa, Sangeet Hari Kapoor
Context- In order to enhance fuel efficiency in buses an energy efficient air conditioning system should be deployed. This will lead to reduced parasitic load on the engine and translate into direct fuel saving. Fuel prices are increasing day by day; along with rapid depletion of fuel sources. Alternate fuels like CNG need investments in infrastructure, which is not available easily everywhere. Therefore fuel saving is vital. In case of air conditioned vehicles, the parasitic load mainly consists of power consumed by air conditioning compressor to pump the refrigerant and by blower motors and condenser fans for movement of conditioned air and heat removal respectively. Furthermore roof mounted bus air conditioning systems weigh in the range of 150-220kg (approx.) adding to the payload Necessity- Now days, most mid-size air conditioned buses are equipped with aftermarket solutions.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0234
Ramesh Pathuri, Yuvraj Patil, Prasanna Vyankatesh Nagarhalli
During early phases of vehicle program, evaluation of Air Conditioning (AC) system for its performance (time to comfort) and power consumption has become vital and hence simulation tools have gained tremendous importance. A 1D simulation model can be introduced early in the design process to evaluate several AC system configurations and parametric studies at different test conditions and which results in reduced experimental work. This paper presents a method for AC cool down simulation of passenger car with multi air zone cabin model in KULI. This approach allows the prediction of zone wise (head, body and foot) temperature and humidity distribution in the cabin for parameter studies for transient analysis. The same cabin model can deal with multiple inlets into the cabin, solar radiation, and recirculation for pre-defined cabin types.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0045
Rico Baumgart, Joerg Aurich, Jan Ackermann, Christoph Danzer
The development of an energy efficient air conditioning system for electric vehicles is an ever increasing challenge, because the cooling as well as the heating of the passenger cell reduces the cruising range dramatically. Almost always the compressor of the air conditioning system in electric cars is a scroll compressor with a separate electric motor and appropriate power electronics. However, this solution is critical in terms of the installation space, the weight and also the costs. Therefore, IAV develops innovative and energy efficient drivetrain structures for electric vehicles, which integrate the motor of the air conditioning compressor directly into the drivetrain of the vehicle. Thus it is possible to switch off the compressor motor and to use the main motor for the propulsion of the air conditioning compressor at certain driving situations. As a result the operating point of the main motor can be shifted to a better efficiency.
2014-11-23
WIP Standard
AS8040C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: a. Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b. Wing and empennage anti-icing c. Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d. Aircraft de-icing
2014-11-18
Magazine
Oil debris monitoring in aero engines In a gas turbine engine, small particles or "chips" are generated at the point of wear, serving as an advanced warning that catastrophic failure will occur if the wear is not addressed. Health monitoring systems, such as oil debris monitoring, are used to find these small particles so that the wear can be resolved before it's too late. Indigenous powertrain development Customer needs and expectations on drivability, fuel economy, and safety has pushed Indian and multinational OEMs to think about the development of powertrains and gearboxes for local needs with global standards. The next wave of crash simulation As computing speed has improved and software itself has made significant speed and performance gains with each release, modeling tools are now quick enough to build high-quality, large, high-detail vehicle models in a very efficient manner.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0044
Simone Vezzù, Carlo Cavallini, Silvano Rech, Enrico Vedelago, Alessandro Giorgetti
Abstract The deposition of thick, pore-free, high-performance copper alloy matrix composite coatings is a topic of interest for several industrial applications, including friction materials, high-strength electrical contacts, and welding electrodes, among others. This study investigates the use of cold spray to deposit CuCrZr/Al2O3 cermet coatings on aluminum alloy 6060. The objective is to integrate copper-based materials with aluminum-based materials, ensuring a high degree of mechanical and thermal contact, using a low temperature process that does not adversely affect the properties of the base materials. This technique can be used to produce integral coolers and aluminum-based bearings for automotive and motorcycle applications. Fused and crushed alumina and gas-atomized CuCrZr powder blends have been used as initial feedstocks, with compositional weight ratios of 65/35 and 80/20 (ceramic/metal).
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0050
Tomokazu Nomura, Koichiro Matsushita, Yoshihiko Fujii, Hirofumi Fujiwara
Abstract For detailed temperature estimates in the engine of a running motorcycle, newly researches were conducted on the method for calculation of temperature distribution using a three-dimensional (3D) thermal conductivity simulation after calculating the total balance of heat generation and heat dissipation of the engine using a one-dimensional (1D) thermal simulation. This project is targeted at air-cooled engines in which the cooling conditions vary significantly depending on the external shapes of the engines and the airflow around them. The heat balance is calculated using the 1D thermal simulation taking into account all the routes and processes for dissipation to the atmosphere of the heat that is generated by the combustion in the engine. The 1D engine cycle simulation is applied to calculate the heat transmission to the engine from the combustion. For the calculation of heat transfer within the engine, the engine components are converted to a one-dimensional model.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0080
Jens Steinmill, Ralf Struzyna
Abstract At a micro-CHP unit the target size of the engine controller is not mechanical torque but thermal and mechanical power. Accordingly, these demands must be implemented by the engine controller. This means that on the one hand a mechanical demand is answered under the boundary condition of the highest actual efficiency and that on the other hand thermal demands have to be processed. Since the thermal- and mechanical power output is coupled with the actual efficiency, exceeding the nominal load of the thermal power, the actual efficiency can be regulated in order to answer the demand. This can be done in consideration of the maximum achievable actual efficiency. Limits are set by the combustion stability and thermal protection functions. The functions are modelled with Matlab/Simulink and the ECU code for a rapid control prototyping system is generated. A dynamic engine test bed for internal combustion engines up to 12 kW was built to verify the motor control functions.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0108
Sejun Lee, Kyohei Ozaki, Norimasa Iida, Takahiro Sako
Abstract Recently, a potentiality of Dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept SI engine has been studied. This concept engine had four cylinders and operated with exhaust gas supplied from the single cylinder to the intake manifold. Compared with conventional SI engines, it was able to increase thermal efficiency and decrease CO, HC, and NOx emission by the high D-EGR ratio 0.25. In this study, numerical analysis of a SI engine with D-EGR system with various D-EGR ratios was conducted for detailed understanding the potentiality of this concept in terms of thermal efficiency and NOx emission. #1 cylinder of assumed engine was used as D-EGR cylinder that equivalence ratio varied from 0.6 to 3.4. Entire exhaust gas from #1 cylinder was recirculated to the other cylinders. The other cylinders run with this exhaust gas and new premixed air and fuel with various equivalence ratios from 0.6-1.0.
