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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3215
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1351
Simhachalam Bade
Aluminum alloys are widely used in the transportation because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and outstanding capability in absorbing energy. In this paper, performance of bumper with crash tubes using aluminum alloy AA6061 and AA7003 materials is compared using numerical methods. Quasi-static test is simulated using the LS-DYNA implicit finite element program. Bumper and crash tubes are included in the finite element model. Symmetric Holes are provided in the crash tubes to initiate crushing. True stress-plastic strain curves from the tensile test are used in the static simulation. Displacement is applied to the bumper using Rigdwall geometric wall motion. The energy absorbed by bumper and crash tubes are compared. Dynamic simulation is done using LS-Dyna explicit program. True stress-true plastic strain curves at different strain rates from the literature is used in the dynamic simulation of AA7003 material to study the strain rate effects on impact behavior of tubes.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1575
Federico Ballo, ROBERTO FRIZZI, Gianpiero Mastinu, Donato Mastroberti, Giorgio Previati, Claudio Sorlini
Lightweight design and construction is (and has always been) a central task in vehicles design. Minimizing the overall mass of a vehicle means minimizing the mass of each single component. Together with mass minimization, acceptable structural performance and durability requirements have to be maintained, particularly for wheels. In this paper the lightweight design and construction of road vehicle aluminum wheels is dealt with. Dedicated experimental tests aimed at assessing the fatigue life behavior of the aluminum alloy A356 – T6 have been performed, namely, cylindrical specimens have been extracted from three different locations in the wheel. Fully reversed strain-controlled and load-controlled fatigue tests have been performed and the stress/strain-life curves on the three areas of the wheel have been computed and compared. The constant amplitude rotary bending fatigue test of the wheel has been simulated by means of Finite Element method.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0386
HongTae Kang, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Xuming Su, Mingchao Guo, Yung-Li Lee, Shyam Pittala, Chonghua Jiang, Brian Jordon
Friction stir linear welding (FSLW) is widely used in joining lightweight materials including aluminum alloys and magnesium alloys. However, fatigue life prediction method for FSLW is not well developed yet. This paper is tried to predict fatigue life of FSLW using two different methods. Structural stress method is the first one and maximum principal stress based method is the second. FSLW is represented with 2D shell elements for the structural stress approach but is represented with TIE contact for the maximum principal stress based method in finite element (FE) models. S-N curves were developed from coupon specimen test results and two stress approaches. These S-N curves were first used to predict fatigue life of FSLW of simple double lap-shear specimens. Then, the same S-N curves were used to predict fatigue life of the front shock tower structures that were constructed by joining AM60 to AZ31 and AM60 to AM30 using FSLW.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0371
Wenkai Li, Carlos Engler-Pinto, Haitao CUI, Weidong Wen, Xuming Su
In this paper, fatigue tests on a cast aluminum alloy (AS7GU-T64) were performed under different frequencies and humidity levels. Tests conducted under conventional frequency in laboratory air have been compared to tests conducted under ultrasonic frequency in dry air, saturated humidity and in distilled water. It was observed that the highest and lowest fatigue lives corresponded to ultrasonic fatigue tests in dry air and in distilled water, respectively. Unlike specimens tested at conventional frequency, all of the specimens tested under ultrasonic frequency presented a large amount of slip facets on the crack propagation fracture surface.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0353
Suleman Ahmad, Dimitry Sediako, Anthony Lombardi, C. (Ravi) Ravindran, Robert Mackay, Ahmed Nabawy
For many years, aluminum alloys have been replacing ferrous alloys in automotive applications to reduce the weight of vehicles. One significant area is engine blocks, which are commonly made of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys containing additions of Cu and Mg. These engine blocks typically contain cast-iron liners to improve wear resistance, however, they introduce residual stress due to thermo-mechanical mismatch. This stress has its highest magnitude in the cylinder bridge area and may lead to cylinder distortion or cracking. Several heat treatment processes are being used in industry to mitigate residual stress. One of these, artificial aging, has been found to be effective in reducing residual stress. In this study, neutron diffraction was used to measure the residual stress profiles along the cylinder bores of 319 Al engine blocks, treated to a T5 condition (aging from as-cast condition).
