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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2751
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0525
Sameer Srivastava, Sandeep Raina, Kapil Kumar Pandey, Arnab Sandilya, Shankar Bose, Kumar Vivek
An automobile Carpet comprises a face fabric (Poly Ehtylene Terephthalate a.k.a PET) for aesthetics with Poly Ethylene lamination/backing (for strength such as Tear, Abrasion etc and Sound barriers to some extent) and Silencer pads functioning as Sound Absorbers and cushioning effect. In a strive to maintain quality, myriads of checks/tests are done during the part development stages. However, in due course of time its exposure to Sunlight and severe weather conditions degenerate the aesthetic quality. Carpets prepared with appropriate additives, UV stabilizers, apposite lamination/backing have shown protracted and extended performance. This paper relates to effects of ageing on aesthetic performance of Automotive Non-Woven Fabrics.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0286
Changsheng Wang, Haijiang Liu, Tao Zhang, Zhiyong Zhu, Liang Liu
With the increasing development in automotive industry, finite element (FE) analysis with model bias prediction has been used more and more widely in the fields of chassis design, body weight reduction optimization and some components development, which reduced the development cycles and enhanced analysis accuracy significantly. However, in the simulation process of plastic fuel tank system, there is few study of model validation or verification, which results that non-risky design decisions cannot be enhanced due to too much consuming time. In this study, to correct the discrepancy and uncertainty of the simulated finite element model, Bayesian inference-based method is employed, to quantify model uncertainty and evaluate the simulated results based on collected data from real mechanical tests of plastic fuel tanks and FE simulations under the same boundary conditions.
2016-04-05
Journal Article
2016-01-0497
Brian Falzon, Wei Tan
The development of the latest generation of wide-body carbon-fibre composite passenger aircraft has heralded a new era in the utilisation of these materials. The premise of superior specific strength and stiffness, corrosion and fatigue resistance, is tempered by high development costs, slow production rates and lengthy and expensive certification programmes. Substantial effort is currently being directed towards the development of new modelling and simulation tools, at all levels of the development cycle, to mitigate these shortcomings. One of the primary challenges is to reduce the extent of physical testing, in the certification process, by adopting a ‘certification by simulation’ approach. In essence, this aspirational objective requires the ability to reliably predict the evolution and progression of damage in composites. The aerospace industry has been at the forefront of developing advanced composites modelling tools.
2016-02-01
Technical Paper
2016-28-0224
Akshay Ramesh Karjol, Ajay Virmalwar
Abstract Reducing overall weight of the vehicle is one of the main areas of research in automotive industries. Current trend, CO2 reduction, is a major incentive for this process. For this, engineers are finding out various ways to reduce weight to strength ratio of the different components. The immediate pay-off of such developments is lower fuel consumption, which is followed by lower CO2 emissions. For this engineers opt for, use of low-density and high-strength materials, along with optimization of the geometry of the components. One of the solutions is to convert metal parts to plastics which have desired properties. The main focus of this paper is to convert the sheet metal brackets to plastic brackets which will ultimately reduce weight and production cost associated with automobile. In this paper, an optimum process, using Topology optimization and Mold Flow Analysis, is developed to convert sheet metal bracket to plastic bracket.
2015-12-29
WIP Standard
J361
This SAE Recommended Practice applies to parts and materials used in vehicle manufacture which are intended to be acceptable color matches to a specified standard. This document is intended for use with parts or materials which are opaque or nearly so. Materials covered by this document include topcoat paint finishes, interior soft trim, interior and exterior hard trim, and exterior film and flexible trim. The intent of this document is to precisely specify procedures for the visual evaluation of appearance of colored materials or parts incorporated in the manufacture of vehicles. The document provides a consistent engineering practice for the determination of visual color difference between materials or parts of the same or like materials. A suitable fixture providing daylight, fluorescent, and horizon lighting conditions is necessary for this evaluation.
