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2016-12-05 ...
  • December 5-16, 2016 (6 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been used by engineers as a design tool in new product development since the early 1990's. Until recently, most FEA applications have been limited to static analysis due to the cost and complexity of advanced types of analyses. Progress in the commercial FEA software and in computing hardware has now made it practical to use advanced types as an everyday design tool of design engineers. In addition, competitive pressures and quality requirements demand a more in-depth understanding of product behavior under real life loading conditions.
2016-10-24
Event
This session sets out to reflect the recent advances on the research, development and practices of Powertrain NVH treatment. The technical papers are of interest to powertrain system designers, testing specialists, NVH experts, and other individuals who evaluate and develop technologies to control powertrain NVH. The coverage includes: engine, engine subsystem and components noise and vibration; powertrain systems noise measurement and instrumentation; powertrain systems noise analysis.
2016-09-30 ...
  • September 30, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Scottsdale, Arizona
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Brake noise is one of the highest ranked complaints of car owners. Grunts, groans, squeaks, and squeals are common descriptions of the annoying problem which brake engineers spend many hours trying to resolve. Consumer expectations and the high cost of warranty repairs are pushing the optimization of brake NVH performance. This course will provide you with an overview of the various damping mechanisms and tools for analyzing and reducing brake noise. A significant component of this course is the inclusion of case studies which will demonstrate how brake noise squeal issues have been successfully resolved.
2016-09-29 ...
  • September 29, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Scottsdale, Arizona
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Brake Noise, Vibration, and Harshness (NVH) is recognized as one of the major problems currently faced by the automotive manufacturers and their suppliers, with customers warranty claims of more than $100 million per year for each manufacturer. With increasing consumer braking performance expectations, automotive OEM’s and suppliers need the ability to predict potential problems and identify solutions during the design phase before millions of dollars have been spent in design, prototyping, and manufacturing tooling.
2016-09-19 ...
  • September 19-20, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Shanghai, China
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The sound package materials for vehicle noise control seminar provides a detail and thorough analysis of three different classes of acoustical materials – namely absorbers, barriers, and dampers, how they are different from each other, and acoustical properties that materials should possess for optimum vehicle noise control. The seminar addresses new advances in acoustical materials, primarily in absorption materials that impact the vehicle acoustics. The seminar covers ways to evaluate the acoustical performance of these materials using different test methods, including material, component, and vehicle level measurements.
2016-09-06 ...
  • September 6-15, 2016 (4 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This four-session web seminar provides a detailed understanding of the source – path-receiver relationship for developing appropriate sound package treatments in vehicles, including automobiles, commercial vehicles, and other transportation devices. The course provides a detailed overview of absorption, attenuation (barrier), and damping materials and how to evaluate their performances on material, component, and vehicle level applications. A significant part of this course is the case studies that demonstrate how properly designed sound package materials successfully address vehicle noise issues.
2016-08-02 ...
  • August 2-4, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This web seminar provides an in-depth overview of diesel engine noise including combustion and mechanical noise sources. In addition, the instructor will discuss a system approach to automotive integration including combining sub-systems and components to achieve overall vehicle noise and vibration goals.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1803
Hannes Frank, Claus-Dieter Munz
Avoiding narrowband components in the acoustic spectrum is one of the most critical objectives in the automotive aeroacoustic optimization process. The underlying physical mechanisms are not completely understood. In a preceding numerical and experimental investigation, we performed large eddy simulations of an early-development stage realistic side-view mirror, where tonal noise was captured and the principle mechanisms were identified. In this contribution, we present simulations on a simplified two-dimensional geometry that is based on these findings. It is shown that the basic flow topology relevant for tonal noise generation on the original side-view mirror as well as the tonal noise source is reproduced in the 2D case. Furthermore, we present comparisons with measurements and the necessity and influence of a splitter plate downstream of the 2D body to avoid large scale vortex shedding.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1805
Florian Zenger, Clemens Junger, Manfred Kaltenbacher, Stefan Becker
