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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3170
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1356
Atishay Jain
Abstract Conventional motorcycle swingarm design includes steel tubing and sheet metal structures. Conventional swingarm are inherently over-designed as their design comprises of tubular structures of same cross section through the entire length of the swingarm, whereas the stress induced varies along the length (maximum near the frame pivot). An aluminum alloy swingarm design even when subjected to casting manufacturing constraints, has the potential for better material layout and weight minimization. But obtaining an ideal material layout for maximum performance can be a challenge as it requires a number of time consuming design iteration cycles. This paper aims to use concept based design methodology for design of aluminum alloy swing arm by application of topology optimization techniques to meet styling and structural targets and thus, obtain an end user product.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0702
Bita Ghaffari, Jonathan Dekam, Kevin Haddix, Kimberly Lazarz, Sergey Titov, Roman Maev
Abstract Adhesive bonding technology has gained ever-increasing significance in automotive industry, especially with the growing use of aluminum (Al) alloy body structures. The variability in thicknesses of the metal and adhesive layers, as well as in joint geometry, of automotive components has presented challenges in nondestructive evaluation of adhesive joints. Though these challenges were recently overcome for steel-adhesive joints using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, the difference in acoustic impedances of steel and Al leads to a lack of robustness in utilizing the same algorithm for Al-adhesive joints. Here, we present the results from using a modified version of this technique to inspect Al-adhesive joints in both laboratory and production environments. A 15-MHz, 52-pixel, 10 mm × 10 mm matrix array of ultrasonic transducers was used to obtain ultrasonic pulse echoes from joint interfaces, analysis of which produced C-scan images of the adhesive bead.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0515
Haiou Jin, Yimin Zeng, Jie Liang, M.S. Kozdras
Abstract New aluminum alloys, based on a commercial Al-Mn-Cu brazing sheet core alloy, with increasing alloying element Mg up to 2 wt.%, have been developed for automotive heat exchanger units in service at above 200°C. The new Al-Mn-Cu-Mg alloys are to be used as the core material in brazing sheets for vacuum and nickel brazing technologies. They were DC cast to 3.75″ lab sized ingots, scalped, re-heated to 520°C, hot rolled to 4.8 - 5mm, and cold rolled down to a final gauge of 1mm. It has been demonstrated by various mechanical and corrosion testing that Mg contributes a strong solid solution hardening effect at both the room and elevated temperatures, without damaging the other mechanical properties or corrosion resistance. Hence the alloys with 1 - 2 wt.% Mg are able to maintain high yield strength above 60 MPa at 200 - 300°C, with no reduction in formability and very limited decrease in corrosion resistance.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0514
Sugrib K. Shaha, Frank Czerwinski, Wojciech Kasprzak, Jacob Friedman, Daolun Chen
Abstract The uniaxial compression test was used to assess the influence of strain amount on the behavior of precipitates and texture of the Al-7%Si-1%Cu-0.5%Mg alloy, modified with micro-additions of V, Zr and Ti. As revealed through metallographic examinations, fracturing and re-orientation of the second-phase particles increased with increasing compression strain. However, the intermetallic particles experienced substantially more frequent cracking than the eutectic silicon. The crystallographic texture was measured and correlated with deformation behavior of the alloy. The weak texture of 11<211> and 111<110> components, detected after casting transformed to a mixture of 1<110>, 112<110> and 111<110> components after room-temperature compression deformation. The intensity of the texture components depended on the strain amount. It is concluded that the texture formation in the studied alloy is controlled by the precipitates formed during solidification of the alloy.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0516
Nan Wang, Sergey Golovashchenko, Quochung Le
Abstract Experimental results on influence of trimming conditions on the shape of the sheared surface are combined with the results of stretching sheared samples after trimming. The objective of the research described in this paper is to study the mechanism of fracture initiation and cracks propagation during half-a-dog bone tensile test representing sheared edge stretching condition. One side of the sample had sheared surface obtained by the trimming process while the other side of the sample had a smooth surface. Significant attention was paid to understanding of fracture sources. An interrupted tensile test approach was employed to track fracture initiation and propagation during stretching of sheared surface. The results of the experimental study indicated that multiple sources of fracture were observed in the burr area for trimming with clearances exceeding 10% of the material thickness.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0556
Wenkai Li, Haitao Cui, Weidong Wen, Xuming Su, Carlos Engler-Pinto
