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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2720
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Ralf Schomaker, Richard Pedwell, Björn Knickrehm
Abstract As a result of the increasing use of fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) components in a modern commercial aircraft, manufacturers are facing new challenges - especially with regards to the realisation of significant build rates. One challenge is the larger variation of the thickness of FRP components compared with metal parts that can normally be manufactured within a very narrow thickness tolerance bandwidth. The larger thickness variation of composite structures has an impact on the shape of the component and especially on the surfaces intended to be joined together with other components. As a result, gaps between the components to be assembled could be encountered. However, from a structural point of view, gaps can only be accepted to a certain extent in order to maintain the structural integrity of the joint. Today's state of the art technologies to close gaps between FRP structures comprise shimming methods using liquid and solid shims. Another option is the use of peelable shims that offer significant economic benefits compared with liquid and solid shims.
Standard
2014-08-20
Scope is unavailable.
WIP Standard
2014-08-06
This specification and its supplementary detail specifications cover organic fibers in the form of continuous, multifilament yarn and roving. These products have been used typically for use in weaving or as reinforcement in composites for structural applications, but usage is not limited to such applications. Each application should be considered individually.
Standard
2014-06-04
This SAE Standard provides a means for specifying or describing the pertinent properties of fiberboards for automotive applications. The materials normally specified by this standard are defined in SAE J947. The test methods commonly used for fiberboards are defined in SAE J315.
Standard
2014-06-03
This SAE Recommended Practice is designed to reveal discoloration which may occur when nonmetallic materials used for trimming automobiles are exposed for a limited time to an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide. NOTE 1: CAUTION-Hydrogen sulfide gas is extremely hazardous. Use of this substance may be fatal if proper precautions are not taken. This test method does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this document to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. NOTE 2: A fume hood and adequate ventilation should be provided at all times during testing.
WIP Standard
2014-05-29
This SAE Recommended Practice determines whether plastic and glass-plastic safety glazing materials will successfully withstand exposure to simulated weathering conditions.
WIP Standard
2014-05-23
This test method specifies the operating conditions for a fluorescent ultraviolet (UV) and condensation apparatus used for the accelerated exposure of various automotive exterior components. Specimen preparation, test duration, and performance evaluation procedures are addressed by each automotive manufacturerÕs material specifications. This SAE Standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This document does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this document to consult and establish appropriate and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Significance and Use This test method is designed to simulate extreme environmental conditions encountered on the outside of an automobile due to sunlight, heat, and to provide an acceleration of exposure for the purpose of predicting the performance of exterior automotive materials. Unless otherwise specified, all dimensions reported in this method are nominal.
Standard
2014-05-20
This procedure is used to determine seam strength and seam fatigue of automotive textiles, vinyl coated fabrics and related soft trim materials.
WIP Standard
2014-05-20
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to cover plastic safety glazing for use in motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment. Nominal specifications for thickness, flatness, curvature, size, and fabrication details are presented principally for the guidance of body engineers and designers. For additional information on plastic safety glazing materials for use in motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment, please see SAE J674.
Event
2014-05-06
WIP Standard
2014-05-05
This specification establishes the requirements for an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (EPTFE) in the form of sealing tape requiring no curing.

This tape has been used typically for sealing aircraft access panels, pressure barriers, mold line surface close-out panels where gaskets are required, but usage is not limited to such applications. The tape is resistant to aircraft fuels, fluids an lubricants, and is capable of withstanding long-term exposure from -65 to +450 degrees F (-54 to +232 degress C) with short term exposures up to 6000 degrees F (315 degrees C).

Technical Paper
2014-04-28
Saral Bhanshali
Abstract This breakthrough development involves material conversion from aluminum die cast to polypropylene long fiber thermoplastic (40% long glass filled) for a two wheeler bracket of a leading automotive OEM. The plastic bracket was developed working in collaboration with the molder, glass supplier, technology collaborator and the OEM. The new part needed to be designed lighter in weight, easier to process and suitable for painting, outdoor exposure and stringent dynamic conditions. The scope of this study includes the evaluation of the new material from different viewpoints and comparison of the same with the existing material. The submission will go through the intricate analyses carried out in the development process and highlight the key advantages over aluminum. Studies will include static and dynamic analysis, fiber orientation studies, gate location studies, etc.
