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Viewing 1 to 30 of 9980
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0537
Hong Tae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Xuming Su, Yung-Li Lee, Mingchao Guo, Chonghua Jiang, Zhen Li
Magnesium alloys have low weldability, thus self-piercing rivet (SPR) joint is one of options for joining them. This research investigates the fatigue performance of SPR for magnesium alloys including AZ31, AM30, and AM60. Lap-shear and coach peel specimens for these alloys are fabricated and tested for understanding fatigue performance of the joint. Structural stress – life (S-N) curves are developed with the test results. This approach is validated with simple structural specimens that include three or two joints in each specimen. It is also intensively studied to identify the proper representation of the joint in finite element models.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1356
Atishay Jain
Swingarm, originally known as the swing fork or pivoted fork is a dynamic structural part of the rear suspension of most modern motorcycles. It is used to hold the rear axle firmly, while pivoting vertically on the frame, to allow the suspension to absorb bumps in the road. Driving and braking loads are also transmitted through the swing arm, and thus, it plays a major role in vehicle dynamics. Weight minimization is important in a swingarm as it is largely an unsprung mass. The conventional swingarm design includes steel tubing and sheet metal structures. Due to higher forces near the pivot, conventional swingarm are inherently over-designed as they use tubular structures of same cross section through the entire length of the swingarm. An aluminum alloy swingarm design even when subjected to casting manufacturing constraints, has the potential for better material layout and weight minimization.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0702
Bita Ghaffari, Jonathan Dekam, Kevin Haddix, Kimberly Lazarz, Sergey Titov, Roman Maev
Adhesive bonding technology has gained increased significance in automotive industry, especially with the growing use of aluminum alloy body structures. The variability in thicknesses of the metal and adhesive layers, as well as the variability in joint geometry, of automotive components has presented challenges in nondestructive evaluation of adhesive joints. These issues have recently been resolved for steel-adhesive joints through the use of an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The difference in acoustic impedance of steel and Al, however, leads to a lack of robustness in using the same technique for Al-adhesive joints. In this paper, we present the results from utilizing a modified version of this pulse-echo algorithm to inspect Al-adhesive joints in both laboratory and production environments. A 52-element, 10 mm X 10 mm, 15-MHz matrix array of ultrasonic transducers was used to obtain the echotrains, analysis of which produced a C-scan image of the adhesive bead.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0687
Guang Wang, Jimi Tjong
In order to reduce the weight of an automotive engine, an aluminum alloy engine block without cast iron liner has been successfully used to replace the gray cast iron engine. However, the low surface hardness of the aluminum alloy may cause high wear and friction on the aluminum cylinders. To overcome these drawbacks, a few surface processing technologies are used to protect the surface of cylinders. Among them, plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) thermal spraying coating is becoming popular. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is also proposed for increasing the wear resistance of aluminum alloy and reducing the friction between the cylinder and piston. In this work, a PEO coating with a thickness of 15 um was prepared, and a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to study the tribological behavior of the coating at oil lubricant conditions. Different surface roughness of the coating and a large range of the sliding speeds were employed for the tests.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0573
Tau Tyan, Yu-Kan Hu, Dana Sun, Leonard Shaner, Matt Niesluchowski, Nand Kochhar, Guofei Chen, Ming Shi
Motivated by a combination of increasing consumer demand for fuel efficient vehicles, more stringent greenhouse gas and 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, automotive manufacturers are working to innovate in all areas of vehicle design to optimize fuel efficiency. In addition to improved aerodynamics, enhanced powertrain technologies and alternative fuel vehicles, reducing vehicle weight by using lighter materials has been identified as one of the most important strategies in future vehicle development. Weight reduction in vehicle components, sub-systems and systems not only reduces the energy needed to overcome inertia forces but also can trigger additional mass reduction elsewhere and enable significant mass reduction in full vehicle levels.
2015-01-26
Standard
AMS2419D
This specification covers the engineering requirements for electrodeposition of cadmium-titanium on metal parts and the properties of the deposit.
2015-01-23
WIP Standard
AMS2801C
This specification covers the engineering requirements for heat treatment by part fabricators (users) or their vendors or subcontractors, of parts (See 1.1.2) made from the following titanium alloys: Commercially Pure 6Al-4V(ELI) 3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr 3Al-2.5V 6Al-6V-2Sn 13V-11Cr-3Al 5AI-2.5Sn 6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo 10V-2Fe-3Al 8Al-1Mo-1V 6AI-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo 15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn
2015-01-23
Standard
J411_201501
This SAE Information Report describes the processing and fabrication of carbon and alloy steels. The basic steelmaking process including iron ore reduction, the uses of fluxes, and the various melting furnaces are briefly described. The various types of steels: killed, rimmed, semikilled, and capped are described in terms of their melting and microstructural differences and their end product use. This document also provides a list of the commonly specified elements used to alloy elemental iron into steel. Each element’s structural benefits and effects are also included. A list of the AISI Steel Products Manuals is included and describes the various finished shapes in which steel is produced.
