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Viewing 1 to 30 of 18636
2016-04-12
Event
This symposium provides a forum for researchers and application engineers to disseminate the knowledge and information gained in the area of advanced high-strength and press-hardening steel development and applications in automotive structures, enabling light-weight and durable vehicles with improved safety.
2016-04-12
Event
This session will feature the latest developments in sheet metal forming technology. We seek contributions in the general areas of forming processes, formability issues and modeling. Topics of particular interest include: • Forming Processes: Stamping, hydroforming, gas forming, high temperature forming, etc. • Formability Issues: Springback, edge cracking, stretch-bend failures and fracture. • Modeling: Material models, forming limits, failure criteria in various deformation modes and process modeling & optimization.
2016-01-26
Event
2015-11-11
Event
2015-10-29 ...
  • October 29-30, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Preventing future problems and troubleshooting existing problems in today's stamping plants requires greater stamping process knowledge. The link between inputs and outputs isn't as clear as many think, increasing the need for detailed understanding of the variables involved. This course discusses the key inputs and outputs associated with sheet metal stamping, including important elements for controlling the process and making it more robust. The course reviews sheet metal characteristics and their application, especially from a formability standpoint, using many automotive-related examples.
2015-09-27
Technical Paper
2015-01-2666
Scott Lambert
The Global Brake Safety Council sees an increase in disc brake pads that are prematurely replaced before the end of the friction lining life cycle, due to: Rust related issues such as separation of friction lining from the disc brake shoe Fluctuation in critical dimensions A leading cause for both issues is the use of mill scale steel, or ‘black steel’ (non-pickled and oiled). In the North American aftermarket, as there are little or no steel specifications for disc brake shoes, black steel is increasingly used. GBSC conducted research of discarded disc brake pads from job-shops and engaged in discussions with metallurgists, major pad manufacturers and OE brake foundation engineers to identify root causes of premature pad replacement and the effects of black steel used for disc brake shoe manufacturing. Mill scale is embedded in and around the bond line of the friction lining and the disc brake shoe, causing a weaker bond, susceptible to rust jacking.
2015-09-27
Technical Paper
2015-01-2683
Sarah Chen, Steve Hoxie
Developing a quiet brake system has been a constant task for OEM as well as their brake suppliers. Squeal problems may taint the image of a car manufacturer and cause substantial revenue loss from warranty claims despite the fact that the brake remains fully functional and safe. As a major component in the brake system, the rotor plays significant role in brake noise performance. Because of the cost and damping property advantages, gray iron is still the most widely used material for brake rotor application. When pads/rotor coupling is looked at to minimize noise issues, however, most efforts have been on pads and insulators. Rotor specifications are rather general and the component is typically accepted based on grades defined by mechanical property minimum (mostly in G3000 SAE J431).
2015-09-23
Event
The need for more innovative technologies towards lowering the cost and cycle time for drilling, fastening, and assembly of hybrid metal/composite structures has created a sense of urgency in the airplane manufacturing field. This session covers methods, tools, and technologies to enable manufacturability of hybrid joints while factoring in the most economical methods. Tools and techniques to improve drilling and assembly of the hybrid metal/composite will be addressed.
2015-09-23
Event
Advancements in the production of metallic structure continue to be important to the aerospace and commercial aviation industries. This session features improved materials, processes, and joining methods for metallic components to meet the challenges put forth by demanding end product requirements.
2015-09-23
Event
The need for more innovative technologies towards lowering the cost and cycle time for drilling, fastening, and assembly of hybrid metal/composite structures has created a sense of urgency in the airplane manufacturing field. This session covers methods, tools, and technologies to enable manufacturability of hybrid joints while factoring in the most economical methods. Tools and techniques to improve drilling and assembly of the hybrid metal/composite will be addressed.
2015-09-22
Event
Advancements in the production of metallic structure continue to be important to the aerospace and commercial aviation industries. This session features improved materials, processes, and joining methods for metallic components to meet the challenges put forth by demanding end product requirements.
