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Viewing 1 to 30 of 10076
2015-06-09
Event
The advanced composites community in Australia has been a strong contributor for more than two decades to the research, development and production of carbon fibre composite components, particularly for the global aerospace industry. In this presentation a review of current Australian activities in the field will be provided, including the latest on implementing new technologies in areas ranging from oil & gas to aerospace & defence. Particular emphasis will be placed on the transition of research undertaken in the Cooperative Research Centre for Advanced Composite Structures (CRC-ACS) into production.
2015-06-09
Event
This session will focus on the latest technology developments in materials used for aerospace design, from structures to skin, to include new alloys and composites.
2015-06-09
Event
This paper focuses on a case study solution for setting up and monitoring the process capability of machined parts at an aircraft OEM. By creating standardized measurement plans and automating the analysis of the measured output, users can understand individual machine process performance and overall process performance in real time, as well as through automated reporting. By showing outputs and set up, reinforced by customer data, DCS will demonstrate the method of creating actionable reporting and quality tracking for process capability at a major aerospace OEM.
2015-06-09
Event
2015-06-09
Event
2015-05-21
Standard
AMS03_20
This SAE Standard specifies the requirements for the electro-deposition of zinc on non-corrosion resisting steel items for protection against corrosion, and on copper-base alloy items and corrosion resisting steel items for the reduction of contact corrosion of less noble metallic materials. Zinc coatings shall not be used on items which are liable to be subjected to temperatures exceeding 350 °C.
2015-05-21
Standard
AMS03_27
This SAE Standard specifies the requirements for the nickel-plating of ferrous metals, copper alloys, aluminum alloys and zinc alloys for one or more of the following purposes: a. the production of wear-resistant surfaces; b. the building up of worn or over-machined surfaces; c. corrosion resistance; d. to provide an undercoat for subsequent deposits, e.g., chromium.
2015-05-21
Standard
AMS03_25
This SAE Standard specifies the properties of sulphuric acid anodizing of aluminum and aluminum alloys.
2015-05-07
Standard
AMS5503F
This specification covers a corrosion resistant steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
2015-05-06
WIP Standard
AMS2631E
This specification covers the procedure for ultrasonic inspection of wrought titanium and titanium alloy products 0.25 inch (6.4 mm) and over in cross-section (thickness) or diameter.
2015-05-06
Standard
AMSQQA200/8A
This specification covers the specific requirements for aluminum alloy 6061 bar, rod, shapes, tube, and wire produced by extrusion.
2015-04-30
Standard
AMS03_18
This SAE Standard specifies the properties of chromate conversion coatings on aluminum and aluminum alloys. It details inspection and testing requirements for chromate conversion coatings. Where there are differences in the requirements for the Brushing Grade from the Standard Grade they are highlighted in this Standard.
2015-04-28
Standard
J1562_201504
Zinc and zinc-alloy coated steel is used to enhance a structure’s protection against corrosion degradation. For the purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice, a galvanized coating is defined as a zinc or zinc-alloy metallic coating. The selection of the optimum galvanized steel sheet product depends on many factors, the most important being: desired corrosion protection, formability, weldability, surface characteristics, and paintability. The trade-offs of these product characteristics are more complex than is the case with uncoated steel sheet products.
2015-04-27
Standard
AMS03_3
This SAE Standard specifies the requirements for the application of sprayed metal coatings of aluminum, zinc, or aluminum-zinc based alloys for the protection of aluminum alloys against corrosion. It does not cover the metal spraying of aluminum armour materials, which should be treated in accordance with the requirements of Def Stan 08-39.
2015-04-24
WIP Standard
AMS4259B
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet.

This sheet has been used typically for structural parts requiring the strength of 2024-T3 and lower density, but usage is not limited to such applications.

2015-04-17
Video
Inside the turbocharger of your family car is a special material that was also used in the skin of NASA's X-15 rocket plane. In this episode of SAE Eye on Engineering, Senior Editor Lindsay Brooke looks at Inconel, a material commonly used in turbocharger rotors.
