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2016-04-11 ...
  • April 11-12, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 17-18, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) and Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) technology model offerings and production volumes continue to accelerate with each model year. Advanced technology vehicle populations are significantly increasing throughout the world, making it vital for engineers, technicians, and educators to have a thorough understanding of these technologies and systems.
2015-12-07 ...
  • December 7-8, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Norwalk, California
  • March 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Tysons, Virginia
  • June 13-14, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Norwalk, California
  • October 24-25, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Warrendale, Pennsylvania
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The task of certifying an aircraft or part can be overwhelming given the lengthy process and the many steps that are required. Understanding the process can greatly enhance the outcome and reduce unnecessary delays or frustrations. This course will provide an overview of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) organizational structure, its policies, guidelines and requirements leading to Type and Supplemental Type airworthiness approvals. It will also cover the rule-making process and rules applicable to aircraft parts and products.
2015-10-08 ...
  • October 8-9, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • July 28-29, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.) - Tysons, Virginia
  • December 1-2, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Note: Last day of class ends at approximately 12:30 pm In today’s highly competitive and liability minded environment, Design Reviews (DR) are a must for all major mobility industries such as Automotive, DOD, Aerospace, Agriculture, Recreation, Marine and Rail. While Design Reviews are becoming increasingly important in product liability litigation, they also serve as an effective way to transfer organizational best practices for specific concerns and issues.
2015-10-06
Event
Cost Reduction & Quality Improvement: Increases in Material, Variable, and Plant costs are greatly impacting manufacturing companies’ bottom-line. The impact on bottom-line is so much that ‘Cost’ has quickly become the number one competitor for most manufacturers and consequently ‘Cost Reduction’ is one of the most challenging platforms today. Better quality means customer satisfaction which leads to business growth and customer loyalty.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2886
Kebing Tang, Li He, Yao Zhao
The development of a new Dongfeng Heavy truck had very strict targets for fuel consumption. As the aerodynamic drag plays a crucial role for the fuel consumption, a low drag value had to be achieved. It was therefore essential to include evaluation and optimization of the aerodynamics in the development process. Because wind tunnel facilities were not available, the complete aerodynamics development was based on digital simulation. The major portion of the aerodynamic optimization was carried out during the styling phase where mirrors, sun visor, front bumper and aero devices were optimized for drag reduction. For optimizing corner vanes and mud guards, self-soiling from the wheel spray was included in the analysis. The aero results did also show that cooling air flow rates are sufficiently high to ensure proper cooling. During the detailed engineering phase an increase of the drag above the target required further optimization work to finally reach the target.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2860
Xinyu Ge, Jonathan Jackson
The application of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in automotive industry can dramatically reshape the industry. In past decades, many Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) applied neural network and pattern recognition technologies to power train calibration, emission prediction and virtual sensor development. The AI application is mostly focused on reducing product development and validation cost. AI technologies in these applications demonstrate certain cost-saving benefits, but are far from disruptive effect. The disruptive impact can be realized when AI application finally bring cost-saving benefits directly to end users. For example, automation of vehicle or machine operation can dramatically improve the efficiency. However, there is still a gap between the current technologies and the one that can fully enable the vehicle or machine intelligence including reasoning, knowledge, planning and self-learning.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2864
Xinyu Ge, Jarrett Corcoran, Paul Gamble
With stringent emission regulations, many subsystems that abate engine tailpipe-out emission become necessary part for engines. With the increased levels of complexity, end users also require increased level of quality for modern engines. Among the spectrum of quality control methodologies, one extreme example is focused on very components’ quality to ensure the accumulative deviation is within predetermined limits. These measures tighten the component tolerance during manufacturing process and typically results in increased cost. Another extreme example is on the other side of the methodologies spectrum. The methodology is to tailor the engine calibration solution to offset the manufacturing difference. Although the tailored engine calibration solution reduces manufacturing cost for components, it increases the calibration and validation cost for engines. Given the cost and time constraints, system integration plays an important role in engine development.