2015-12-14
WIP Standard
J2412
This test method specifies the operating procedures for a controlled irradiance, xenon arc apparatus used for the accelerated exposure of various automotive interior trim components. Test duration as well as any exceptions to the specimen preparation and performance evaluation procedures contained in this document, are covered in material specifications of the different automotive manufacturers. Any deviation to this test method, such as filter combinations, is to be agreed upon by contractual parties.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
AMS3678/2B
This specification covers a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin filled with 15% graphite in the form of extruded or molded rods or tubes which are sintered after molding or, in the case of extrusions, sintered during the extrusion process.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
AMS3678/4B
This specification covers a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin filled with 25% glass fiber in the form of extruded or molded rods or tubes which are sintered after molding or, in the case of extrusions, sintered during the extrusion process.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
AMS3678/3B
This specification covers a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin filled with 15% glass fiber and 5% molybdenum disulfide in the form of extruded or molded rods or tubes which are sintered after molding or, in the case of extrusions, sintered during the extrusion process.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
AMS3678/6B
This specification covers a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin filled with 60% bronze powder in the form of extruded or molded rods or tubes which are sintered after molding or, in the case of extrusions, sintered during the extrusion process.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
AMS3678/5B
This specification covers a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin filled with inorganic pigment in the form of extruded or molded rods or tubes which are sintered after molding or, in the case of extrusions, sintered during the extrusion process.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
AMS3678D
This specification covers several grades of virgin polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin which may be compounded with pigment and fillers in the form of extruded or molded rods or tubes which are sintered after molding or, in the case of extrusions, sintered during the extrusion process.
2015-12-11
WIP Standard
AMS3678/1C
This specification covers an unfilled grade of virgin polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin in the form of extruded or molded rods or tubes which are sintered after molding or, in the case of extrusions, sintered during the extrusion process.
2015-12-02
Standard
AS33391B
No scope available.
2015-11-03
Video
Dow is driving innovation for the future. From the structural integrity of vehicles, to driver safety features, to enhanced durability, Dow science and technology ensures sustainable solutions to anticipate market demand.
2015-10-22
Standard
AMS2535B
This specification covers requirements for poly-monochloro-para-xylylene coatings. Primarily for use as a secondary moisture barrier coating on hybrid microcircuit substrates and on active monolithic devices. Additionally, the coating immobilizes undesirable particles remaining in sealed microcircuits and enhances to some degree the strength of fine wire interconnections.
2015-10-13
WIP Standard
AMSS83318C
This specification covers two-component polysulfide sealing compounds, temperature resistant, for use from -65 to 250 °F (-54 to 121 °C), low temperature curing from 20 °F (-13 °C) minimum, for quick repair of integral fuel tanks and fuel cell cavities. During application, sealing compound shall exhibit suitable, fluid consistency.
2015-10-01
Standard
AS23190C
AS23190 is a procurement specification that covers a series of plastic and metal components and devices used for the tying, positioning, and supporting cable, cable assemblies, wire, and wire bundles in electrical, electronic and communication equipment, and in interconnection systems.
2015-07-06
Standard
AMS3833B
This specification covers a polyester and cotton blended broadcloth, chemically treated with a durable press finish and cured.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2204
Michael Funderburg
The ability of various plasticizers to impact the vibration damping properties of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisols was investigated. A material must have good viscoelastic properties in order for it to be an effective vibration damper. However, it is evident that not all viscoelastic materials are good vibration dampers. Consider flexible (plasticized) PVC, for example. PVC formulations demonstrating the same glass transition temperature may have widely different damping capabilities. This presentation will show that the type of plasticizer substantially impacts the damping ability of the final PVC composite. Initially, flexible PVC formulations with varied plasticizers were screened via dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) to determine which ones would likely have good damping properties. Formulations which exhibited promising results with DMTA were then tested via an Oberst bar damping test (SAE J1637).