Technical Paper
2014-04-28
R Srikanth
Abstract A new damage model based on the Continuum Damage Model [Ref. 1] has been implemented in MSC Marc. It can simulate three process of damage evolution namely: void generation, growth and coalescence. By deactivating the element when a certain damage value is reached, users can now simulate a whole range of damage process; from micro crack to macro crack growth. Micromechanical models like continuum damage mechanics (CDM) deal damage and failures as characteristics based on material and not as geometry configuration. These models are analyzed and validated only for simple geometrical configurations like uniaxial tensile bar, rotating beam specimen etc. A detailed assessment of the geometry transferability, mesh sensitivity and plasticity effects has been addressed only in a limited number of works. In this paper, CDM approach, as proposed by Bonora is used to model and verify ductile damage processes for various stress states (triaxiality), and mesh sizes, thus validating its use across various models used in industries.
Event
2014-04-10
This session will cover a very broad range of applications, processes and technologies as the title suggests.
Video
2014-04-10
Bob Akins, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, DSM Engineering Plastics Americas, talks with Automotive Engineering on the show floor of the SAE 2014 World Congress, touching on the latest developments in engineered plastics and the continued push toward lighter, cheaper, greener.
Standard
2014-04-03
This PS specifies the batch release and delivery requirements for epoxy resin systems (base resin and curing agent) used for wet lay-up repair purposes. This specification relates to qualified epoxy resin systems listed in the associated QPL.
Collection
2014-04-01
This technical paper collection will cover a very broad range of applications, processes and technologies on plastic components.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Michael D. Kass, Chris Janke, Timothy Theiss, Steve Pawel, James Baustian, Les Wolf, Wolf Koch
The compatibility of plastic materials used in gasoline storage and dispensing applications was determined for test fuels representing neat gasoline (Fuel C), and blends containing 25% ethanol (CE25a), 16% isobutanol (CiBu16a), and 24% isobutanol (CiBu24a). A solubility analysis was also performed and compared to the volume swell results obtained from the test fuel exposures. The plastic specimens were exposed to each test fuel for16 weeks at 60°C. After measuring the wetted volume and hardness, the specimens were dried for 65 hours at 60°C and then remeasured for volume and hardness. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), which measures the storage modulus as a function of temperature, was also performed on the dried specimens to determine the temperature associated with the onset of the glass-to-rubber transition (Tg). For many of the plastic materials, the solubility analysis was able to predict the relative volume swell for each test fuel. Those plastic materials commonly used as permeation barriers exhibited the least amount of volume and hardness change (<5%) when exposed to the test fuels.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ashok Mache, Anindya Deb, G.S. Venkatesh
Abstract Natural fiber-based composites such as jute-polyester composites have the potential to be more cost-effective and environment-friendly substitutes for glass fiber-reinforced composites which are commonly found in many applications. In an earlier study (Mache and Deb [1]), jute-polyester composite tubes of circular and square cross-sections were shown to perform competitively under axial impact loading conditions when compared to similar components made of bidirectional E-glass fiber mats and thermo-setting polyester resin. For jute-reinforced plastic panels to be feasible solutions for automotive interior trim panels, laminates made of such materials should have adequate perforation resistance. In the current study, a systematic characterization of jute-polyester and glass-polyester composite laminates made by compression molding is at first carried out under quasi-static tensile, compressive and flexural loading conditions. Low velocity impact perforation tests at speeds of around 4 m/s are then performed in an instrumented drop-weight testing device on square plates extracted from the same laminates.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Gihwan Kim, Chi-Hoon Choi, You Sung Moon, Yong Sun (Steven) Jin
Abstract The main contribution of this paper is to employ a sound and vibration theory in order to develop a light and cost effective plastic intercooler pipe. The intercooler pipe was composed of two rubber hoses and one aluminum pipe mounted between an ACV (Air Control Valve) and an intercooler outlet. The engineering design concept is to incorporate low-vibration type bellows and an impedance-mismatched center pipe, which replaces the rubber hoses and aluminum pipe respectively. The bellows were designed to adapt powertrain movement for high vibration transmission loss to the intercooler outlet. Also, the impedance-mismatched center pipe was implemented to increase reflected wave by using relatively higher modulus than bellows part and applying a SeCo (Sequential Coextrusion) processing method.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Praveensingh Jadhav, Aditya Nanda, Manas Tripathi, Amit Kumar, Shriganesh Umbarkar
Abstract Global automobile market is very sensitive to vehicle fuel economy. Gross vehicle weight has substantial effects on FE. Hence, for designers it becomes utmost important to work on the weight reduction ideas up to single component level. Fuel delivery pipe (Fuel Rail) is one such component where there is a big potential. Fuel rail is an integral part of the vehicle fuel system and is mounted on the engine. Primarily it serves as a channel of fuel supply from fuel tank through fuel lines to the multiple fuel injectors, which further sprays the fuel into intake ports at high pressure. Due to opening and closing of injectors, pulsations are generated in fuel lines, so fuel rail also acts as a surge tank as well as a pulsation damper. All these factors make the design of a fuel rail very critical and unique for a particular engine. Materials like aluminum, plastic and sheet metal are generally used for fuel rail manufacturing. In this technical paper, design considerations for plastic fuel rail are explained.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Josh Mcilvaine, Malika Warner