2015-09-23
Event
This session will explore the active and proposed safety initiatives for the aerospace industry. Discussions on probability assessments of fuel tank structural features, safety of civil aircraft from Russian experience, textile based baggage containers for onboard blast protection and a module for accomodating emergency equipment will be highlighted.
2015-09-23
Event
The future of safety of Aerospace Systems Engineering and Design requires advanced research on safety issues of increasingly complex airspace systems. These sessions will provide a forum for international discussion and information on leading-edge research and developments associated with safety \with advanced and integrated validation and verification procedures on airspace systems.
2015-09-22
Event
The future of safety of Aerospace Systems Engineering and Design requires advanced research on safety issues of increasingly complex airspace systems. These sessions will provide a forum for international discussion and information on leading-edge research and developments associated with safety \with advanced and integrated validation and verification procedures on airspace systems.
2015-09-22
Event
This session will explore the active and proposed safety initiatives for the aerospace industry. Discussions on probability assessments of fuel tank structural features, safety of civil aircraft from Russian experience, textile based baggage containers for onboard blast protection and a module for accomodating emergency equipment will be highlighted.
2015-09-22
Event
This session will explore the active and proposed safety initiatives for the aerospace industry. Discussions on probability assessments of fuel tank structural features, safety of civil aircraft from Russian experience, textile based baggage containers for onboard blast protection and a module for accomodating emergency equipment will be highlighted.
2015-09-22
Event
The future of Airspace Systems Operations requires research, development and integration of new concept elements to satisfy the increase in air traffic demand, safety and efficiency of complex airspace systems. These sessions will provide a forum for international discussion and information on leading-edge research and developments associated with air traffic flow management and advanced airspace systems analysis and operations.
2015-09-22
Event
The future of Airspace Systems Operations requires research, development and integration of new concept elements to satisfy the increase in air traffic demand, safety and efficiency of complex airspace systems. These sessions will provide a forum for international discussion and information on leading-edge research and developments associated with air traffic flow management and advanced airspace systems analysis and operations.
2015-09-21 ...
  • September 21-22, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Seattle, Washington
  • January 25-26, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Norwalk, California
  • May 9-10, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Tysons, Virginia
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The September offering of this seminar will be conducted at the Sheraton Seattle Hotel and held in conjunction with the SAE 2015 AeroTech Congress & Exhibition. Register for this offering and you can register to attend the SAE 2015 AeroTech Congress & Exhibition for 25% off the classic member event rate. Please contact our Customer Service department at +1.877.606.7323 (U.S. and Canada only) or +1.724.776.4970 (outside U.S. and Canada) to register for SAE 2015 AeroTech Congress & Exhibition at this special rate.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2445
Hartmut Hintze, Ralf God
The increasing functionality associated with the rising complexity of aircraft cabin systems which are used by cabin crew, passengers, maintenance staff and other stakeholders, requires a reconsideration of the methods for the development of aircraft cabin systems. This paper deals with a model-based security engineering approach based on the so called three-V-model [1] as an appropriate process model, which represents the governing system engineering process (SEP) associated with the safety engineering process (SafEP) and the security engineering process (SecEP). All three processes are pursued concurrently and are interacting reciprocally by working within the same system model on each development level. We describe in detail the involved model-based security engineering activities of the SecEP and the integration of the CORAS risk analysis method [2] in a consistent System Modeling Language (SysML) approach.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2447
John Low
The development of the Electrical Wire Interconnection System, or EWIS, for today’s advanced aircraft is one of the most complicated engineering activities around. In addition to having to respond to very high rates of change during development, the aircraft are continually evolving in electronic and electrical content along the entire lifecycle. Relatively new mandates such as the CFR Part 25 Subpart H EWIS have put additional demands on aircraft OEMs and their key suppliers, forcing companies to reassess their design practices and methodologies. This paper will investigate how a systems engineering approach to the development of the electrical wiring systems can enable and facilitate a more efficient EWIS methodology.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2448
Steve Trythall