2015-09-15
Event
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2500
Brigitte Vasques
The drilling of multi layers composite stacks remains a common process in aerospace industry. Research of productive solutions such as one shot and dry drilling operations to avoid reaming and lubrication are contemplated by aerospace customers on titanium multi layers composite applications. Those solutions permit to reduce the number of finishing operation and drilling time. Special ADEs (Advanced Drilling Equipment) machines are used to drill aircraft components in limited access areas. Parameters such as cutters, ADE machines type, rigidity clamping, cutting conditions, speed, feed, chip fragmentation and extraction are related and influence the holes quality. Titanium (TA6V) thickness and cutting configuration influence the cutter wear development. In this work, ADE and specific cutter geometries developed by Apex are used for the one shot dry drilling of titanium. Carbide cutters have been chosen for their resistance to the heat developed by titanium drill.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2514
Scott Tomchick, Joshua Elrod, Dave Eckstein, James Sample, Dan Sherick
Abstract A new automated production system for installation of Lightweight Groove Proportioned (LGP) and Hi-Lock bolts in wing panels has been implemented in the Boeing 737 wing manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington. The system inserts LGP and Hi-Lok bolts into interference holes using a ball screw mechanical squeeze process supported by a back side rod-locked pneumatic clamp cylinder. Collars are fed and loaded onto a swage die retaining pin, and swaging is performed through ball screw mechanical squeeze. Offset and straight collar tools allow the machine to access 99.9% of fasteners in 3/16″, ¼″ and 5/16″ diameters. Collar stripping forces are resolved using a dynamic ram inertial technique that reduces the pull on the work piece. Titanium TN nuts are fed and loaded into a socket with a retaining spring, and installed on Hi-Loks Hi-Lok with a Bosch right angle nut runner.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2501
Cosme de Castelbajac, Sylvain Laporte, Julian Lonfier, Emmanuel Puviland
Abstract Over the last few years, many aircraft production lines have seen their production rate increase. In some cases, to avoid bottlenecks in the assembly lines, the productivity of processes needs to be improved while keeping existing machine-tools. In this context, the case of drilling machine-tools tends to require particular attention, especially when multi-material parts are drilled. In such instances, the Vibration Assisted Drilling (VAD) process can be a way to improve productivity and reliability while keeping quality standards. This article presents a case of a drilling/countersinking process for stainless steel and titanium stack parts. Firstly, the article assesses the feasibility and benefits of using Vibration Assisted Drilling and Countersinking with the current cutting-tools.
2015-09-15
Journal Article
2015-01-2621
Douglas Leicht
Abstract Aviation regulations requires that engine mounts, and other flight structures located in designated fire zones must be constructed of fireproof material so that they are capable of withstanding the effects of fire. Historically, steel is defined as being inherently fireproof, however, titanium was not. Therefore, a fireproof test was conducted using 6AL-4V titanium structure for the attachment of the propulsion system on a mid-size business jet to satisfy FAA Federal Aviation Requirement 25.865. To determine if the titanium structure would be able to support normal operating loads during the fire event, finite element analysis was performed on the titanium structure simulating the fire test. The fire test simulates a fire on the aircraft from the propulsion system by using a burner with jet fuel exposing the component to a 2000 °F (1093°C) flame. The 2000 °F (1093°C) Flame is calibrated based on FAA Advisory Circular AC20-135.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2605
Jamnie Yazmín Achem Calahorra, Hilda E. Esparza Ponce, Patricia Zambrano Robledo, Facundo Almeraya Calderón, Citlalli Gaona Tiburcio
Abstract Thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering are review in terms of their potential and present uses in the aircraft industry. The aircraft alloys substrates were Ti-6Al-4V and Incoloy 800HT, using a target of yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) with nominal composition of 8% Y2O3 (wt%) and the remainder of ZrO2. The chemical composition of the films was determined by X-ray energy dispersion (EDS). The electrochemical noise behavior show that the coatings decreased propagation of pitting, leading to a state of passivation or uniform corrosion, and also possess superior corrosion resistance over the individually substrates.
2015-09-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2613
Douglas Leicht, Kirk Olsen
Abstract 15-5PH is a precipitation-hardening, martensitic stainless steel used for primary structural elements such as engine mounts where corrosion resistance, high strength, good fatigue and fracture toughness is required. The material composition is defined in AMS5659M. This alloy can be either Type 1 - vacuum arc remelt (VAR) or Type 2 - electro slag remelt (ESR) and is most commonly heat treated per SAE AMS-H-6875 or AMS2759/3 to condition H1025 (an ultimate tensile strength of 155 ksi [1070 MPa] minimum). Typically material handbooks have limited fatigue data and most data is only for Type 1. Therefore, the fatigue properties of 15-5PH H1025 stainless steel for both Type 1 and Type 2 were determined. The objective of the fatigue testing was to generate a family of S-N curves (maximum stress versus number of cycles to failure) for a series of stress ratios across the entire range of cycles to failure.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 18636

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