Abstract Ultrasonic fatigue tests (testing frequency around 20 kHz) have been conducted on four different cast aluminum alloys each with a distinct composition, heat treatment, and microstructure. Tests were performed in dry air, laboratory air and submerged in water. For some alloys, the ultrasonic fatigue lives were dramatically affected by the environment humidity. The effects of different factors like material composition, yield strength, secondary dendrite arm spacing and porosity were investigated; it was concluded that the material strength may be the key factor influencing the environmental humidity effect in ultrasonic fatigue testing. Further investigation on the effect of chemical composition, especially copper content, is needed.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0545
Jeong Kyun Hong
Abstract As the automotive industry seeks to remove weight from vehicle chasses to meet increased fuel economy standards, it is increasingly turning to composites and aluminum. In spite of increasing demands for quality aluminum alloy spot welds that enable more fuel efficient automobiles, fatigue evaluation procedures for such welds are not well-established. This article discusses the results of an evaluation Battelle performed of the fatigue characteristics of aluminum alloy spot welds based on experimental data and observations from the literature. In comparison with spot welds in steel alloys, aluminum alloy spot welds exhibit several significant differences including a different hardness distribution at and around the weld, different fatigue failure modes, and more. The effectiveness and applicability of the Battelle structural stress-based simplified procedure for modeling and simulating automotive spot welds has previously been demonstrated by Battelle investigations.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0573
Tau Tyan, Yu-Kan Hu, Dana Sun, Leonard Shaner, Matt Niesluchowski, Nand Kochhar, Guofei Chen, Ming Shi
Abstract Motivated by a combination of increasing consumer demand for fuel efficient vehicles, more stringent greenhouse gas, and anticipated future Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, automotive manufacturers are working to innovate in all areas of vehicle design to improve fuel efficiency. In addition to improving aerodynamics, enhancing internal combustion engines and transmission technologies, and developing alternative fuel vehicles, reducing vehicle weight by using lighter materials and/or higher strength materials has been identified as one of the strategies in future vehicle development. Weight reduction in vehicle components, subsystems and systems not only reduces the energy needed to overcome inertia forces but also triggers additional mass reduction elsewhere and enables mass reduction in full vehicle levels.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0511
Bradford Johnson, John Henshaw, Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey
Abstract Increasing fuel economy is a high priority of the automotive industry due to consumer demand and government regulations. High strength aluminum alloys such as AA7075-T6 can be used in strength-critical automotive applications to reduce vehicle weight and thus improve fuel economy. However, these aluminum alloys are known to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for thick plate. The level of susceptibility to SCC must be determined before a material is implemented. ASTM standards exist that generate semi-quantitative data primarily for use in screening materials for SCC. For the purposes of this work ASTM G139 (breaking load method) has been used to evaluate sheet AA7075-T6 for use in automotive applications. A tensile fixture applying a constant strain was used to quantitatively measure residual strength of the material after exposure to a corrosive environment.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0701
Anupam Vivek, Bert Liu, Daniel Sakkinen, Mark Harris, Glenn Daehn
Abstract Vaporizing Foil Actuators (VFA) are based on the phenomenon of rapid vaporization of thin metallic foils and wires, caused by passage of a capacitor bank driven current on the order of 100 kA. The burst of the conductor is accompanied with a high-pressure pulse, which can be used for working metal at high strain rates. This paper focuses on the use of VFA for collision welding of dissimilar metals, in particular, aluminum and steel. Aluminum alloy 6061 sheets of 1 mm thickness were launched to velocities in excess of 650 m/s with input electrical energy of 8 kJ into 0.0762 mm thick, dog-bone shaped aluminum foil actuators. Target sheets made from dual phase steel (DP780) were impacted with the aluminum flyer sheet, and solid state impact welds were created. During mechanical testing, many samples failed outside the weld area, thereby indicating that the weld was stronger than the parent aluminum.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0687
Guang Wang, Xueyuan Nie, Jimi Tjong
Abstract In order to reduce the weight of an automotive engine, an aluminum (Al) alloy engine block with cast iron liner has been successfully used to replace the gray cast iron engine. For newly emerging Al linerless engine in which the low surface hardness of the aluminum alloy has to be overcome, a few surface processing technologies are used to protect the surface of cylinders. Among them, plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) thermal spraying coating is becoming popular. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is also proposed for increasing the wear resistance of aluminum alloy and reducing the friction between the cylinder and piston. In this work, a PEO coating with a thickness of ∼20 μm was prepared, and a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to study the tribological behavior of the coating at oil lubricant conditions. Different surface roughness of the coating and a large range of the sliding speeds were employed for the tests.
