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Viewing 1 to 30 of 14224
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8044
Guoyu FENG, Wenku Shi, Henghai Zhang, Qinghua Zu
In order to predict the fatigue life of heavy commercial vehicles thrust rod made of rubber material dumbbell specimens and uniaxial tensile fatigue tests. Based on the measured data samples to the maximum principal strain injury parameters established rubber uniaxial fatigue life prediction models. In the longitudinal tension and compression loading, fatigue life V rods were predicted, and by the uniaxial fatigue test verification, the results show that the maximum principal strain prediction model, the maximum error is less than 10% predicted better results. Show by dumbbell specimen data, the establishment of a spherical hinge rubber life prediction model method, it is possible to predict the fatigue life of the thrust rod.
2016-09-27
Technical Paper
2016-01-8027
Stefan Steidel, Thomas Halfmann, Manfred Baecker, Axel Gallrein
Rolling resistance and tread wear of tires do particularly influence the maintenance costs of commercial vehicles. Although the tire labeling is established in Europe, it is meanwhile well-known that, due to the respective test procedures, these labels do not hold in realistic application scenarios in the field. This circumstance arises from the development phase of tires, where the respective performance properties are mainly evaluated in tire/wheel standalone scenarios in which the wide range of usage variability of commercial vehicles cannot be considered adequately. Within this article we address a method to predict indicators for rolling resistance and tread wear of tires in realistic application scenarios considering application-based factors of influence like specific customers, operation circumstances, regional dependencies, fleet specific characteristics etc. Moreover, the prescribed methodology may also be transferred to the prediction of fuel consumption and emission.
2016-09-20
Technical Paper
2016-01-2022
Ajay Rao, Vivek Karan, Pradeep Kumar
Turbulence is by far the number one concern of anxious passengers and a cause for airline injuries. Apart from causing discomfort to passengers, it also results in unplanned downtime of aircrafts. Currently the Air Traffic Control (ATC) and the meteorological weather charts aid the pilot in devising flight paths that avoid turbulent regions. Even with such tailored flight paths, pilots report constant encounters with turbulence. Turbulence avoidance can be made much more accurate by the use of predictive models that exploit patterns found in historical and transactional data. This paper proposes the use of such predictive analysis algorithms on meteorological data over the geographical area where the flight is intended to fly.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1932
Niclas Strömberg
During several years a toolbox for performing virtual rig tests of a brake disc has been developed by the author. A thermo-flexible multi-body model of a test rig is derived and implemented. A thermo-mechanical model of the pad-disc system is formulated including thermo-elasticity, frictional contact and wear. The energy balance at the contact interface is governed by contact conductance that depends linearly on the contact pressure and the frictional heat depends on a temperature dependent coefficient of friction. Instead of adopting a standard Lagrangian approach, the disc is formulated in an Eulerian frame like a fluid. This is then coupled to the pad most accurately by using Signorini’s contact conditions, Coulomb’s law of friction and Archard’s law of wear. The numerical treatment of these laws are performed by applying an augmented Lagrangian formulation, which in turn is solved with a non-smooth Newton method.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1943
Tadayoshi Matsumori, Yoshitsugu Goto, Noboru Sugiura, Kenji Abe, Yoshihiro Osawa, Yosuke Akita, Satoshi Wakamatsu, Katsuya Okayama, Kyoko Kosaka
This paper deals with the friction coefficient COF variation in a disk brake system when the wear debris between the brake pad and the disc rotor contains water. In our previous study, it was experimentally found that little moisture content leads to high COF compared with COF under dry condition. Based on the results, we propose a hypothesis that agglomerates composed of the wet wear debris induce COF variation when the agglomerates stand at gaps between friction surfaces. In this paper, for supporting the hypothesis, firstly, testing the friction property of the wet wear debris, we confirm that capillary force affects COF variation. After that, using a particle-based simulation assuming firstly and secondary particles of wear debris, we simulate the wear debris behavior with or without the capillary force.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1912
Bo Hu, Sydney Luk, Peter Filip
Copper and copper alloys are widely used in friction materials such as brake pad formulations as one of key ingredients by providing good thermal conductivity and high temperature friction stability to achieve desired friction performance, fade and wear resistance. However, the use of copper or copper containing material is being restricted in brake pads due to environment and health concerns. Extensive works have been made to explore the copper substitutes but most of these efforts became ineffective and failed with issues either thermal fade or excessive pad/rotor wear. In this paper, friction and wear responses were examined when a metallic composite material was used as the copper substitute in NAO and Low-met brake formulations where the copper and copper alloys were added 8% and 22% respectively.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1915
Meechai Sriwiboon, Seong Rhee, Kritsana kaewlob, Nipon Tiempan, Rungrod Samankitesakul
