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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2731
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1380
Kumar Kumar
According to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), from the most recent available data, it was estimated that there were 164,000 highway vehicle fires in 2013 causing roughly 300 civilian fire deaths, 925 civilian fire injuries and $1.1 billion in property damages. In a modern automobile, the plastics content is dramatically higher than it was in 1972, when Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 302 was implemented. FMVSS 302 applies only to materials in the passenger compartment and was put in place to address accidental fires started from sources such as cigarettes, matches, etc. There has never been any regulation for the plastic materials used outside the vehicle interior, including those used in under-the-hood (UTH) applications, and this is true even for today’s automobiles. Combustible materials are roughly twice the weight and represent twice the heat content of the gasoline used in a typical passenger car today, constituting the major fire load.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1341
Hisaki Sugaya, Yoshiyuki Tosa, Kazuo Imura, Hiroyuki Mae
When airbags deploy they break a plastic tear part of the instrument panel. Timing and the tear fracture process change the airbag’s deployment behavior. The tear fracture process is dependent on the plastic’s temperature. We developed a tear fracture simulation . Because the tear line is composed of 1mm width and 0.5mm-3.0mm flute thickness, simulating the tear fracture process is difficult, even using two models: airbag deployment, and plastic fracture. Thickness determines the tear fracture. The strain distribution of its parts should be predicted accurately. The tear fracture using solid mesh, which is 0.1mm mesh pitch, is predictable. Although it is a very complicated model and has a high computation cost, it is not applicable to the mass production development. We increase the accuracy of the tear fracture process prediction using the shell mesh, which is applicable to the mass production development.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0698
Danielle Zeng, Li Lu, Jin Zhou, Yang Li, Z. Xia, Paul Hoke, Kurt Danielson, Dustin Souza
Abstract Long fiber reinforced plastics (LFRP) have exhibited superior mechanical performance and outstanding design flexibility, bringing them with increasing popularity in the automotive structural design. Due to the injection molding process, the distribution of long fibers varies at different locations throughout the part, resulting in anisotropic and non-uniform mechanical properties of the final LFRP parts. Images from X-ray CT scan of the materials show that local volume fraction of the long fibers tends to be higher at core than at skin layer. Also fibers are bundled and tangled to form clusters. Most of the current micromechanical material models used for LFRP are extended from those for short fibers without adequate validation. The effect of the complexity of long fibers on the material properties is not appropriately considered.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0593
Guobiao Yang, Changqing Du, Dajun Zhou, Xiaona Li, Yongjun Zhou, Biyu Ye, Xinfeng Shi, Yaqian Zheng, Junrui Li, Lianxiang Yang
Abstract Material formability is a very important aspect in the automotive stamping, which must be tested for the success of manufacturing. One of the most important sheet metal formability parameters for the stamping is the edge tear-ability. In this paper, a novel test method has been present to test the aluminum sheet edge tear-ability with 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. The newly developed test specimen and fixture design are also presented. In order to capture the edge deformation and strain, sample's edge surface has been sprayed with artificial speckle. A standard MTS tensile machine was used to record the tearing load and displacement. Through the data processing and evaluation of sequence image, testing results are found valid and reliable. The results show that the 3D DIC system with double CCD can effectively carry out sheet edge tear deformation. The edge tearing test method is found to be a simple, reliable, high precision, and able to provide useful results.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0894
Michael D. Kass, Chris Janke, Timothy Theiss, James Baustian, Leslie Wolf, Wolf Koch
Abstract The compatibility of plastic materials used in fuel storage and dispensing applications was determined for a test fuel representing gasoline blended with 10% ethanol. Prior investigations were performed on gasoline fuels containing 25, 50 and 85% ethanol, but the knowledge gap existing from 0 to 25% ethanol precluded accurate compatibility assessment of low level blends, especially for the current E10 fuel (gasoline containing 10% ethanol) used in most filling stations, and the recently accepted E15 fuel blend (gasoline blended with up to15% ethanol). For the majority of the plastic materials evaluated in this study, the wet volume swell (which is the parameter most commonly used to assess compatibility) was higher for fuels containing 25% ethanol, while the volume swell accompanying E10 was much lower.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-0893
Michael D. Kass, Chris Janke, Raynella Connatser, Sam Lewis, James Keiser, Timothy Theiss
Abstract The compatibility of plastic materials used in fuel storage and dispensing applications was determined for an off-highway diesel fuel and a blend containing 20% bio-oil (Bio20) derived from a fast pyrolysis process. Bio20 is not to be confused with B20, which is a diesel blend containing 20% biodiesel. The feedstock, processing, and chemistry of biodiesel are markedly different from bio-oil. Plastic materials included those identified for use as seals, coatings, piping and fiberglass resins, but many are also used in vehicle fueling systems. The plastic specimens were exposed to the two fuel types for 16 weeks at 60°C. After measuring the wetted volume and hardness, the specimens were dried for 65 hours at 60°C and then remeasured to determine extent of property change. A solubility analysis was performed to better understand the performance of plastic materials in fuel blends composed of bio-oil and diesel.