Meeting aerospace configuration control mandates involves a host of issues such as data access control, configuration context including effectivity and release management, just to name a few factors. Design tools must assist organizations and individual designers with this myriad of challenges instead of relying on the PLM environment to identify and sort out issues during data release. The recent advancements of the model-based development (MBD) process puts much more emphasis on the actual data instead of simply drawings. This paper explores how many leading aerospace OEMs are adopting new capabilities for the designers during the development process in an effort to mitigate errors related to data inconsistencies.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2439
Martin Hunter
It is generally accepted that the development of hardware and software for safety critical systems follow their own lifecycles as defined by standards such as RTCA DO254 and RTCA DO178C. What is less clear, is what should be done to ensure the system safety objectives are met when the software is installed in the electronic hardware. This paper seeks to discuss the activities that may be undertaken do demonstrate not only that the integration of the software and hardware "work" together, but they do so in a manner that meets the safety objectives in line with the guidance in SAE ARP4754A. According to ARP 4754A, hardware and software are different “items” developed according to their own requirements and standards, when two or more items are brought together, they are a system, which may be part of a larger system. Therefore system level considerations need to be applied from the beginning of the development program addressing the system safety and certification activities.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2401
Michael Schmidt, Philipp Nguyen, Mirko Hornung
The projected uptick in world passenger traffic challenges the involved stakeholder to optimise the current aviation system and to find new solutions being able to cope with this trend, since especially large hub airports are congested and operate at their capacity limit. Delays due to late arrival of aircraft or unreliable and inefficient ground operation processes would disrupt the airport operations tremendously. Various concepts improving the current turnaround processes have been presented thus far, whereby radical aircraft design changes have little chances for realization. Based on a clustering of aircraft interfaces, such as doors and services panels, for state-of-the-art passenger aircraft, concepts targeting to reduce the required resources and time are presented. By maintaining the established overall aircraft configuration, the concepts promote higher probability to become commercially available for aircraft manufactures and operators.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2438
Robert E. Voros
Aerospace Recommended Practice 4754 Revision A (ARP4754A), “Guidelines for Development of Civil Aircraft and Systems,” and ARP4761, “Guidelines and Methods for Conducting the Safety Assessment Process on Civil Airborne Systems and Equipment,” together describe a complex set of intertwining processes which comprehensively prioritize development activities for a product’s systems based on their safety criticality. These processes work at specific levels of detail (aircraft and system) and interact with a set of processes at lower levels of detail (item) defined by Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) standards. The aircraft and system development process (ARP4754A) supplies functions, requirements, and architectural definitions to the system safety process (ARP4761), which in turn supplies Development Assurance Levels back to the development process and on to the RTCA processes.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2431
Robert E. Voros
Aerospace Recommended Practice 4754 Revision A (ARP4754A), “Guidelines for Development of Civil Aircraft and Systems,” is recognized through Advisory Circular 20-174 (AC 20-174) as a way (but not the only way) to provide development assurance for aircraft and systems to minimize the possibility of development errors. ARP4754A and its companion, Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 6110, “Contiguous Aircraft/System Development Process Example,” primarily describe development processes for an all new, complex and highly integrated aircraft without strong consideration for reused systems or simple systems. While ARP4754A section 5 mention reuse, similarity, and complexity, and section 6 is intended to cover modification programs, the descriptions in these sections can be unclear and inconsistent. The majority of aircraft projects are normally not completely new products nor are they entirely comprised of complex and highly-integrated systems.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2452
Vicki S. Johnson
The Systems Engineering (SE) “Vee” is generally recognized as one of the primary identifying features of systems engineering processes. While there are many specifications which include SE in their titles and show a version of the “Vee” in their process descriptions, there are other specifications which make no claim to be an SE standard but show a “Vee” describing the processes in the specification. There are also specifications which appear at first glance to be completely unrelated to SE but, perhaps, accidently, describe processes which are very much SE. This wide variety of documents leads to a question of the possibility of identifying the common core which composes SE (the soul of systems engineering)? And how would using that core make for more robust processes which could better meet the needs of systems today and into the future (e.g., Unmanned Aerial Vehicles or Multi-vehicle Space Transport Systems).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2875

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