Abstract Thermoplastic polyesters are widely used in the automotive industry and are the material of choice for many types of electrical and electronic components due to their excellent balance of mechanical and electrical properties. Under certain conditions including elevated temperatures and the presence of high humidity, thermoplastic polyesters such as polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) have the potential to suffer hydrolytic attack. Recognizing the need for standardization, USCAR USCAR (The United States Council for Automotive Research) established component level testing guidelines specific to connectors. In response, many companies developed HR (hydrolysis resistant) PBT resins to help manufactures meet these requirements. As with many additive technologies in plastics, there are trade-offs. In this case, hydrolysis resistance was often improved at the expense of melt viscosity stability and high flow during the injection molding process. In addition to improved hydrolysis resistance, there is an emerging need for PBT with improved electrical performance for use in automotive connectors for electric hybrid vehicles.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Kwang-Ho Oh, Won Hee Han, Jun-Ho Jang, Yong-Choo Tho, Hak Hyun Kim
Abstract Light weighting is a critical objective in the automotive industry to improve fuel efficiency. But when redesigning parts for light weight, by changing from metal to plastic, the resulting design gives NVH issues due to differences in part mass and material stiffness. Many parts were not converted from metal to plastic because of NVH issues that could not be solved. Many engine parts such as cylinder head cover, air intake manifold, oil pan and etc. previously made of metal have since long been replaced with plastic. But timing chain cover has not been replaced because of the aforementioned issue. Sealing performance due to the dynamic characteristics of the application is another challenging factor. In this paper, the key aspects of the plastic timing chain cover as well as its advantage are presented.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sunit Kumar Chanana, Arpit Kapila, Sanjay Haldar, Naman Joshi, Dinesh N Dave
Abstract Plastics nowadays are playing a vital role in the ongoing innovation that is driving the automotive industry to higher performance, safety and sustainability levels. Plastics have allowed automotive designers to meet stringent carbon emission targets and fulfill consumer demands for highly fuel efficient vehicles by reducing vehicle weight while also reducing cost. The next step in weight reduction is to decrease the plastic part thickness further to the minimum possible. But with such reduction in part thickness, it becomes very difficult to meet the side impact crash regulations, and thus it becomes imperative to increase the Impact properties of such light weight materials. Keeping in line with the above, this paper describes the development of a new blend of Polypropylene which has high impact characteristics to meet crash compliance, high MFR to reduce cycle time and allow for easy filling of low thickness parts and keeping specific gravity in check to reduce weight. This is achieved through usage of high rubber content in Base PP itself in addition to conventional usage of rubber during compounding stage.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Ali Fatemi, Steve Mellot, Abolhassan Khosrovaneh, Charles Buehler
Abstract An experimental investigation was conducted to evaluate tensile and fatigue behaviors of two thermoplastics, a neat impact polypropylene and a mineral and elastomer reinforced polyolefin. Tensile tests were performed at various strain rates at room, −40°C, and 85°C temperatures with specimens cut parallel and perpendicular to the mold flow direction. Tensile properties were determined from these tests and mathematical relations were developed to represent tensile properties as a function of strain rate and temperature. For fatigue behavior, the effects considered include mold flow direction, mean stress, and temperature. Tension-compression as well as tension-tension load-controlled fatigue tests were performed at room temperature, −40°C and 85°C. The effect of mean stress was modeled using the Walker mean stress model and a simple model with a mean stress sensitivity factor.
Technical Paper
2014-04-01
Sarah J.H. Kuhlman, Susan I. Hill
Abstract The American Chemistry Council sponsored program to optimize a specimen design for use in high strain rate testing of long fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (LFRT) was experimentally validated through testing of injection molded long glass-filled polypropylene (LGFPP) and long glass filled Nylon ® (Nylon). It was demonstrated that the dynamic specimen geometry generated valid results for LFRT tensile tests in the quasi-static through 400/s regime. Optimum specimen size depended on the maximum test rates and end use of the data. The program results provide a basis to select specimen parameters to appropriately represent LFRT or similar materials for comparison or material property testing. Tests established the effects of injection technique; strain rate (nominal 0.1/s to 400/s); fiber fill content (20wt%, 30wt%, 40wt%), specimen type and width, panel thickness, distance to the fill gate, flow orientation, and material homogeneity. Not all variables were tested using material from both vendors.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2720

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