Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 3151
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1356
Atishay Jain
Swingarm, originally known as the swing fork or pivoted fork is a dynamic structural part of the rear suspension of most modern motorcycles. It is used to hold the rear axle firmly, while pivoting vertically on the frame, to allow the suspension to absorb bumps in the road. Driving and braking loads are also transmitted through the swing arm, and thus, it plays a major role in vehicle dynamics. Weight minimization is important in a swingarm as it is largely an unsprung mass. The conventional swingarm design includes steel tubing and sheet metal structures. Due to higher forces near the pivot, conventional swingarm are inherently over-designed as they use tubular structures of same cross section through the entire length of the swingarm. An aluminum alloy swingarm design even when subjected to casting manufacturing constraints, has the potential for better material layout and weight minimization.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0687
Guang Wang, Xueyuan Nie, Jimi Tjong
In order to reduce the weight of an automotive engine, an aluminum alloy engine block without cast iron liner has been successfully used to replace the gray cast iron engine. However, the low surface hardness of the aluminum alloy may cause high wear and friction on the aluminum cylinders. To overcome these drawbacks, a few surface processing technologies are used to protect the surface of cylinders. Among them, plasma transferred wire arc (PTWA) thermal spraying coating is becoming popular. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating is also proposed for increasing the wear resistance of aluminum alloy and reducing the friction between the cylinder and piston. In this work, a PEO coating with a thickness of 15 um was prepared, and a high speed pin-on-disc tribometer was used to study the tribological behavior of the coating at oil lubricant conditions. Different surface roughness of the coating and a large range of the sliding speeds were employed for the tests.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0702
Bita Ghaffari, Jonathan Dekam, Kevin Haddix, Kimberly Lazarz, Sergey Titov, Roman Maev
Adhesive bonding technology has gained increased significance in automotive industry, especially with the growing use of aluminum alloy body structures. The variability in thicknesses of the metal and adhesive layers, as well as the variability in joint geometry, of automotive components has presented challenges in nondestructive evaluation of adhesive joints. These issues have recently been resolved for steel-adhesive joints through the use of an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. The difference in acoustic impedance of steel and Al, however, leads to a lack of robustness in using the same technique for Al-adhesive joints. In this paper, we present the results from utilizing a modified version of this pulse-echo algorithm to inspect Al-adhesive joints in both laboratory and production environments. A 52-element, 10 mm X 10 mm, 15-MHz matrix array of ultrasonic transducers was used to obtain the echotrains, analysis of which produced a C-scan image of the adhesive bead.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0515
Haiou Jin, Yimin Zeng, Jie Liang, M.S. Kozdras
New aluminum alloys, based on a commercial Al-Mn-Cu brazing sheet alloy with alloying element Mg up to 2 wt.%, have been developed for automotive radiators serviced at temperatures above 200°C. The new Al-Mn-Cu-Mg alloys are to be used as core material in brazing sheets for vacuum brazing and Ni plate brazing. They were DC cast to 3” lab sized ingots, homogenized at 520°C, hot rolled to 5.5 - 5.8mm, and cold rolled down to a final gauge of 1mm. It has been demonstrated by various mechanical and corrosion testing that Mg contributes a strong solid solution hardening effect at both the room and elevated temperatures, without damaging the other mechanical properties or corrosion resistance. Therefore, the new alloys have shown high yield strength above 60 MPa at 200 - 300°C service temperatures, with no reduction in formability and very limited reduction in corrosion resistance.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0511
Bradford Johnson, John Henshaw, Nia R. Harrison, S. George Luckey
Increasing fuel economy is a high priority of the automotive industry due to consumer demand and government regulations. High strength aluminum alloys such as AA7075-T6 can be used in strength-critical automotive applications to reduce vehicle weight and thus improve fuel economy. However, these aluminum alloys are known to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for thick plate. The level of susceptibility to SCC must be determined before a material is implemented. ASTM standards exist that generate semi-quantitative data primarily for use in screening materials for SCC. For the purposes of this work ASTM G139 (breaking load method) has been used to evaluate sheet AA7075-T6 for use in automotive applications. A tensile fixture applying a constant strain was used to quantitatively measure residual strength of the material after exposure to a corrosive environment.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0516