2014-11-01
Journal Article
2014-01-9129
Filip Nielsen, Åsa Uddheim, Jan-Olof Dalenbäck
Abstract Fuel consumption of vehicles has received increased attention in recent years; however one neglected area that can have a large effect on this is the energy usage for the interior climate. This study aims to investigate the energy usage for the interior climate for different conditions by measurements on a complete vehicle. Twelve different NEDC tests in different temperatures and thermal states of the vehicle were completed in a climatic wind tunnel. Furthermore one temperature sweep from 43° to −18°C was also performed. The measurements focused on the heat flow of the air, from its sources, to its sink, i.e. compartment. In addition the electrical and mechanical loads of the climate system were included. The different sources of heating and cooling were, for the tested powertrain, waste heat from the engine, a fuel operated heater, heat pickup of the air, evaporator cooling and cooling from recirculation.
2014-10-24
Standard
J1535_201410
This SAE Standard establishes uniform test procedures for the defrosting systems of off-road, self-propelled work machines used in construction, general purpose industrial, agricultural, and forestry machinery as referenced in table one of this document. It includes tests that can be conducted with uniform test equipment in commercially available laboratory facilities, as well as in an appropriate outdoor environment.
2014-10-20
Event
This session focuses on fundamental numerical (1D and 3D CFD) and experimental research in the areas of heat and mass transfer and fluid flow that impacts engine and vehicle performance and design. Subject areas include convection, conduction, radiation, porous media, phase change including boiling, condensation, melting and freezing. Application areas include, combustion, emissions, cooling, lubrication, exhaust, intake, fuel delivery, external air flow, under hood and under body. Fundamental papers describing unique thermodynamic processes or physical chemistry relevant to engine combustion and fuels are also welcome. Papers focused on waste heat recovery technologies should be submitted to HX102/103.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2596
Bo Hu, Colin Copeland, Chris Brace, Sam Akehurst, Alessandro Romagnoli, Ricardo Martinez-Botas, J.W.G Turner
Abstract Engines equipped with pressure charging systems are more prone to knock partly due the increased intake temperature. Meanwhile, turbocharged engines when operating at high engine speeds and loads cannot fully utilize the exhaust energy as the wastegate is opened to prevent overboost. The turboexpansion concept thus is conceived to reduce the intake temperature by utilizing some otherwise unexploited exhaust energy. This concept can be applied to any turbocharged engines equipped with both a compressor and a turbine-like expander on the intake loop. The turbocharging system is designed to achieve maximum utilization of the exhaust energy, from which the intake charge is over-boosted. After the intercooler, the turbine-like expander expands the over-compressed intake charge to the required plenum pressure and reduces its temperature whilst recovering some energy through the connection to the crankshaft.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2594
Xinyu Wang, Yadong Deng
Abstract Automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), which effectively converts exhaust thermal energy into electrical energy, can gradually improve the utilization efficiency of energy. The heat exchanger of TEG is one of the most important components for heat transfer, so as to realize energy saving and emission reduction. Hence, its configuration and thermal performance should be intensively studied. In this paper, a new configuration of heat exchanger, whose heat transfer area is regular octagon, is designed in comparison with the pervious rectangle one. In order to improve average temperature and thermal distribution uniformity, typical CFD software named FLUENT is used to simulate the multi-coupling of temperature - fluid - solid, and the temperature distribution on heat transfer area is gained. Moreover, the temperature distribution will be analyzed to evaluate the merits and weaknesses of configuration and thermal performance.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2592
Dhaminda Hewavitarane, Sadami Yoshiyama, Hisashi Wadahama, Xin Li
Abstract High temperature liquids held in a subcooled state are capable of storing large amounts of energy and then explosively releasing this energy when depressurized in a phase change process known as “Flashing”. The rapid volume expansion that results from this flashing has been harnessed to drive an expansion engine working on a cycle called “The Superheated Liquid Flash, Boiling” (S.L.F.B) cycle. The first stage showed that multiphase convective boiling of the unflashed water off the heated walls of the expansion unit supplemented the Flash work output. Furthermore, Flashing was seen to improve the effectiveness of convective boiling off the walls. The results were shown to be repeatable in a modified piston engine. Convective boiling was again shown to be able to supplement the power output under specific conditions.
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