2015-04-07
Magazine
GM's CTO driving new paths to technology leadership 'We're making actual production commitments regarding our advanced-technology strategy, rather than just talking about it,' says GM's CTO Jon Lauckner. 'We're absolutely going to be among the leaders, if not the leader, in these areas.' Aluminum prepares for its next big leap Ford's F-Series blockbuster was just the beginning. New micromills now in pilot phase aim to bring vastly stronger and more formable light-alloy materials at higher capacity, says Alcoa's Mike Murphy. Slick solutions for friction reduction From new lubricants to 'smart' oil pumps and clever bearing technologies, engine designers are attacking every potential source of spin losses and internal friction in the quest for more mechanical work out of less fuel. Next-gen NSX: a twin-turbo, multi-material Ferrari-fighter The production NSX made its much-awaited global debut at NAIAS in January.
2015-04-03
WIP Standard
AMS4223E
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of castings.
2015-04-03
WIP Standard
AMS4242C
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of castings.
2015-04-03
WIP Standard
AMS4229G
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sand, permanent mold, and composite mold castings.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4182H
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of wire. This wire has been used typically for the manufacture of screen for reinforcement of, and to provide electrical conductivity through, rubber gaskets, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4004E
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of foil. This foil has been used typically for corrugated or expanded honeycomb core material for use in sandwich construction, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4071N
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of drawn, round seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts, such as hydraulic systems and fuel and oil lines, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4068F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of drawn seamless tubing 0.029 to 0.500 inch (0.74 to 12.70 mm) in nominal wall thickness. This tubing has been used primarily for structures requiring good fusion weldability and a combination of good strength and resistance to stress corrosion cracking after precipitation heat treatment, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4079H
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of drawn, round, seamless tubing. This tubing has been used typically for ducts requiring small radius bends and moderate strength after solution and precipitation heat treatment, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4190K
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-metal-arc or gas-tungsten-arc welding of aluminum alloys of similar composition, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4077H
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate. This product has been used typically for structural components, including machine tapered parts, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4189J
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-metal-arc or gas-tungsten-arc welding of heavy sections of aluminum alloys of similar composition to produce joints having inherently low dilution ratio of base-metal to weld-metal, and where the weldment may require solution and/or precipitation heat treatment, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4218K
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sand, permanent mold, composite mold, and investment castings.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4191K
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of welding wire. This wire has been used typically as filler metal for gas-metal-arc or gas-tungsten-arc welding of aluminum alloys of similar composition where the joint is capable of being heat treated to a strength level comparable to that of the parent metal, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4241E
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of castings. These castings have been used typically for structural aircraft components (See 8.3) requiring DAS quality control, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4219G
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of castings.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4313E
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of rolled or forged rings.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4261G
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of investment castings. These castings have been used typically for components requiring low weight, moderate strength and soundness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-03-25
WIP Standard
AMS4871H
This specification covers an aluminum bronze alloy in the form of centrifugal and chill castings.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3170

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