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Viewing 1 to 30 of 19017
2017-01-24
Event
2016-10-24 ...
  • October 24-25, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are now commonly used in automotive body structural applications. The high strength of this grade classification is attractive to help reduce mass in the automotive body through reduction in thickness. Strength also supports improvements in safety requirements so that mass increases are minimized. In some specific grades of AHSS, energy absorption is possible in addition to the high strength. This course will review the definition and properties of AHSS and cover several common applications in automotive body structures.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2125
Henry Hameister
This paper presents an approach to how existing production systems can benefit from Industry 4.0 driven concepts. This attempt is based on a communication gateway and a cloud-based system, that hosts all algorithms and models to calculate a prediction of the tool wear. Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding is a sub-section of friction welding, where a rotating tool that consists out of three parts is used to heat up material to a dough-like state. Since Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding produces a selective dot-shaped connection of overlapping materials, the production requirements are similar to riveting or resistance spot welding. In contrast to other bonding techniques, Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding can be integrated within the production process without major interferences or changes.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2129
Antonio Rubio, Luis Calleja, Javier Orive, Ángel Mújica, Asunción Rivero
Aluminum skin milling is a very challenging process due to the high quality requirements needed in the aeronautic and aerospace industries. Nowadays, on these markets, there are just two technological approaches able to face the manufacturing of this sort of wide thin blanks: chemical and mechanical milling by means of highly complex machines. Both solutions lead to a high investment requirement that affect directly on the application profitability on these industrial sectors. This paper presents a flexible machining system that allows milling skin shaped parts within required tolerances by means of an innovative universal holding fixture combined with an adaptive toolpath development. This flexible holding fixture can be adapted to the required shape and can hold uniformly the whole sheet surface. Besides, the solution includes an implementation that can adapt the machining toolpath by means of the skin thickness online measurement.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-2126
Ali Mohamed Abdelhafeez, Sein Leung Soo, David Aspinwall, Anthony Dowson PhD, Dick Arnold
Despite the increasing use of carbon fibre reinforced plastic (CFRP) composites, titanium and aluminium alloys still constitute a significant proportion of modern civil aircraft structures, which are primarily assembled via mechanical joining techniques. Drilling of fastening holes is therefore a critical operation, which has to meet stringent geometric tolerance and integrity criteria. The paper details the development of a three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model for drilling aerospace grade aluminium (AA7010-T7451 and AA2024-T351) and titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloys. The FE simulation employed a Coupled Eulerian Lagrangian (CEL) technique. The cutting tool was modelled according to a Lagrangian formulation in which the mesh follows the material displacement while the workpiece was represented by a non-translating and material deformation independent Eulerian mesh.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1942
Sarah Chen, Steve Hoxie
Developing a brake system with high overall customer satisfaction rating is a constant challenge for OEMs as well as their brake suppliers. Brake system performance is directly linked to the engagement between the rotor and pads. The materials for the rotors and pads play a key role in the nature of the engagement. Therefore, it is critical to have a good understanding of brake rotor materials to meet performance targets. Due to its superior thermal handling capacity, damping characteristics, wear and cost advantages, gray iron is the most widely used brake rotor material in the industry. G30 per ASTM A48 is generally specified for most brake rotors with minimum tensile strength of 200 Mpa and Brinell hardness of 187~241. G20 is also widely used for brake rotors, especially when people are looking for brake smoothness and optimal pad life. This study has found that variation in gray iron material can considerably affect brake output, wear, DTV, BTV, and noise propensity.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1937
Taylor Erva, Adam Loukus, Luke Luskin
Aluminum metal matrix composite brake rotors with a selective ceramic function reinforcement gradient (FRG) have been developed for automotive applications. This paper will highlight the design, manufacturing, and testing of the rotors. Weight saving of an aluminum composite rotor in comparison to an industry standard cast iron rotor is 50-60%. With this material change comes design considerations to manage rotor temperature, rotor surface integrity, and friction. Manufacturing methods to meet these design constraints were needed to develop a viable high performance aluminum composite rotor. High pressure squeeze casting with soluble coring techniques were developed to incorporate the selective FRG MMC rotors. Dynamometer testing was performed, concentrating on brake friction and temperature to evaluate the macro and micro interfaces in the rotors.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1957
Seonho Lee, Heejae Kang, Ohchul Kwon, Chirl Soo Shin
A trend in automotive parts development is the pursuit of long life, high quality and reliability. The increase in service life of automotive wheel bearings, by improving the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of bearing steels, was investigated. Conventional studies of bearing steels and heat treatments have dealt with quenching and tempering (Q/T) in 52100 steel. This study is a new trial to increase the strength of bearing steels by special austempering in phases after general Q/T heat treatments.
2016-09-16
Technical Paper
2016-01-9017
Dr Janka Cafolla, Derick Smart, Barry Warner
The lifting and excavating industry are not as advanced as automotive in the use of modern CAE tools in the early stages of design and development of heavy machinery. There is still a lack of confidence in the integrity of the results from FE simulations and optimisation and this becomes a barrier to the adoption of virtual prototyping for vehicle verification. R&D of Tata Steel has performed tests on two forklift truck overhead guards supplied by a major manufacturer. Based on the international standard for Falling Object Protective Structures (FOPS) as an initial input to the method of testing, the main aim of this study was to generate as much test data as possible to correlate the Finite Element (FE) simulations of two tests - a static and a dynamic test. The static test was developed to deform the overhead guard plastically in a slow controlled manner, so it would be easier to correlate the measured data to FE simulation.
2016-07-22
WIP Standard
AS4877F

This procurement specification covers bolts and screws made from a corrosion and heat resistant, age hardenable nickel base alloy of the type identified under the Unified Numbering System as UNS N07718.

2016-07-21
Standard
AMS4359
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded rods, bars, and profiles (shapes) 0.040 to 1.500 inches (1.02 to 38.10 mm), inclusive, in thickness, and produced with maximum cross sectional area of 23.25 in2 (15000 mm2) and a maximum circumscribing circle diameter (circle size) of 15.5 inches (394 mm) (see 8.4.1).
2016-07-13
WIP Standard
AMS4367
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded rods, bars, and profiles (shapes) produced with maximum cross sectional area of 55.5 square inches (35 806 mm2) and a maximum circumscribing circle diameter (circle size) or 24.4 inches (620 mm)
2016-07-13
WIP Standard
AMS4374
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded rods, bars, and profiles (shapes) produced with maximum cross sectional area of 56.1 square inches (36 193 mm2) and a maximum circumscribing circle diameter (circle size) or 20.2 inches (513 mm)
2016-07-13
Standard
AS1576E
This document defines the requirements for weld fittings and machine weldments using an orbiting welding head suitable for use on cold worked 3Al 2.5V titanium, 21Cr 6Ni 9Mn CRES, and 718 nickel alloy tubing. Fitting standards covered by this specification include non-separable welded elbow, tee, and reducer fittings, and reconnectable 24 degree cone fittings such as sleeves and unions.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 19017

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