Nan Wang
Current die design recommendations attempt to limit the production of burrs through accurate alignment of the upper and lower edges. For aluminum automotive exterior panels, this translates to a gap less than 0.1 mm. However, the tolerances required by such standards often exceed the capabilities of many trim dies. Experimental results on influence of trimming conditions on the shape of the sheared surface will be combined with the results of stretching strips after trimming. The objective of the research described in this paper is to study the mechanism of fracture generation and cracks propagation during half-a-dog bone tensile test representing stretch flanging condition. One side of the sample had sheared surface obtained by the trimming process while the other side of the sample had a smooth surface. The effect of texture of the sheared edge on stretchability of Al sheet was investigated. Significant attention was paid to understanding of fracture sources.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0514
Sugrib K. Shaha, Frank Czerwinski, Wojciech Kasprzak, Jacob Friedman, Daolun Chen
Abstract The uniaxial compression test was used to assess the influence of strain amount on the behavior of precipitates and texture of the Al-7%Si-1%Cu-0.5%Mg alloy, modified with micro-additions of V, Zr and Ti. As revealed through metallographic examinations, fracturing and re-orientation of the second-phase particles increased with increasing compression strain. However, the intermetallic particles experienced substantially more frequent cracking than the eutectic silicon. The crystallographic texture was measured and correlated with deformation behavior of the alloy. The weak texture of 11<211> and 111<110> components, detected after casting transformed to a mixture of 1<110>, 112<110> and 111<110> components after room-temperature compression deformation. The intensity of the texture components depended on the strain amount. It is concluded that the texture formation in the studied alloy is controlled by the precipitates formed during solidification of the alloy.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0573
Tau Tyan, Yu-Kan Hu, Dana Sun, Leonard Shaner, Matt Niesluchowski, Nand Kochhar, Guofei Chen, Ming Shi
Motivated by a combination of increasing consumer demand for fuel efficient vehicles, more stringent greenhouse gas and 2025 Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, automotive manufacturers are working to innovate in all areas of vehicle design to optimize fuel efficiency. In addition to improved aerodynamics, enhanced powertrain technologies and alternative fuel vehicles, reducing vehicle weight by using lighter materials has been identified as one of the most important strategies in future vehicle development. Weight reduction in vehicle components, sub-systems and systems not only reduces the energy needed to overcome inertia forces but also can trigger additional mass reduction elsewhere and enable significant mass reduction in full vehicle levels.
2015-02-27
Standard
AMS4323C
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of hand forgings up to 6 inches (152 mm) inclusive, in nominal as-forged thickness and having a cross-sectional area of not more than 156 square inches (1006 cm2) (See 8.6).
2015-02-25
Standard
AMS4634C
This specification covers an aluminum bronze alloy in the form of bars, rods, forgings, and forging stock.
2015-02-06
WIP Standard
D15AA
This specification is a proposed draft of a new temper (T852) which covers aluminum-lithium alloy 2050
2015-02-05
Standard
AMS4205D
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of plate up to 5.500 inches (139.70 mm), inclusive in thickness.
2015-02-05
Standard
AMSQQA250/4B
This specification covers the specific requirements for 2024 aluminum alloy plate and sheet; the general requirements are covered in AMS-QQ-A-250.
2015-02-04
WIP Standard
AS6507
1.1 This specification is used to indicate the resistance to distortion of bare and two-side Alclad, flat sheet aluminum that will be chemically milled (often in the manufacture of aircraft skin panels). 1.2 This specification is intended for bare and two-side Alclad aluminum alloy in the T temper, which is the form of flat sheet having a thickness between 0.032 to 0.249 in. (0.8 to 6.3 mm). 1.3 Product having the capability prescribed by this specification is available in limited quantities and tempers because of the special processing required.