Abstract A low pressure axial fan for benchmarking numerical methods in the field of aerodynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The generic fan for this benchmark is a typical fan to be used in commercial applications. The design procedure was according to the blade element theory for low solidity fans. A wide range of experimental data is available, including aerodynamic performance of the fan (fan characteristic curve), fluid mechanical quantities on the pressure and suction side from laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements, wall pressure fluctuations in the gap region and sound characteristics on the suction side from sound power and microphone array measurements. The experimental setups are described in detail, as to ease reproducibility of measurement positions. This offers the opportunity of validating aerodynamic and aeroacoustic quantities, obtained from different numerical tools and procedures.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1832
Ramakrishna Kamath
Intermediate shaft assembly is used to connect steering gear to the steering wheel. The primary function of the intermediate shaft is to transfer torsional loads. There is a high probability of noise propagating through the Intermediate shaft to the driver. The current standard for measuring the noise is by performing vehicle level subjective evaluations. If improperly clamped at either of the yokes, a sudden change in the direction of the torsional load on the Intermediate shaft can generate a displeasing noise. Noise can also be generated from the constant velocity joint. Intermediate shaft noise can be measured using a microphone or can be correlated to acceleration values. The benefit of measuring the acceleration over sound pressure level is the reduction of complexity of the test environment and test set up. The nature of the noise in question requires the filtering of low frequency data. This paper presents a new test procedure that has been developed by General Motors.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1807
Olga Roditcheva, Lennart Carl Lofdahl, Simone Sebben, Pär Harling cEng, Holger Bernhardsson
Abstract This paper presents an experimental study of aeroacoustical sound sources generated by the turbulent flow around the side mirror of a Volvo V70. Measurements were carried out at the Volvo Cars aerodynamical wind tunnel (PVT) and at the aeroacoustical wind tunnel of Stuttgart University (FKFS). Several different measurement techniques were applied in both tunnels and the results were compared to each other. The configurations considered here were: side mirror with a cord and without the cord. The results discussed in this paper include intensity probe measurements in the flow around the side mirror, sound source localization with beamforming technique using a three-dimensional spherical array as well as standard measurements inside the car with an artificial head. This experimental study focused on understanding the differences between testing at the PVT and FKFS.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1810
Marie Escouflaire, Nicolas Zerbib, David Mas, Nicolas Papaxanthos, Saad Bennouna, Emmanuel Perrey-Debain, Boureima Ouedraogo, Solène Moreau, Jean Michel Ville
Abstract In the framework of noise reduction of HVAC (Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning) systems designed for cars, the present study deals with the numerical prediction of aeroacoustics phenomena encountered inside such devices for industrial purposes, i.e. with a reasonable CPU time. It is then proposed in this paper to assess the validity of the chaining, via Lighthill-Curle analogy, of a DES (Detached Eddy Simulation) resulting from the CFD code OpenFOAM (ESI Group) versus a RANS-LES (Large Eddy Simulation) and a BEM calculation resulting from the Vibro/Aeroacoustics software VA One (ESI Group) on an academic case of air passing through a rectangular diaphragm at a low Mach number. The BEM code being parallelized, the performances of DMP (Distributed Memory Processing) solution will also be assessed.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1809
Alexander Schell, Vincent Cotoni
Abstract Prediction of flow induced noise in the interior of a passenger car requires accurate representations of both fluctuating surface pressures across the exterior of the vehicle and efficient models of the vibro-acoustic transmission of these surface pressures to the driver’s ear. In this paper, aeroacoustic and vibro-acoustic methods are combined in order to perform an aero-vibro-acoustic analysis of a Mercedes-Benz A-class. The exterior aero-acoustic method consists of a time domain incompressible Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) and an acoustic wave equation. The method is extended in this paper to account for convection effects when modelling the exterior sound propagation. The interior vibro-acoustic model consists of a frequency domain Finite Element (FE) model of the side glass combined with a generalized Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) model of the interior cabin.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1812
Saad Bennouna, Solène Moreau, Jean Michel Ville, Olivier Cheriaux