Two formulations have been selected and tested for this investigation; Low-Copper NAO and Copper – Free NAO. Each formulation was processed to achieve 3 levels of porosity; 12, 17 and 22%. Each sample was tested for hardness (HRR, HRS, and HRL), natural frequencies and compressibility plus performance testing for friction, wear and brake squeal. This paper describes correlations or lack of them between all the measurements.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1957
Seonho Lee, Heejae Kang, Ohchul Kwon, Chirl Soo Shin
A trend in automotive parts development is the pursuit of long life, high quality and reliability. The increase in service life of automotive wheel bearings, by improving the rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of bearing steels, was investigated. Conventional studies of bearing steels and heat treatments have dealt with quenching and tempering (Q/T) in 52100 steel. This study is a new trial to increase the strength of bearing steels by special austempering in phases after general Q/T heat treatments.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1910
Philippe Dufrenoy
A methodology to identify the bulk properties of friction material from their formulation V. Magnier; I. Serrano; AL. Cristol ; P. Dufrénoy* University of Lille Cité scientifique Avenue Paul Langevin F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex * Corresponding author : philippe.dufrenoy@univ-lille1.fr Friction materials for braking applications are made of a high number of components leading to bulk properties which guarantee the performances. Development are mainly made by a trial-error methodology due to the misunderstanding of the relationship between formulation and process and properties. In this work we propose to identify this relationship by an experimental methodology combined with microstructural analysis. The first step is the description of the microstructure obtained by tomographic analysis leading to quantitative information about the morphology of the components, their distribution in the volume, orientations, etc.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1916
Raffaele Gilardi, Davide Sarocchi, Loredana Bounous
A wide range of different carbon powders is available and currently used in friction materials like coke, graphite and carbon black. The effect of the type of carbon on braking performance has been extensively investigated in the past and it has been demonstrated that graphite can play an important role in copper-free brake pads. However, there are no studies about the influence of carbon powders on the processability of brake pads. Brake pads need to be painted in order to avoid corrosion. Usually electrostatic painting is used on industrial scale, which requires the brake pads to be conductive. NAO brake pads (and especially Cu-free NAO brake pads) are rather insulating, and therefore difficult to paint. In this presentation we’ll show how special carbon powders can increase the electrical conductivity and therefore allow easy painting of brake pads. Based on these investigations, a new copper-free NAO formulation has been developed.
2016-09-18
Technical Paper
2016-01-1914
Pavlina Peikertova, Miroslava Kuricova, Alena Kazimirova, Jana Tulinska, Magdalena Barancokova, Aurelia Liskova, Marta Staruchova, Mira Horvathova, Silvia Ilavska, Eva Jahnova, Michaela Szabova, Miroslav Vaculik, Jana Kukutschova, Karla Kucova, Maria Dusinska, Peter Filip
Particulate air pollution from road traffic currently represents significant environmental and health issue. Attention is also paid to the “non-exhaust pollution sources,” which includes brake wear debris. During each brake application, the airborne and nonairborne particles are emitted into the environment due to wear. High temperatures and pressures on the friction surfaces initiate chemical and morphological changes of the initial components of brake pads and rotating counterparts. Understanding of impact of matter released from brakes on health is vital. Numerous studies clearly demonstrated that particulate matter caused potential adverse effects related to cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, stimulation of proinflammatory factors, and mutagenicity on the cellular level. This paper compiles our main results in the field of genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and aquatic toxicity of airborne brake wear particles.
2016-07-21
Standard
AMS4359
This specification covers an aluminum alloy in the form of extruded rods, bars, and profiles (shapes) 0.040 to 1.500 inches (1.02 to 38.10 mm), inclusive, in thickness, and produced with maximum cross sectional area of 23.25 in2 (15000 mm2) and a maximum circumscribing circle diameter (circle size) of 15.5 inches (394 mm) (see 8.4.1).
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/3C
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/1C
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/2C
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/12B
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/8C
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/5C
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/7C
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/15B
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/16B
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/18A
This specification covers one type of toughened, high-impact epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/13B
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/14B
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/17B
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
2016-07-18
WIP Standard
AMS3894/10B
This specification covers one type of epoxy-resin-impregnated carbon fibers in the form of tape and sheet.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 14224

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