2015-01-22
Standard
AMS4983F
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of forgings 1.00 inch (25.4 mm) and under in nominal cross-sectional thickness and of forging stock any size.
2015-01-20
Standard
AMS7848D
This specification covers a tantalum alloy in the form of bars and rods up through 3.5 inches (88.9 mm), inclusive.
2015-01-17
WIP Standard
AMS5045J
This specification covers a carbon steel in the form of sheet and strip.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4520L
This specification covers a copper alloy in the form of strip. This strip has been used typically for rolled, split bushings, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4986E
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of forgings 4.0 inches (101.6 mm) and under in nominal cross-sectional thickness and of forging stock.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4987E
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of forgings 4.00 inches (101.6 mm) and under in nominal cross-sectional thickness and of forging stock of any size.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS5660L
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel-iron alloy in the form of bars and forgings 5 inches (127 mm) and under, and forging stock of any size.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS7847D
This specification covers a tantalum alloy in the form of sheet, strip, and plate from 0.010 through 0.250 inch (0.25 through 6.35 mm), inclusive.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4090F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of plate. This plate has been used typically for structural applications requiring plate with high strength, moderate fatigue strength, and high fracture-toughness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4930H
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, flash welded rings 4.000 inches (101.60 mm) and under in nominal diameter or distance between parallel sides, and stock for forging or flash welded rings of any size.
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4934G
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of extruded bars, and shapes, flash welded rings up through 3.000 inches (76.20 mm) inclusive, in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides, and stock for flash welded rings of any size..
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4950D
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, and flash welded rings 4.000 inches (101.60 mm) and under in nominal diameter or least distance between parallel sides and of stock for forging or flash welded rings of any size (See 8.6).
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS5708L
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, wire, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading. These products have been used typically for parts, such as bolts and turbine blades, requiring high strength up to 1500 °F (816 °C) and oxidation resistance up to 1750 °F (954 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7849E
This specification covers tantalum in the form of sheet, strip, plate, and foil up through 0.1875 inch (4.75 mm), inclusive.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7912D
This specification covers an aluminum-beryllium alloy in the form of bars, rods, tubing, and shapes consolidated from powder by extrusion.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7913D
This specification covers an aluminum-beryllium alloy in the form of sheet and plate consolidated from powder by extrusion and then rolled.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS5711E
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging, flash welded rings, or heading.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS5704K
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of forgings 3.25 inches (82.6 mm) and under, and forging stock of any size. (See 8.5).
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0035
Krishnan Sadagopan, Somasundaram Suresh Kumar, Arulsivan T, Senthilnathan Karunakaran
Abstract The cylinder head of a diesel engine is a multi-functional entity, decidingthe performance and emission parameters of the engine. It also acts as a structural and sealing member. It accommodates ports for gas exchange process; injectors for combustion process, cooling passages optimized for heat transfer, valve train mechanism, and lubrication circuits and in addition in our case integrated common rail fuel injection pump drive and systems. Aluminum is light weight with benefits. Combustion is direct injection subject to higher thermal and mechanical loads, it must be robust enough to withstand the high operating temperature and peak firing pressure. The design and development of effective Intake and Exhaust Ports remains critical to improve volumetric efficiency. Compactness not only helps in packaging by having optimum LBH but also in making it light.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0066
Aravind Vadiraj, Shashank Tiwari, Ashutosh Dasare
Abstract Mechanical and wear properties of Al alloyed gray cast iron (0.5% and 1.0%) were compared with that of Mo (1.0%) and Cu (0.77%) alloyed gray cast iron in this investigation. All the alloys showed pearlitic microstructure. The graphite morphology varied due to varying chemistry. The fracture surface showed “cabbage” like dimpled morphology indicating the predominant ductile fracture. It was found that the Mo containing cast iron show 25 to 30% higher strength and 6 to 7 times better wear resistance compared to Al containing cast irons. The worn surface showed oxide formation during sliding.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0169
Simhachalam Bade, Lakshmanarao C
Abstract There is a growing need for improved conceptual vehicle designs along with alternative materials to reduce the damage to the passengers and structures in aerospace and automotive industries. The energy absorption characteristics of materials play a major role in designing a safe vehicle for transport. In this paper, compression behavior and energy absorption of aluminum alloy AA6061 and AA7005 tubes in T4 and T6 conditions are investigated by experimental and numerical methods. The AA7005 and AA6061 tubes are solution heat treated and then aged to achieve the final strength in T6 condition. Experimental compression test results have shown improved energy absorption of tubes in T6 condition compared to tubes in T4 condition. There is less variation of energy among the tested samples. The mean load is compared with the results obtained from analytical formulae. Tensile properties have been obtained from tensile tests using UTM for both AA6061 and AA7005 tubes.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS5707M
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, 3.25 inches (82.6 mm) and under and stock of any size for forging and for flash welded rings. (See 8.5).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 9980

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