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Viewing 1 to 30 of 5597
2015-04-21
Event
These sessions are seeking abstracts that specifically address the development of polymeric and composite materials for automotive interiors and exteriors, powertrain components, as well as structural and non-structural applications. Focus is on design, processes, bonding and manufacturing technologies, as well as lightweighting strategies. Abstracts on the analysis of functional performance of these materials are encouraged.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0714
Jeffrey L. Klipstein
Today the automotive market is pursuing lighter weight materials to reduce the overall weight of the vehicle. This is mainly due to the ever increasing demand to improve gas mileage. Past advances have shown that a lower density Sheet Molding Compound (SMC) based on fiberglass and polyester technology, can be manufactured with sufficient mechanical properties and weight reduction; but this has been limited to structural or non-Class A applications. However, recent advancements have shown that a Class A surface with acceptable mechanical properties can be achieved in a 1.2 specific gravity, low density SMC system, based on fiberglass and unsaturated polyester technology. This paper will compare past advancements in lower density systems, along with an insight into future work that is currently in progress.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0719
Kumar Vivek, Arnab Sandilya, Sameer srivastava
(For automotive usage, non-woven fabrics are used in Floor Carpets and as face fabrics of Headliners. The performance (abrasion, Tear resistance, stiffness etc.), of these fabrics are routinely checked only when freshly made. However, since these fabrics are exposed to sunlight and weather and customer usage, some extent of degradation takes place and performance degrades over time. The objective of this paper is to study the effect of ageing on the performance of non-woven fabric used in automobile carpets and headliners
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0717
Anindya Deb, G S Venkatesh, Ashok Mache
The usage of lightweight materials such as plastics and their derivatives continues to increase in automobiles driven by the urgency for weight reduction. For structural performance, body components such as A-pillar or B-pillar trim, instrument panel, etc. have to meet various requirements including resistance to penetration and energy absorption capability under impact indentation. A range of plain and reinforced thermoplastics and thermosetting plastics has been considered in the present study in the form of plates which are subject to low velocity perforation in a drop-weight impact testing set-up with a rigid cylindrical indenter fitted to a tup. The tested plates are made of polypropylene (PP), nanoclay-reinforced PP of various percentages of nanoclay content, wood-PP composites of different volume fractions of wood fiber, a jute-polyester composite, and a hybrid jute-polyester reinforced with steel.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0893
Michael D. Kass, Chris Janke, Raynella Connatser, Sam Lewis, James keiser, Timothy Theiss
Plastic materials are used ubiquitously in fuel infrastructure systems. A matrix of plastic specimens including thermoplastics and thermosetting resins were exposed to No. 2 diesel fuel and a blend containing 20% bio-oil. Material types included permeation barriers, (PET, PPS, PVDF, and PTFE), Nylon, acetals, polyethylene and several types of fiberglass resin, Four specimens were evaluated for each material type (three immersed in the test fuel liquid and one placed exposed to the vapor phase only). The exposure time for each material was 16 weeks at 60oC For each specimen exposed to the liquid fuel, the mass and volume change and hardness were measured for both wetted and dried conditions. The specimens exposed to the vapor phase were measured for hardness only. Dynamic mechanical analysis was also performed for each material to determine the onset of the glass to rubber transition temperature.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0716
Abhishake Goyal, Nadeem Yamin
Titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide are inorganic materials which have been extensively investigated because of their unique electronic and optical properties. The poly(vinylalcohol)(PVA)/ Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) based films are used for electrical applications. The poor mechanical properties and low glass transition temperature of PVA based packaging films can potentially be enhanced by the use of PVP with it. Incorporation of nano-particles leads to produce nano-composites. Thin polymer films are attractive for its variety of applications in packaging; coating materials etc. PVA is used for its water solubility and good biodegradability property.PVP is used as it provides strength to the film and improve the film properties. In-situ method is one of the most economic methods but the easiest way to disperse nano-particles is through sol gel technique. In the present work, Ti-SiO2 doped nanoparticles were prepared in four concentrations 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0718
G Karthik, K V Balaji, Bathiry Sivaraman, Deshpande Samar
This paper describes about Vinyl ester based SMC (Sheet molding composite) material for Oil Sump part in automotive application. This Sheet moulding composite is a ready to mould glass-fibre reinforced vinyl ester material primarily used in compression moulding process. This vinyl ester resin is compounded with glass fibre to meet the product functional requirements. This Oil sump part is the structural under bonnet component which main purpose is to form the bottommost part of the crankcase and to contain the engine oil before and after it has been circulated through the engine. Generally, metal are most preferable material for this application. Here, Fibre filled Vinyl ester based thermoset resin (SMC) material has been explored which has excellent characteristics in terms of Tensile strength, Modulus, Impact strength, Dimensional stability, Chemical Resistance & High/Low temperature resistance which is suitable for Oil sump application.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0711
Kate Johnson
