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Viewing 1 to 30 of 9749
WIP Standard
2014-04-17
Form: This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of an extrusion. Application: This product has been used in aerospace applications requiring a combination of high strength and compressive properties and with good corrosion resistance, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-15
1.1 This specification is used to indicate the resistance to distortion of bare and two-side Alclad, flat sheet aluminum that will be chemically milled (often in the manufacture of aircraft skin panels). 1.2 This specification is intended for bare and two-side Alclad aluminum alloy in the T temper, which is the form of flat sheet having a thickness between 0.032 to 0.249 in. (0.8 to 6.3 mm). 1.3 Product having the capability prescribed by this specification is available in limited quantities and tempers because of the special processing required.
WIP Standard
2014-04-14
This specification would cover an aluminum-lithium alloy in the extruded form. These extrusions are typically used for parts where low density, high mechanical properties and good stress-corrosion resistance are desired but is not limited in usage to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-11
This specification covers one grade of commercially-pure titanium in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
WIP Standard
2014-04-11
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of extruded bars, tubes, and shapes, and of flash welded rings and stock for flash welded rings.
WIP Standard
2014-04-11
This specification covers powdered metal products consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) of titanium alloy powder compacts.
WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.

These products have been used typically for parts, 0.750 inch (19.05 mm) and under in section thickness at time of heat treatment, requiring a through-hardening steel capable of developing hardness as high as 50 HRC when properly hardened and tempered and also parts of greater thickness but requiring proportionately lower hardness, but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of seamless tubing.

This tubing has been used typically for thin wall-thickness sections where minimum tensile strength up to 160 ksi (1103 MPa) is required and where parts may be welded during fabrication, but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers a free-machining, low-alloy steel in the form of round bars 3.50 inches (88.9 mm) and under in nominal diameter.

These bars have been used typically for parts, such as shafts, axles, pins, fasteners, gears, and screw machine parts, which are normally used at hardness of 30 to 36 HRC and which do not require a high degree of ductility, but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, flash welded rings, and stock for forging or flash welded rings.
WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, and forging stock.
WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of welding wire.

This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc and gas-metal-arc welding of low-alloy steels where the joint is capable of being heat treated to a minimum tensile strength up to 180 ksi (1241 MPa), but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers an aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of sheet, strip, and plate.
WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of welding wire.

This wire has been used typically for use as filler metal for gas-tungsten-arc and gas-metal-arc welding of low-alloy steels of similar composition where the weld area is required to have strength comparable to that of the parent metal, but usage is not limited to such applications.

WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers a low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.

These products have been used typically for bearing component requiring a through-hardening steel usually with hardness of approximately 60 HRC and section thickness under 0.50 in. (12.7 mm).