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0426
Francisco C. Cione, Armando Souza, Luiz Martinez, Jesualdo Rossi, Evandro Giuseppe Betini, Fabio Rola, Marco A. Colosio
Studying the formation and distribution of residual stress fields will improve the operational criteria of wheel safety, among other gains. Many engineering specifications, manufacturing procedures, inspection and quality control have begun to require that the residual stress of a particular component be evaluated. It is known that these residual stress fields could be added to the effects of system load (tare weight plus occupation of vehicle traction, braking and torque combined). The results obtained used X-ray diffraction, drilling method with rosette type strain gages, are convergent with similarity to those obtained using FEA simulation over critical region for global and superficial in principal stresses mode. The mathematical tools for modeling and simulations using finite elements had evolved following the increasing computing power and hardware cost reduction.
2016-02-02
Standard
AMS4458A
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of plate 0.500 to 2.000 inch, incl (12.70 to 50.80 mm, incl) in thickness (see 8.5).
2016-02-02
Standard
AMS4100F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of alclad sheet 0.040 inch to 0.249 inch (1.02 to 6.32 mm), incl in nominal thickness (see 8.4).
2016-02-02
Standard
AMS4056H
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate 0.051 to 8.000 inches (1.30 to 203.20 mm), incl, in thickness (see 8.4).
2016-01-12
Standard
AMS4364
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of plate from 1.000 to 6.000 inches (25.40 to 152.40mm) in thickness (See 8.4).
2016-01-12
Standard
AMS4354
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of plate from 1.000 to 6.000 inches (25.40 to 152.40 mm) in thickness (see 8.4).
2016-01-02
Standard
AS1990D
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) is to provide a description of the temper nomenclature system for aluminum alloys used in the aerospace industry by combining information from different sources for the benefit of the user.
2015-12-20
Standard
AMS4069F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of drawn, round seamless tubing 0.010 to 0.450 inch (0.25 to 11.43 mm), inclusive, in wall thickness (see 8.4).
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
D15AE
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of rolled, drawn, or cold finished bar, rod, wire and special shaped.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
D15AF
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of rolled, drawn or cold finished bar, rod, wire, and special shapes.
2015-12-10
WIP Standard
AMS4121J
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of bars, rods, and wire.
2015-12-04
Standard
AMS4272
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate, clad on both sides, from 0.063 to 0.600 inch inclusive (1.60 to 15.24 mm, inclusive), in nominal thickness (see 8.5).
2015-12-03
Standard
AMS4004E
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of foil.
2015-12-02
WIP Standard
GAD15AB
This is a general agreement ballot to rescind existing general agreements to use AS1990 for temper designations, and replace it with reference to ANSI H35.1.
2015-12-02
Standard
AMS4355
This specification covers discontinuously reinforced aluminum alloy (DRA) metal matrix composites (MMC) made by mechanical alloying of the 2124A powder and SiC particulate, which is then consolidated by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) into shapes less than 62 in2 (0.04 m2) cross-section (see 8.11).
2015-12-02
Standard
AMS4070N
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of drawn, round seamless tubing with wall thicknesses of 0.010 to 0.450 inch (0.25 to 11.43 mm), inclusive.
2015-12-02
Standard
AMS4190K
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of welding wire.
2015-11-18
WIP Standard
AMS4356
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of seamless drawn round tubing, having a wall thickness of 0.045 to 0.125 inches (1.14 to 3.18 mm) (see 8.4).
2015-11-17
Technical Paper
2015-32-0805
Masami Okubo, Masato Suzuki
The connecting rods employed in most of general-purpose engines with a power from 1.5 kW to 10 kW are manufactured from aluminum alloy in order to increase productivity and reduce weight, and therefore display lower material strength than steel connecting rods. In terms of operating conditions, general-purpose engines are frequently operated under high load while being held at a comparatively low engine speed, necessitating strength and durability in relation to combustion pressure. Realizing a balance between the rigidity of each part is an important factor in reconciling the achievement of weight reduction in the reciprocating parts while also keeping strength. The research discussed in this paper developed a structure optimization system to examine shape parameters for reciprocating parts targeting 4 kW class engines, and studied shapes that would balance the reduction of weight with the keeping of strength.
2015-11-11
Event
2015-10-15
Standard
AMS4023F
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of sheet and plate.
2015-10-14
WIP Standard
AMS4394A
This specification covers a magnesium alloy in the form of welding wire.
2015-10-07
WIP Standard
GAD15AA
This general agreement provides standard wording for marking for use when exceptions are taken to technical requirements in a commodity material specification.
2015-09-23
WIP Standard
AMS4126D
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of die forgings, hand forgings, rolled rings, and stock for forging or rolled rings.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3215

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