2015-03-24
WIP Standard
J1647
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements to evaluate the suitability of plastic optical materials for possible use in discharge forward lighting (DFL) devices in motor vehicles. These materials are typically used for lenses and reflectors. Separate testing is required for each combination of material, industrial coating, DFL light source, and device focal length. The tests are intended to determine physical and optical characteristics of the materials and coatings. Performance expectations of finished assemblies, including plastic components, are to be based on tests for lighting devices, as specified in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices for motor vehicle lighting equipment. Optical components exposed to weathering should also be subject to SAE J576.
2015-03-19
WIP Standard
AMS3699B
This specification covers a two-part epoxy resin system in the form of a bisphenol "A" epoxy resin filled with fumed silica and carbon microspheres nd a separate curing agent.
2015-01-15
Standard
J1647_201501
This SAE Recommended Practice provides test methods and requirements to evaluate the suitability of plastic optical materials for possible use in discharge forward lighting (DFL) devices in motor vehicles. These materials are typically used for lenses and reflectors. Separate testing is required for each combination of material, industrial coating, DFL light source, and device focal length. The tests are intended to determine physical and optical characteristics of the materials and coatings. Performance expectations of finished assemblies, including plastic components, are to be based on tests for lighting devices, as specified in SAE Standards and Recommended Practices for motor vehicle lighting equipment. Optical components exposed to weathering should also be subject to SAE J576.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0242
Rolf Bücker
Abstract Future doors require light weight, cost efficient and acoustic optimized solutions. Current steel doors offer only a small range of possibilities in these areas. With the use of aluminum doors the weight will be reduced but production complexity and costs will be increased. A modular door approach supports all of these future demands. Door modules have set milestones for door concepts in the past. Due to technological progress, door modules are more relevant in the current scenario. The use of reinforced plastics allows a high degree of design freedom with high integration of features.[2] In addition to weight reduction of up to 1.5kg per door the complete production process comes leaner with a higher grade of quality. The acoustic performance of a door system can be adjusted for noise reduction and improvement of the sound quality of speakers as illustrated. Functional integration is the key driver of weight and cost reduction
2015-01-08
Standard
AMS2491F
This specification covers the engineering requirements for preparing surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for bonding and the properties resulting from the treatment. This process has been used typically for rendering surfaces of parts capable of supporting a high strength adhesive bond. The bonding preparation can affect the electrical properties of the PTFE and this should be considered before using it for treatment of electronic components.
2014-11-03
WIP Standard
AIR4170B
This document describes the initial development, evolution and use of reticulated polyurethane foam as an explosion suppression material in fuel tanks and dry bays. It provides historical data, design practice guidelines, references, laboratory test data, and service data gained from past experience. The products discussed in this document may be referred to as 'Safety Foam,' 'Reticulated Polyurethane Foam,' 'Baffle and Inserting Material,' 'Electrostatic Suppression Material,' or 'SAFOAM.' These generic terms for the products discussed in this document are not meant to imply any safety warranty. Each individual design application should be thoroughly proof tested prior to production installation.
2014-10-30
Standard
AS90387C
Scope is unavailable.
2014-09-30
Technical Paper
2014-01-2365
Vinod Kumar Mannaru, Sunil M Makhe, Lori Stephens, Dinesh Kumar, Shivaprasad Goud
Abstract Vapor management system is critical to manage fuel tank capacity, evaporative emissions and pressure control for hybrid applications. Due to stringent emission norms and other regulations there has been lot of advancements in design and application of vapor control valves that are used in automotive fuel tanks. Continuous exposure of these valves to fuel vapor or fuel in some instances led to swelling of assemblies and poses serious threat to product functionality and maintaining required tolerances. Swelling of plastics in fuel is ideally a case of multi physics, which involves modeling of complex mass transfer phenomena. In this study a simple thermal analogous approach has been used to model swelling behavior by characterizing the basic plastic-fuel soaking through coefficient of hygroscopic swelling. Extensive testing has been performed with multiple plastic-fuel combinations with different shapes at different temperatures.
2014-09-16
Journal Article
2014-01-2253
Ralf Schomaker, Richard Pedwell, Björn Knickrehm
Abstract As a result of the increasing use of fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) components in a modern commercial aircraft, manufacturers are facing new challenges - especially with regards to the realisation of significant build rates. One challenge is the larger variation of the thickness of FRP components compared with metal parts that can normally be manufactured within a very narrow thickness tolerance bandwidth. The larger thickness variation of composite structures has an impact on the shape of the component and especially on the surfaces intended to be joined together with other components. As a result, gaps between the components to be assembled could be encountered. However, from a structural point of view, gaps can only be accepted to a certain extent in order to maintain the structural integrity of the joint. Today's state of the art technologies to close gaps between FRP structures comprise shimming methods using liquid and solid shims.