The ever-changing landscape of automotive electronics is constantly increasing in demand for material performance. As the features and components become more intricate and complex and the packages shrink in size and volume, the design community begins to push the boundaries of their current toolbox. The automotive electronics design playground is limited by material sets that often need higher temperatures and longer time to achieve the structural adhesion that these critical applications often require. Additionally, there can often be material sensitivities or component incompatibilities that make achieving the required level of adhesion impossible without exasperating design modifications. There have been very few significant advances in the past several decades to support the great expansion in the material set and complexities of the components. Many substrates have remained incredibly challenging to bond with required strength and structural integrity.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0709
Xiaoqing Xu, Bohan Liu, Yibing Li
Polyvinyl butyral (PVB) film and SentryGlas® Plus (SGP) film have been widely used in automotive windshield and architectures curtain serving as protective interlayer materials. Viscoelasticity is the unique property of such film materials, which can contribute to improving impact resistance and energy absorbing characteristics of laminated glass. In this study, the quasi-static and dynamic tests are conducted to investigate the viscoelasticity of PVB and SGP films used in laminated glass from the aspects of creep, stress relaxation and dynamic mechanical thermal. Firstly, creep and stress relaxation tests of PVB film (0.76mm) and SGP film with three thickness (0.89mm, 1.14mm and 1.52mm) are conducted using Instron universal testing machine to obtain creep and stress relaxation curves. Creep rate equation is fitted and stress relaxation model is built.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0713
Helena Simmonds, Sophie Cox, Geraint Williams, Steve Nicholls
EU corporate average fleet CO2 emission targets of 95gkm-1 by 2020 mean that many automotive vehicles must become lighter in weight and some will be electrified. To address this challenge polymer composite materials are being explored for a number of vehicle applications. However, in some cases, operational requirements demand that these materials function above their glass transition temperature or heat deflection point. Intumescent coatings have traditionally been used in the construction industry to maintain the integrity of steelwork during a fire; this paper presents a novel experimental investigation of two intumescent technologies to thermally protect a glass fibre reinforced polymer composite, intended for use as a semi-structural vehicle component. The performance of selected coatings was assessed against critical thermal performance requirements using a heat gun to generate 500°C for 10 minutes.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0710
Daniel Frazier, Kelly Williams, Javed Mapkar
Global vehicle emissions reduction initiatives have warranted the development and usage of new materials and processes not traditionally used in the automotive industry besides exclusive applications. To support this mandate, vehicle lightweighting via metal replacement and design optimization has come into sharp focus as a doubly rewarding effect; namely, a lighter vehicle system not only requires less road load power for motivation, but also allows for smaller, usually more efficient powertrain options, which tend to be more efficient still. The automotive industry has begun to embrace adapting composite materials that have typically been available only to the upper end of the market and specialty racing applications. The specific component detailed in this paper highlights the challenges and rewards for metal replacement with an injection molded, fiber reinforced plastic for usage in mass produced drivetrain systems, namely the Electronic Limited Slip Differential (eLSD).
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1340
Yoichi Toyooka, Kiyoshi Hasegawa
Warping the exteriors of outer panels happens during the application of heat for hardening structural adhesives. Using aluminum and resin promote warping. Simulation of warping at the design stage and evaluating warping during mass-production require us to quantify the degree of warping to evaluate absolute values. These analytic values correspond to values from warping in panels, and display a correlation with visual examinations. Degree of displacement was an evaluative indicator for the quantification of warping. However, warping will not always be recognized due to gradual change in areas of the panel and cases where it will be recognized due to sudden change, despite that the absolute value of the degree of displacement might be the same. This research considered a warping simulation and evaluation using curvature as the evaluative indicator. Curvature is the gradient of change of the curved surface.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1341
Hisaki Sugaya, Yoshiyuki Tosa, Kazuo Imura, Hiroyuki Mae
When airbags deploy they break a plastic tear part of the instrument panel. Timing and the tear fracture process change the airbag’s deployment behavior. The tear fracture process is dependent on the plastic’s temperature. We developed a tear fracture simulation . Because the tear line is composed of 1mm width and 0.5mm-3.0mm flute thickness, simulating the tear fracture process is difficult, even using two models: airbag deployment, and plastic fracture. Thickness determines the tear fracture. The strain distribution of its parts should be predicted accurately. The tear fracture using solid mesh, which is 0.1mm mesh pitch, is predictable. Although it is a very complicated model and has a high computation cost, it is not applicable to the mass production development. We increase the accuracy of the tear fracture process prediction using the shell mesh, which is applicable to the mass production development.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1304
G Karthik, K V Balaji, Rao Venkateshwara, Bagul Rahul
This paper describes about recycled polyethylene terephthalate(R-PET) material for canopy strip part in automotive application. This recycled PET is a compounded material which is made out of used PET bottles and it is compounded with glass fibre to meet the product functional requirements. Canopy strip is a structural exterior part which requires better mechanical and thermal properties. The major function of this part is to act like a structural frame to hold the canopy sheet which is present at the both sides of the vehicle. Generally, PET bottles are use and throw product. PET is inert and takes an extremely long time to degrade so the empty bottles would also take an enormous amount of space in landfills which will directly affect rain water percolation. This compounded material is one of the sustainable solution for the environment where the waste bottles get converted to useful automotive parts.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0712
Marzieh Hajiaghamemar, Morteza Seidi, Vincent Caccese
This paper presents a study of the stress–strain behavior of honeycomb structure with the purpose to mitigate impact forces. Honeycomb structures are used in various applications as a shock absorber. Using a highly elastic material can enhance the energy absorption capacity of the honeycomb structure through elastic buckling when impacted normal to the surface. The polyurethanes offer both exceptional impact resistance and elastic memory that make them great for impact protection gear. In this study, five different Shore A durometer polyurethane honeycomb layers were manufactured and the stress–strain behavior of polyurethane honeycombs at different strain-rates were investigated. The low strain-rate tests were conducted using a MTS® machine at strain rates of 0.01s-1, 0.1s-1 and 1s-1 and the load and displacement of the samples were measured.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1122
Kengo Yabe, Toru Inagaki, Takashi Kondo
Seat vibration when the vehicle is idling and when it is in motion has been reduced by using a floating seat that controls the resonance frequencies. The resonance frequency is controlled by replacing the structures of the seat-mounting unit with floating structures using rubber bushings. Partly replacing the mounting unit with floating structures makes it possible to control the resonance frequencies of the entire seat. The issue of balancing vibration reduction with strength and durability and crash safety performance due to fitting rubber bushings to the seat-mounting unit was addressed using stopper structures optimized for each type of input. To adopt a floating seat into an actual vehicle, the floating structure and conventional foot bracket are combined. This combined foot bracket not only makes it easy to assemble floating structure into the seat, but also makes it possible to keep the seat weight almost the same as a conventional seat.
2015-03-09 ...
  • March 9-10, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Today's necessity for quickly delivering products to market limits product development time and leaves less room for error and 're-dos.' With so many plastic materials available, it is crucial that those involved in product design understand resin properties and how they affect part design and manufacturability. To help you make the best plastic choices the first time, this seminar provides an overview of polymer chemistry, explains the methods for testing properties of plastics and presents a method of systematic selection that will optimize your plastics material selection process.
2015-01-15
Standard
J1647_201501
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements to evaluate the suitability of plastic optical materials for possible use in discharge forward lighting (DFL) devices in motor vehicles. These materials are typically used for lenses and reflectors. Separate testing is required for each combination of material, industrial coating, DFL light source, and device focal length. The tests are intended to determine physical and optical characteristics of the materials and coatings. Performance expectations of finished assemblies, including plastic components, are to be based on tests for lighting devices, as specified in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices for motor vehicle lighting equipment. Optical components exposed to weathering should also be subject to SAE J576.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0242
Rolf Bücker
Abstract Future doors require light weight, cost efficient and acoustic optimized solutions. Current steel doors offer only a small range of possibilities in these areas. With the use of aluminum doors the weight will be reduced but production complexity and costs will be increased. A modular door approach supports all of these future demands. Door modules have set milestones for door concepts in the past. Due to technological progress, door modules are more relevant in the current scenario. The use of reinforced plastics allows a high degree of design freedom with high integration of features.[2] In addition to weight reduction of up to 1.5kg per door the complete production process comes leaner with a higher grade of quality. The acoustic performance of a door system can be adjusted for noise reduction and improvement of the sound quality of speakers as illustrated. Functional integration is the key driver of weight and cost reduction
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0170
Chaitanya Pendurthi, Sourabh Tiwari, Sujit Chalipat, Ganesh Bhagwant Gadekar
Abstract Tire plays an important role in frontal impacts as it acts as a load path to transfer loads from barrier to side sill or rocker panels of passenger vehicles. In order to achieve better correlation and more reliable predictions of vehicle crash performance in CAE simulations, modeling techniques are continuously getting refined with detailed representation of vehicle components in full vehicle crash simulations. In this study, detailed tire modeling process is explored to represent tire dynamic stiffness more accurately in frontal impact crash simulations. Detailed representation of tire internal components such as steel belts, body plies, steel beads along with rubber tread and sidewall portion have been done. Passenger car tubeless radial tire was chosen for this study. Initially, quasi-static tensile coupon tests were carried out in both longitudinal and lateral direction of tread portion of tire.
2015-01-08
Standard
AMS2491F
This specification covers the engineering requirements for preparing surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for bonding and the properties resulting from the treatment. This process has been used typically for rendering surfaces of parts capable of supporting a high strength adhesive bond. The bonding preparation can affect the electrical properties of the PTFE and this should be considered before using it for treatment of electronic components.
2014-12-17
Standard
AMS3277H
This specification covers polythioether rubber fuel resistant sealing compounds supplied as a two-component system which cures at room temperature.
2014-12-12
Standard
AS83248/2
Scope is unavailable.
2014-12-12
Standard
AS83248/1
Scope is unavailable.
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