2015-02-03
WIP Standard
AMS2770M
This specification specifies the engineering requirements for heat treatment, by part fabricators (users) or their vendors or subcontractors, of parts (See 8.8.1). It also covers heat treatment by warehouses or distributors converting raw material from one temper to another temper (See 1.3 and 8.5). It covers the following aluminum alloys: 1100, 2004, 2014, 2017, 2024, 2098, 2117, 2124, 2219, 2224, 3003, 5052, 6013, 6061, 6063, 6066, 6951, 7049, 7050, 7075, 7149, 7178, 7249, 7475
2015-01-15
Standard
AMS4090F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of plate. This plate has been used typically for structural applications requiring plate with high strength, moderate fatigue strength, and high fracture-toughness, but usage is not limited to such applications.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7912D
This specification covers an aluminum-beryllium alloy in the form of bars, rods, tubing, and shapes consolidated from powder by extrusion.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0035
Krishnan Sadagopan, Somasundaram Suresh Kumar, Arulsivan T, Senthilnathan Karunakaran
Abstract The cylinder head of a diesel engine is a multi-functional entity, decidingthe performance and emission parameters of the engine. It also acts as a structural and sealing member. It accommodates ports for gas exchange process; injectors for combustion process, cooling passages optimized for heat transfer, valve train mechanism, and lubrication circuits and in addition in our case integrated common rail fuel injection pump drive and systems. Aluminum is light weight with benefits. Combustion is direct injection subject to higher thermal and mechanical loads, it must be robust enough to withstand the high operating temperature and peak firing pressure. The design and development of effective Intake and Exhaust Ports remains critical to improve volumetric efficiency. Compactness not only helps in packaging by having optimum LBH but also in making it light.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0066
Aravind Vadiraj, Shashank Tiwari, Ashutosh Dasare
Abstract Mechanical and wear properties of Al alloyed gray cast iron (0.5% and 1.0%) were compared with that of Mo (1.0%) and Cu (0.77%) alloyed gray cast iron in this investigation. All the alloys showed pearlitic microstructure. The graphite morphology varied due to varying chemistry. The fracture surface showed “cabbage” like dimpled morphology indicating the predominant ductile fracture. It was found that the Mo containing cast iron show 25 to 30% higher strength and 6 to 7 times better wear resistance compared to Al containing cast irons. The worn surface showed oxide formation during sliding.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0169
Simhachalam Bade, Lakshmanarao C
Abstract There is a growing need for improved conceptual vehicle designs along with alternative materials to reduce the damage to the passengers and structures in aerospace and automotive industries. The energy absorption characteristics of materials play a major role in designing a safe vehicle for transport. In this paper, compression behavior and energy absorption of aluminum alloy AA6061 and AA7005 tubes in T4 and T6 conditions are investigated by experimental and numerical methods. The AA7005 and AA6061 tubes are solution heat treated and then aged to achieve the final strength in T6 condition. Experimental compression test results have shown improved energy absorption of tubes in T6 condition compared to tubes in T4 condition. There is less variation of energy among the tested samples. The mean load is compared with the results obtained from analytical formulae. Tensile properties have been obtained from tensile tests using UTM for both AA6061 and AA7005 tubes.
2015-01-14
Standard
AMS7913D
This specification covers an aluminum-beryllium alloy in the form of sheet and plate consolidated from powder by extrusion and then rolled.
2015-01-07
Standard
AMS7911D
This specification covers aluminum-beryllium powders consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) into the form of bar, rod, tubing, and shapes.
2015-01-05
Standard
AMS4159E
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, profiles, and tubing with a nominal diameter or least thickness (wall thickness of tubing) up to 5.000 inches, inclusive.
2015-01-05
Standard
AMS4154R
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, profiles, and tubing.
2015-01-05
Standard
AMS4479
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded profiles with a maximum cross-sectional area of 25 in2 (160.29 cm 2 ) and nominal thicknesses from 0.250 to 2.500 inch, inclusive (6.3 to 63.50 mm, inclusive).
2015-01-05
Standard
AMS4480
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of seamless, drawn tubing.
2015-01-05
Standard
AMS4153L
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded bars, rods, wire, profiles, and tubing up to 32 square inches (206 square cm) in area.
2015-01-05
Standard
AMS4535D
This specification covers a copper beryllium alloy in the form of mechanical tubing. This tubing has been used typically for parts requiring a combination of high strength, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance and where thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity, and low magnetic susceptibility may be important, but usage is not limited to such applications. While the materials, methods, applications, and processes described or referenced in this specification may involve the use of hazardous materials, this specification does not address the hazards which may be involved in such use. It is the sole responsibility of the user to ensure familiarity with the safe and proper use of any hazardous materials and to take necessary precautionary measures to ensure the health and safety of all personnel involved.
2014-12-29
Standard
AMS4037Q
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate from 0.008 to 4.000 inches (0.20 to 101.60 mm) in thickness, inclusive (See 8.4).
2014-12-23
Standard
AMS4028H
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate from 0.020 to 1.000 inches (0.51 to 25.4 mm) thick (See 8.3).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3151

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: