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Viewing 1 to 30 of 5520
Technical Paper
2014-09-15
Kai Chen
The synthetic paraffinic kerosine (SPK) produced via HEFAs is of great interest for civil aviation industry as it exhibits an excellent thermal oxidative stability with significantly lower particulate matter emission. However, due to its aromatic free characteristics, the widespread use of SPK is limited by its compatibility with non-metal materials such as fuel tank elastomers. In this research the compatibility of SPK and its blends with widely used aircraft fuel tank elastomers were systematically studied. Experimental results demonstrated the volume swellability of all selected materials showed a linear relationship with volume percentage of No.3 jet fuel in SPK blend. The increase of volume percentage of No.3 jet fuel in the SPK blend increased volume swellability for all materials except fluorosilicone gasket. The alkyl benzenes and naphthalenes in the blend acted as the hydrogen donors, which facilitated the formation of polymer matrix and led to the increase of the distance between polymer chains.
Event
2014-05-06
Standard
2014-04-11
This Material Specification defines the requirements of carbon fiber fabric and epoxy resin systems used for wet lay-up repair of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy structures, qualified according to AMS 2980/1 and 2980/2.
Event
2014-04-10
This session will cover a very broad range of applications, processes and technologies as the title suggests.
Video
2014-04-10
Bob Akins, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, DSM Engineering Plastics Americas, talks with Automotive Engineering on the show floor of the SAE 2014 World Congress, touching on the latest developments in engineered plastics and the continued push toward lighter, cheaper, greener.
Standard
2014-04-09
AMS 2980/2 gives specific information about the qualification program for carbon fiber fabric, epoxy systems and the material combination used for wet lay-up repair of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy structures.
Standard
2014-04-08
AMS 2980/1 gives information about the technical requirements and qualification procedure for carbon fiber fabric and epoxy resin systems used for wet lay-up repair of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy structures.
Standard
2014-04-08
The PS specifies the batch release and delivery requirements for carbon fiber and carbon fabric used for wet lay-up repair purposes.
Event
2014-04-08
Sustainable innovation is a key need for meeting automotive design trends. Silicone science is stepping up to the challenge with optimized solutions for cost-effective reliability. CVJ boots can benefit from a new silicone rubber that combines excellent heat resistance with high levels of flex-fatigue life. Liquid silicone rubber and new options in fluoro liquid silicone rubber can boost process efficiency. Next-generation fluorosilicone rubber and high-consistency silicone rubber can be co-extruded for more durable turbocharger hoses; a special interlayer adhesion technology increases peel strength. Silicone science focuses on innovation.
Standard
2014-04-03
This PS specifies the batch release and delivery requirements for epoxy resin systems (base resin and curing agent) used for wet lay-up repair purposes. This specification relates to qualified epoxy resin systems listed in the associated QPL.
WIP Standard
2014-04-02
This SAE Standard covers nonreinforced, extruded, flexible tubing intended primarily for use as fluid lines for automotive windshield washer systems which conform to the requirements of SAE J942.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Alessandro Libriani
Abstract Synthetic rubber is used in automobiles for various applications. Tires, seals, gaskets, engine mounts, wiring cables and under the hood hoses are just a few examples. Synthetic rubber is a man-made material that uses several components as polymers, resins, carbon black, fillers, vulcanizing agents, reinforcement agents. It is a material that heavily depends on oil for its constituency, therefore it has a large carbon footprint. This study proposes the use of natural filler for automotive seals using synthetic rubber in order to reduce the impact on the environment. Calcium carbonate is the most preponderant choice as material filler because it is abundant in nature and is mined extensively. Calcium carbonate is also present in several structures in nature. Oyster shells have a great amount of it as well as egg shells. Egg shells also constitute an environmental bio-hazard when discarded in a landfill due to the organic inner membrane. The use of discarded egg shells is limited to few applications, mainly pharmaceutical.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Praveensingh Jadhav, Aditya Nanda, Manas Tripathi, Amit Kumar, Shriganesh Umbarkar
Abstract Global automobile market is very sensitive to vehicle fuel economy. Gross vehicle weight has substantial effects on FE. Hence, for designers it becomes utmost important to work on the weight reduction ideas up to single component level. Fuel delivery pipe (Fuel Rail) is one such component where there is a big potential. Fuel rail is an integral part of the vehicle fuel system and is mounted on the engine. Primarily it serves as a channel of fuel supply from fuel tank through fuel lines to the multiple fuel injectors, which further sprays the fuel into intake ports at high pressure. Due to opening and closing of injectors, pulsations are generated in fuel lines, so fuel rail also acts as a surge tank as well as a pulsation damper. All these factors make the design of a fuel rail very critical and unique for a particular engine. Materials like aluminum, plastic and sheet metal are generally used for fuel rail manufacturing. In this technical paper, design considerations for plastic fuel rail are explained.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ashok Mache, Anindya Deb, G.S. Venkatesh
Abstract Natural fiber-based composites such as jute-polyester composites have the potential to be more cost-effective and environment-friendly substitutes for glass fiber-reinforced composites which are commonly found in many applications. In an earlier study (Mache and Deb [1]), jute-polyester composite tubes of circular and square cross-sections were shown to perform competitively under axial impact loading conditions when compared to similar components made of bidirectional E-glass fiber mats and thermo-setting polyester resin. For jute-reinforced plastic panels to be feasible solutions for automotive interior trim panels, laminates made of such materials should have adequate perforation resistance. In the current study, a systematic characterization of jute-polyester and glass-polyester composite laminates made by compression molding is at first carried out under quasi-static tensile, compressive and flexural loading conditions. Low velocity impact perforation tests at speeds of around 4 m/s are then performed in an instrumented drop-weight testing device on square plates extracted from the same laminates.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ali Fatemi, Steve Mellot, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Charles Buehler
Abstract An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate tensile and fatigue behaviors of two thermoplastics, a neat impact polypropylene and a mineral and elastomer reinforced polyolefin. Tensile tests were performed at various strain rates at room, −40°C, and 85°C temperatures with specimens cut parallel and perpendicular to the mold flow direction. Tensile properties were determined from these tests and mathematical relations were developed to represent tensile properties as a function of strain rate and temperature. For fatigue behavior, the effects considered include mold flow direction, mean stress, and temperature. Tension-compression as well as tension-tension load-controlled fatigue tests were performed at room temperature, −40°C and 85°C. The effect of mean stress was modeled using the Walker mean stress model and a simple model with a mean stress sensitivity factor.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Shuming Chen, Yawei Huang, Dengfeng Wang, Dengzhi Peng, Xuewei Song
This paper proposes a new method of predicting the sound absorption performance of polymer wool using artificial neural networks (ANN) model. Some important parameters of the proposed model have been adjusted to best fit the non-linear relationship between the input data and output data. What's more, the commonly used multiple non-linear regression model is built to compare with ANN model in this study. Measurements of the sound absorption coefficient of polymer wool based on transfer function method are also performed to determine the sound absorption performance according to GB/T18696. 2-2002 and ISO10534- 2: 1998 (E) standards. It is founded that predictions of the new model are in good agreement with the experiment results.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Anshuman Shrivastava, Mark Scheel, Julie Strama
Abstract A majority of the plastics manufacturing operations are dependent on the formability of the molten thermoplastics. Ability of the material to flow at a set temperature influences the formability and the overall polymer melt process. Lubricating additive technologies are being developed to engineer the melt flow performance of the resin, promoting the compounding and molding process such as to reduce torque on the motor, reduced shear degradations, enhance uniform filling of hard-to-fill section, promoting thin wall molding, and influence the overall cycle time. Various lubricants are used in formulations to supplement superior flow and metal release with minimal effect on mechanical properties. This paper discusses the methodology to characterize the effectiveness of melt flow additives through comparing two different processing aids in Polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) polyester filled and unfilled matrix and imply differences in processing. The learning from findings in this paper can be adapted to other resin systems as applicable.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Robert A. Smith
Abstract Twenty plies of low density polyethylene (LDPE) were stacked and irradiated with 200 kGy of 5 MeV electron beam. The plies were analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) for crosslink density using melting point depression and equilibrium storage modulus respectively. Infra-red spectroscopic analysis was conducted to examine the samples for the presence of chemical modification. The thermal stability of the irradiated samples and an unexposed control was investigated using Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA). Results were utilized in assessing the viability of crosslinking products after the molding process to produce articles with improved resistance to temperature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sunit Kumar Chanana, Arpit Kapila, Sanjay Haldar, Naman Joshi, Dinesh N Dave
Abstract Plastics nowadays are playing a vital role in the ongoing innovation that is driving the automotive industry to higher performance, safety and sustainability levels. Plastics have allowed automotive designers to meet stringent carbon emission targets and fulfill consumer demands for highly fuel efficient vehicles by reducing vehicle weight while also reducing cost. The next step in weight reduction is to decrease the plastic part thickness further to the minimum possible. But with such reduction in part thickness, it becomes very difficult to meet the side impact crash regulations, and thus it becomes imperative to increase the Impact properties of such light weight materials. Keeping in line with the above, this paper describes the development of a new blend of Polypropylene which has high impact characteristics to meet crash compliance, high MFR to reduce cycle time and allow for easy filling of low thickness parts and keeping specific gravity in check to reduce weight. This is achieved through usage of high rubber content in Base PP itself in addition to conventional usage of rubber during compounding stage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Daisuke Taniguchi, Wataru Tokuhara, Yuichi Miyake