2014-09-12
Standard
SSB1_003A
This document is an annex to EIA Engineering Bulletin SAB-1, Guidelines for Using Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits and Semiconductors in Military, Aerospace and Other Rugged Applications (the latest revision). This document provided reference information concerning acceleration factors commonly used by device manufacturers to model failure rates in conjunction with statistical reliability monitoring. These acceleration factors are frequently used by OEMs in conjunction with physics of failure reliability analysis to assess the suitability of plastic encapsulated microcircuits and semiconductors for specific end use applications.
2014-09-12
Standard
SSB1_001
This document is an annex to EIA Engineering Bulletin, SSB-1, Guidelines for Using Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits and Semiconductors in Military, Aerospace and Other Rugges Applications (the latest revision). The scope of this document is to establish the recommended minimum qualification and monitoring testing of plastic encapsulated microcircuits and discrete semiconductors suitable for potential use in many rugged, military, severe, or other environments.
2014-09-12
Standard
SSB1_002
This document is an annex to EIA Engineering Bulletin SSB-1. Guidelines for Using Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits and Semiconductors in Military, Aerospace and Other Rugged Applications. This document provides reference information concerning the environmental stresses associated with tests specifically designed to apply to (or have unique implications for) plastic encapsulated microcircuits and semiconductors, and the specific failures induced by these environmental stresses.
2014-08-20
Standard
AS25281B
Scope is unavailable.
2014-08-06
WIP Standard
AMS3901D
This specification and its supplementary detail specifications cover organic fibers in the form of continuous, multifilament yarn and roving. These products have been used typically for use in weaving or as reinforcement in composites for structural applications, but usage is not limited to such applications. Each application should be considered individually.
2014-06-04
Standard
J1323_201406
This SAE Standard provides a means for specifying or describing the pertinent properties of fiberboards for automotive applications. The materials normally specified by this standard are defined in SAE J947. The test methods commonly used for fiberboards are defined in SAE J315.
2014-06-03
Standard
J322_201406
This SAE Recommended Practice is designed to reveal discoloration which may occur when nonmetallic materials used for trimming automobiles are exposed for a limited time to an atmosphere containing hydrogen sulfide. NOTE 1: CAUTION-Hydrogen sulfide gas is extremely hazardous. Use of this substance may be fatal if proper precautions are not taken. This test method does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this document to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. NOTE 2: A fume hood and adequate ventilation should be provided at all times during testing.
2014-05-29
WIP Standard
J2081
This SAE Recommended Practice determines whether plastic and glass-plastic safety glazing materials will successfully withstand exposure to simulated weathering conditions.
2014-05-23
WIP Standard
J2020
This test method specifies the operating conditions for a fluorescent ultraviolet (UV) and condensation apparatus used for the accelerated exposure of various automotive exterior components. Specimen preparation, test duration, and performance evaluation procedures are addressed by each automotive manufacturerÕs material specifications. This SAE Standard may involve hazardous materials, operations, and equipment. This document does not purport to address all of the safety problems associated with its use. It is the responsibility of whoever uses this document to consult and establish appropriate and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. Significance and Use This test method is designed to simulate extreme environmental conditions encountered on the outside of an automobile due to sunlight, heat, and to provide an acceleration of exposure for the purpose of predicting the performance of exterior automotive materials.
2014-05-20
Standard
J1531_201405
This procedure is used to determine seam strength and seam fatigue of automotive textiles, vinyl coated fabrics and related soft trim materials.
2014-05-20
WIP Standard
J1691
This SAE Recommended Practice is intended to cover plastic safety glazing for use in motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment. Nominal specifications for thickness, flatness, curvature, size, and fabrication details are presented principally for the guidance of body engineers and designers. For additional information on plastic safety glazing materials for use in motor vehicles and motor vehicle equipment, please see SAE J674.
2014-05-06
Event
2014-05-05
WIP Standard
AMS3255B
This specification establishes the requirements for an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (EPTFE) in the form of sealing tape requiring no curing.

This tape has been used typically for sealing aircraft access panels, pressure barriers, mold line surface close-out panels where gaskets are required, but usage is not limited to such applications. The tape is resistant to aircraft fuels, fluids an lubricants, and is capable of withstanding long-term exposure from -65 to +450 degrees F (-54 to +232 degress C) with short term exposures up to 6000 degrees F (315 degrees C).

2014-04-28
Technical Paper
2014-28-0010
Saral Bhanshali
Abstract This breakthrough development involves material conversion from aluminum die cast to polypropylene long fiber thermoplastic (40% long glass filled) for a two wheeler bracket of a leading automotive OEM. The plastic bracket was developed working in collaboration with the molder, glass supplier, technology collaborator and the OEM. The new part needed to be designed lighter in weight, easier to process and suitable for painting, outdoor exposure and stringent dynamic conditions. The scope of this study includes the evaluation of the new material from different viewpoints and comparison of the same with the existing material. The submission will go through the intricate analyses carried out in the development process and highlight the key advantages over aluminum. Studies will include static and dynamic analysis, fiber orientation studies, gate location studies, etc.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2731

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