2015-05-26
Standard
J1647_201505
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements to evaluate the suitability of plastic optical materials for possible use in discharge forward lighting (DFL) devices in motor vehicles. These materials are typically used for lenses and reflectors. Separate testing is required for each combination of material, industrial coating, DFL light source, and device focal length. The tests are intended to determine physical and optical characteristics of the materials and coatings. Performance expectations of finished assemblies, including plastic components, are to be based on tests for lighting devices, as specified in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices for motor vehicle lighting equipment. Optical components exposed to weathering should also be subject to SAE J576.
2015-05-13
Standard
AMS3529B
This specification covers an unpigmented grade of vinyl plastic, unfilled and not containing plasticizer, in the form of sheet and film.
2015-05-13
Standard
AMS3661D
This specification covers one grade of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) resin in the form of film and film tape.
2015-05-04
WIP Standard
J576
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements to evaluate the suitability of plastic materials intended for optical applications in motor vehicles. The tests are intended to determine physical and optical characteristics of the material only. Performance expectations of finished assemblies, including plastic components, are to be based on tests for lighting devices, as specified in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices for motor vehicle lighting equipment. Field experience has shown that plastic materials meeting the requirements of this document and molded in accordance with good molding practices will produce durable lighting devices.
2015-04-28
Standard
J863_201504
This SAE Recommended Practice describes methods for determining plastic deformation encountered in the forming or drawing of sheet steel.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0476
Hyunkwon Jo, Youngseung Kim, Hyunchul Lee, Hyunmin Park, Suckin Song
Abstract Carmakers have tried to lower the vehicle weight for raising fuel efficiency. This trend involves a trade-off with the vehicle stiffness. In automobile interior parts, the thickness has needed to be decreased for the weight reduction but this makes the stiffness worse. A new approach for improving the stiffness due to the weight reduction is required and various optimization methods at early development stage have been introduced currently. However, it is difficult to apply optimization for the interior parts since many interior parts' structures generally depend on the design. But as studying the structure in detail, we discovered some factors that affect the performance without depending on design. The door trim is selected for optimization item because it has many characteristics of automobile interior parts. In our case study, the factors that improve the performance of door trim without changing design are considered as fastener position and flange rib layout.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0593
Guobiao Yang, Changqing Du, Dajun Zhou, Xiaona Li, Yongjun Zhou, Biyu Ye, Xinfeng Shi, Yaqian Zheng, Junrui Li, Lianxiang Yang
Abstract Material formability is a very important aspect in the automotive stamping, which must be tested for the success of manufacturing. One of the most important sheet metal formability parameters for the stamping is the edge tear-ability. In this paper, a novel test method has been present to test the aluminum sheet edge tear-ability with 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. The newly developed test specimen and fixture design are also presented. In order to capture the edge deformation and strain, sample's edge surface has been sprayed with artificial speckle. A standard MTS tensile machine was used to record the tearing load and displacement. Through the data processing and evaluation of sequence image, testing results are found valid and reliable. The results show that the 3D DIC system with double CCD can effectively carry out sheet edge tear deformation. The edge tearing test method is found to be a simple, reliable, high precision, and able to provide useful results.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0698
Danielle Zeng, Li Lu, Jin Zhou, Yang Li, Z. Xia, Paul Hoke, Kurt Danielson, Dustin Souza
Abstract Long fiber reinforced plastics (LFRP) have exhibited superior mechanical performance and outstanding design flexibility, bringing them with increasing popularity in the automotive structural design. Due to the injection molding process, the distribution of long fibers varies at different locations throughout the part, resulting in anisotropic and non-uniform mechanical properties of the final LFRP parts. Images from X-ray CT scan of the materials show that local volume fraction of the long fibers tends to be higher at core than at skin layer. Also fibers are bundled and tangled to form clusters. Most of the current micromechanical material models used for LFRP are extended from those for short fibers without adequate validation. The effect of the complexity of long fibers on the material properties is not appropriately considered.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2751

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