WIP Standard
2014-04-10
This specification covers a premium aircraft-quality, low-alloy steel in the form of bars, forgings, mechanical tubing, and forging stock.
WIP Standard
2014-04-10
A steel grade with improved properties compared to 300M (UTS>300ksi)
Standard
2014-04-08
This specification covers a titanium alloy in the form of sheet and strip up to and including 0.125 inches in thickness. These products have been used typically in applications requiring high strength-to-weight ratio and stability up to 550 °F (288 °C), but usage is not limited to such applications. Parts are typically formed in the solution heat treated condition and subsequently precipitation heat treated to final condition.
WIP Standard
2014-04-03
This specification covers a corrosion and heat-resistant nickel alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas tungsten arc or gas metal arc welding of parts fabricated from alloys of similar or dissimilar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This specification provides a standard set of procedures for sampling and testing to meet the requirements of material specifications for wrought titanium and titanium alloy products except forgings and forging stock. It is applicable to the extent specified in a material specification.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kenji Yamamoto, Noriaki Katori, Kazumi Moroi
Abstract Wear resistance is the important characteristics of cast iron materials for automobile components. Because the phenomenon of wear is a highly complicated mechanism involving many factors such as surface conditions, chemical reactions with lubricants, metals, and physics, it has not been fully explained. Therefore, it will be necessary to confirm and explain the wear mechanism to develop effective improvements. The purpose of this study was to investigate the structural change behavior and effects of alloying elements when the material top surface becomes worn, in order to improve the wear resistance of cylinder liners and other cast iron materials. For this purpose, several types of prototype materials were produced, and the relationship between components and wear resistance was investigated by using a laser microscope for quantitative observation of the degree of pearlite microstructure fineness. The results showed that the addition of Cu and/or Cr reduced the pearlite lamella width and reduced the amount of soft ferrite, improving wear resistance and demonstrating a relationship between the lamella width and hardness.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Nitesh Kumar Soni, Onkar Pradeeprao Bhise, Mangesh Nadkarni
Abstract The effect of notches & mean stress in fatigue of materials has been a subject of wider interest. The current study is focused on alpha-beta Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) which is a common material in aerospace applications. Various mean stress correction approaches are evaluated for notched & un-notched specimens. Life predictions are obtained for a standard test specimen. For the zero mean condition, most approaches predict similar life. However for non-zero mean conditions, significant deviation is observed in life predictions for Titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Walker mean stress correction approach was found to be in close agreement with published test data. Walker constant is a significant parameter which influences life prediction accuracy. Study has been carried out to find suitable values of constant for different standard shapes/forms of raw material used for manufacturing.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Aledoni Keci, Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey
Abstract The aluminum alloy 7075-T6 has the potential to be used for structural automotive body components as an alternative to boron steel. Although this alloy shows poor formability at room temperature, it has been demonstrated that hot stamping is a feasible sheet metal process that can be used to overcome the forming issues. Hot stamping is an elevated temperature forming operation in which a hot blank is formed and quenched within a stamping die. Attaining a high quench rate is a critical step of the hot stamping process and corresponds to maximum strength and corrosion resistance. This work looks at measuring the quench rate of AA7075-T6 by way of three different approaches: water, a water-cooled plate, and a bead die. The water-cooled plate and the bead die are laboratory-scale experimental setups designed to replicate the hot stamping/die quenching process. The results verify that water is the most superior form of quenching, i.e. above 1000°C/s, the bead die quench rate is impressive at 525°C/s, and the water-cooled plate quench rate is marginal at 34°C/s.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Andrey Ilinich, S. George Luckey
Abstract This paper documents the finite element (FE) analysis of a hot stamping process for high strength aluminum sheet. In this process a 7075 blank, heated above its solvus temperature, was simultaneously die quenched and stamped in a room temperature die to form a B-pillar outer reinforcement. Two modeling approaches have been investigated: an isothermal mechanical model and a non-isothermal coupled thermo-mechanical model. The accuracy of each approach was assessed by comparing the predicted strain and thickness distributions to experimental measurements from a formed panel. The coupled thermo-mechanical model provided the most accurate prediction.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Norihiro Hamada, Kiyohiro Suzuki
Abstract ADC12 is one of the common aluminum alloys for automobiles because it has suitable for casting and machining. However, the corrosion resistance of ADC12 is insufficient in comparison with other aluminum alloys. The corrosion depends on chemical composition of aluminum and circumstance around aluminum. It was considered that a crevice such as a seal gap accelerates corrosion rate. Therefore, the corrosion at a sealing gap between ADC12 and rubber gasket was investigated. Salt water corrosion tests were carried out with an o-ring compressed between ADC12 plate and plastic plate. Corrosion depth and corrosion area at sealing surface were measured with a microscope. The corrosion depth at the sealing surface was deeper than that outside it. Since smooth surface of aluminum prevented the sealing surface from corrosion, it was considered that the narrow sealing gap enabled to decrease in the corrosion rate.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Guang Wang, Xueyuan Nie
Abstract Aluminum engines have been successfully used to replace heavy gray cast engines to lighten the car's weight and reduce the fuel consumption. To overcome the aluminum alloys' poor wear resistance, cast iron liners and thermal spraying coatings were used as cylinder bore materials for wear protection. A plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique had also been proposed to produce an oxide coating on aluminum cylinder bore. The oxide coating can have a low coefficient of friction (COF) and minimum wear shown in the lab tests. To conserve more fuel, the stopping and restarting system was introduced when the vehicle was forced to stop immediately for a short time. When the engine was forced to stop and restart, the reciprocating speed of the piston was very slow, and the friction between the piston and the cylinder was high. In this research, a pin-on-disc tribometer was used to investigate tribological behavior of the oxide coating on an aluminum alloy. The rotational velocity of the tribometer was increased stepwise in a low speed range during the tests.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Joy H Forsmark
Abstract High ductility cast aluminum alloys are seeing more use in vehicles as a greater effort is made to replace components made from heavier steel and iron alloys with lighter weight alloys such as aluminum. High ductility cast aluminum has significant advantages by allowing for complex shape and considerable consolidation of parts in body structures. However, joining can be a challenge because one popular method for aluminum joining, self-piercing riveting (SPR), requires a ductility of greater than 10%, forcing the common high ductility Al alloys to undergo a T6 heat treatment which adds cost and potential distortion issues to Al component. In this study, friction stir spot welding was investigated as a potential joining technique for this material in the as-cast condition. Samples of as-cast Aural-2™ alloy were joined to Aural-2™, 5754, and 6061 alloys, to determine the manufacturing feasibility, weld strength, and fatigue strength using this joining technique.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 9749

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