2015-04-16
WIP Standard
AMS6440S
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2015-04-16
WIP Standard
AMS6479D
This specification covers a special aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2015-04-16
WIP Standard
AMS6444M
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1356
Atishay Jain
Abstract Conventional motorcycle swingarm design includes steel tubing and sheet metal structures. Conventional swingarm are inherently over-designed as their design comprises of tubular structures of same cross section through the entire length of the swingarm, whereas the stress induced varies along the length (maximum near the frame pivot). An aluminum alloy swingarm design even when subjected to casting manufacturing constraints, has the potential for better material layout and weight minimization. But obtaining an ideal material layout for maximum performance can be a challenge as it requires a number of time consuming design iteration cycles. This paper aims to use concept based design methodology for design of aluminum alloy swing arm by application of topology optimization techniques to meet styling and structural targets and thus, obtain an end user product.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0520
Takaaki Kitahara, Takuo Imai, Osamu Ishigo, Miodrag Perovic
Abstract There has been a requirement for automotive bearings materials to be free of the toxic material lead, in accordance with ELV regulations and from the perspective of environmental problems. Currently, bismuth is used as a replacement for lead in copper alloy based main journal bearings and connecting rod bearings for automotive engines. In recent years, there has been changing to lead-free materials for truck engine bearings. Compared with automotive engines, lots of contaminations in the oil and local contact between the shaft and bearings can occur in truck engines. The ability to tolerate contamination and local contact is therefore required for truck engine bearings. In this development, we find that the addition of 8 mass% bismuth and 1.5 mass% molybdenum carbide particles into copper-tin alloy is effective for improving the ability which allow the contamination and local contacts.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0545
Jeong Kyun Hong
Abstract As the automotive industry seeks to remove weight from vehicle chasses to meet increased fuel economy standards, it is increasingly turning to composites and aluminum. In spite of increasing demands for quality aluminum alloy spot welds that enable more fuel efficient automobiles, fatigue evaluation procedures for such welds are not well-established. This article discusses the results of an evaluation Battelle performed of the fatigue characteristics of aluminum alloy spot welds based on experimental data and observations from the literature. In comparison with spot welds in steel alloys, aluminum alloy spot welds exhibit several significant differences including a different hardness distribution at and around the weld, different fatigue failure modes, and more. The effectiveness and applicability of the Battelle structural stress-based simplified procedure for modeling and simulating automotive spot welds has previously been demonstrated by Battelle investigations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0511
Bradford Johnson, John Henshaw, Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey
Abstract Increasing fuel economy is a high priority of the automotive industry due to consumer demand and government regulations. High strength aluminum alloys such as AA7075-T6 can be used in strength-critical automotive applications to reduce vehicle weight and thus improve fuel economy. However, these aluminum alloys are known to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for thick plate. The level of susceptibility to SCC must be determined before a material is implemented. ASTM standards exist that generate semi-quantitative data primarily for use in screening materials for SCC. For the purposes of this work ASTM G139 (breaking load method) has been used to evaluate sheet AA7075-T6 for use in automotive applications. A tensile fixture applying a constant strain was used to quantitatively measure residual strength of the material after exposure to a corrosive environment.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0687
Guang Wang, Xueyuan Nie, Jimi Tjong
Abstract In order to reduce the weight of an automotive engine, an aluminum (Al) alloy engine block with cast iron liner has been successfully used to replace the gray cast iron engine. For newly emerging Al linerless engine in which the low surface hardness of the aluminum alloy has to be overcome, a few surface processing technologies are used to protect the surface of cylinders. Among them, plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) thermal spraying coating is becoming popular. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is also proposed for increasing the wear resistance of aluminum alloy and reducing the friction between the cylinder and piston. In this work, a PEO coating with a thickness of ∼20 μm was prepared, and a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to study the tribological behavior of the coating at oil lubricant conditions. Different surface roughness of the coating and a large range of the sliding speeds were employed for the tests.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0738
Joseph R. Kish, Zach Cano, Alexandra Kobylecky, Joseph McDermid, Timothy Skszek
Abstract The purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative corrosion assessment of alloys and coating schemes of interest for the fabrication of multi-material lightweight vehicle architectures. Alloys considered for this application included galvanized high strength low alloy steel, aluminum alloy AA6111 and magnesium alloy ZEK100. The coating scheme considered for corrosion protection included a layered paint top-coat scheme that was applied to a pre-treated surface. The pre-treatments included an alloy-specific commercial conversion coating (CC) and a plasma electrolytic deposition (PED) process that was applied only to the ZEK100 material. The corrosion assessment of the scribed coated alloy panels was conducted after 1000 h exposure in the ASTM B117 salt fog environment. Characterization of the mode and extent of corrosion damage observed and the role played by the exposed alloy microstructure utilized both light optical microscopy and electron microscopy.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0702
Bita Ghaffari, Jonathan Dekam, Kevin Haddix, Kimberly Lazarz, Sergey Titov, Roman Maev
Abstract Adhesive bonding technology has gained ever-increasing significance in automotive industry, especially with the growing use of aluminum (Al) alloy body structures. The variability in thicknesses of the metal and adhesive layers, as well as in joint geometry, of automotive components has presented challenges in nondestructive evaluation of adhesive joints. Though these challenges were recently overcome for steel-adhesive joints using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, the difference in acoustic impedances of steel and Al leads to a lack of robustness in utilizing the same algorithm for Al-adhesive joints. Here, we present the results from using a modified version of this technique to inspect Al-adhesive joints in both laboratory and production environments. A 15-MHz, 52-pixel, 10 mm × 10 mm matrix array of ultrasonic transducers was used to obtain ultrasonic pulse echoes from joint interfaces, analysis of which produced C-scan images of the adhesive bead.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0516
Nan Wang, Sergey Golovashchenko, Quochung Le
Abstract Experimental results on influence of trimming conditions on the shape of the sheared surface are combined with the results of stretching sheared samples after trimming. The objective of the research described in this paper is to study the mechanism of fracture initiation and cracks propagation during half-a-dog bone tensile test representing sheared edge stretching condition. One side of the sample had sheared surface obtained by the trimming process while the other side of the sample had a smooth surface. Significant attention was paid to understanding of fracture sources. An interrupted tensile test approach was employed to track fracture initiation and propagation during stretching of sheared surface. The results of the experimental study indicated that multiple sources of fracture were observed in the burr area for trimming with clearances exceeding 10% of the material thickness.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0701
Anupam Vivek, Bert Liu, Daniel Sakkinen, Mark Harris, Glenn Daehn
Abstract Vaporizing Foil Actuators (VFA) are based on the phenomenon of rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils and wires, caused by passage of a capacitor bank driven current on the order of 100 kA. The burst of the conductor is accompanied with a high-pressure pulse, which can be used for working metal at high strain rates. This paper focuses on the use of VFA for collision welding of dissimilar metals, in particular, aluminum and steel. Aluminum alloy 6061 sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched to velocities in excess of 650 m/s with input electrical energy of 8 kJ into 0.0762 mm thick, dog-bone shaped aluminum foil actuators. Target sheets made from dual phase steel (DP780) were impacted with the aluminum flyer sheet, and solid state impact welds were created. During mechanical testing, many samples failed outside the weld area, thereby indicating that the weld was stronger than the parent aluminum.
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