Abstract The enhancement of material durability is a key development theme for automakers since customers own cars longer. Research is being carried out to extend the lifetime of current thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) materials by enhancing hydrolysis resistance while maintaining excellent low-temperature properties and scratch resistance. This development of enhanced hydrolysis resistance without degrading the melting properties of the material was achieved by introducing a new resin structure that is resistant to the invasion of water, acid, alkalis, and other substances causing hydrolysis.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Josh Mcilvaine, Malika Warner
Abstract Thermoplastic polyesters are widely used in the automotive industry and are the material of choice for many types of electrical and electronic components due to their excellent balance of mechanical and electrical properties. Under certain conditions including elevated temperatures and the presence of high humidity, thermoplastic polyesters such as polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) have the potential to suffer hydrolytic attack. Recognizing the need for standardization, USCAR USCAR (The United States Council for Automotive Research) established component level testing guidelines specific to connectors. In response, many companies developed HR (hydrolysis resistant) PBT resins to help manufactures meet these requirements. As with many additive technologies in plastics, there are trade-offs. In this case, hydrolysis resistance was often improved at the expense of melt viscosity stability and high flow during the injection molding process. In addition to improved hydrolysis resistance, there is an emerging need for PBT with improved electrical performance for use in automotive connectors for electric hybrid vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sarah J.H. Kuhlman, Susan I. Hill
Abstract The American Chemistry Council sponsored program to optimize a specimen design for use in high strain rate testing of long fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (LFRT) was experimentally validated through testing of injection molded long glass-filled polypropylene (LGFPP) and long glass filled Nylon ® (Nylon). It was demonstrated that the dynamic specimen geometry generated valid results for LFRT tensile tests in the quasi-static through 400/s regime. Optimum specimen size depended on the maximum test rates and end use of the data. The program results provide a basis to select specimen parameters to appropriately represent LFRT or similar materials for comparison or material property testing. Tests established the effects of injection technique; strain rate (nominal 0.1/s to 400/s); fiber fill content (20wt%, 30wt%, 40wt%), specimen type and width, panel thickness, distance to the fill gate, flow orientation, and material homogeneity. Not all variables were tested using material from both vendors.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Hideto Komurasaki, Kenichi Uchida
This study aimed to visualize crack initiation and propagation of rubber at low temperatures. Typical fatigue behavior such as cracking at only the compressed part of rubber products like dustcovers during oscillation tests at ultra-low temperatures have been reported [1]. Rubber products are usually used at temperatures where good rubber elasticity can be obtained. However, in some cases, they are used near glass transition temperatures at which rubber elasticity is poor. Fatigue failures of rubbers generally occur due to existing defects in the rubber material, and rubber tends to fracture easily near glass transition temperatures due to cracking on the surface of the compressed side of the rubber. The observation of the crack initiation process of rubber is difficult at low temperatures because the fracture patterns on rubber disappear when elasticity is recovered at room temperature. For this reason, in this study, we aimed to observe the fatigue behavior of rubber near the glass transition temperature by testing rubber materials whose Tg is above room temperature.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael D. Kass, Timothy Theiss, Steve Pawel, James Baustian, Les Wolf, Wolf Koch, Chris Janke
The compatibility of elastomeric materials used in fuel storage and dispensing applications was determined for test fuels representing neat gasoline and gasoline blends containing 10 and 17 vol.% ethanol, and 16 and 24 vol.% isobutanol. The actual test fuel chemistries were based on the aggressive formulations described in SAE J1681 for oxygenated gasoline. Elastomer specimens of fluorocarbon, fluorosilicone, acrylonitrile rubber (NBR), polyurethane, neoprene, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) and silicone were exposed to the test fuels for 4 weeks at 60°C. After measuring the wetted volume and hardness, the specimens were dried for 20 hours at 60°C and then remeasured for volume and hardness. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was also performed to determine the glass transition temperature (Tg). Comparison to the original values showed that all elastomer materials experienced volume expansion and softening when wetted by the test fuels. The fluorocarbons underwent the least amount of swelling (<25 %) while the SBR and silicone samples exhibited the highest level of expansion (>100%).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 5520

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