Abstract The noise radiated inside the car cabin depends on many sources such as the embedded equipments like the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) module. An HVAC is a compact and complex system composed of several elements: blower, flaps, thermal exchangers, ducts… Air provided by an HVAC is blown by a blower passing through different components and then distributed to car cabin areas. Interactions between airflow and the HVAC fixed components generate noises that emerge in the car cabin. CEVAS project, managed by the automotive equipment manufacturer Valeo, is aiming to develop a prediction tool which will provide HVAC noise spectrum and sound quality data. The tool is based, in particular, on aeroacoustic characterization of individual elements and associations of elements.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1811
Anders Rynell, Gunilla Efraimsson, Mattias Chevalier, Mats Abom
Abstract To obtain realistic noise characteristics from CAA studies of subsonic fans, it is important to prescribe properly constructed turbulent inflow statistics. This is frequently omitted; instead it is assumed that the stochastic characteristics of turbulence, absent at the initial stage, progressively develops as the rotor inflicts the flow field over time and hence that the sound generating mechanism governed by surface pressure fluctuations are asymptotically accounted for. That assumption violates the actual interplay taking place between an ingested flow field and the surface pressure fluctuations exerted by the blades producing noise. The aim of the present study is to examine the coupling effect between synthetically ingested turbulence to sound produced from a subsonic ducted fan. The steady state inflow parameters are mapped from a precursor RANS simulation onto the inflow boundaries of a reduced domain to limit the computational cost.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1814
Maxime Legros, Jean Michel Ville, Solène Moreau, Xavier Carniel, Christophe Lambourg, Guillaume Stempfel
Abstract The new requirements during the first stages of the conception of a HVAC prompt the designer to integrate the acoustic problematic increasingly upstream. The designer needs to select a coherent components’ choice in order to comply with the specifications in terms of aeraulic and acoustic performances. A tool has been created to guide the designer’s choices based on an acoustic synthesis which is a design and/or diagnosis approach used to analyze and predict the acoustic behavior of a complex system. The synthesis is developed in order to propose an approach which considers the integration effects and some interaction effects. The acoustic synthesis results are the starting point of a psycho-acoustic study providing audio samples of the prediction and indications of the HVAC acceptance by the prospective user. Also, one may compare the results of different acoustic synthesis projects to study the influence of the parameters on the acoustic prediction.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1813
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza
Abstract The characteristics of the intake system affect both engine power output and gas-dynamic noise emissions. The latter is particularly true in downsized VVA engines, where a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves is realized, due to the intake line de-throttling at part-load. For this engine architecture, a refined air-box design is hence requested. In this work, the Transmission Loss (TL) of the intake air-box of a commercial VVA engine is numerically computed through a 3D FEM approach. Results are compared with experimental data, showing a very good correlation. The validated model is then coupled to an external optimizer (ModeFRONTIERTM) to increase the TL parameter in a prefixed frequency range. The improvement of the acoustic attenuation is attained through a shape deformation of the inner structure of the base device, taking into account constraints related to the device installation inside the engine bay.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1817
Juergen Veit, Paco Langjahr, Stephan Brandl, Bernhard Graf
Abstract Due to more challenging future emission legislations and the trend towards downsizing, the number of turbocharged (TC) engines, especially petrol engines, is steadily increasing. The usage of TC has high risk to cause different noise phenomena apparent in the vehicle interior which are often perceived as annoying for the passengers. In order to further improve consideration of TC topics in the development, objective judgment and monitoring of TC noise issues is of high importance. Therefore, objective parameters and corresponding tools that are especially focusing on TC noise phenomena have to be developed. One main target of these tools is to deliver an objective TC assessment in an efficient way and with minimum additional effort. Application of the criteria presented in this publication therefore allows acoustic engineers to judge the NVH behavior and annoyance of the TC with respect to its vehicle interior noise contribution.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1816
Heiki Tiikoja, Fabio Auriemma, Jüri Lavrentjev
Abstract In this paper the propagation of acoustic plane waves in turbulent, fully developed flow is studied by means of an experimental investigation carried out in a straight, smooth-walled duct. The presence of a coherent perturbation, such as an acoustic wave in a turbulent confined flow, generates the oscillation of the wall shear stress. In this circumstance a shear wave is excited and superimposed on the sound wave. The turbulent shear stress is modulated by the shear wave and the wall shear stress is strongly affected by the turbulence. From the experimental point of view, it results in a measured damping strictly connected to the ratio between the thickness of the acoustic sublayer, which is frequency dependent, and the thickness of the viscous sublayer of the turbulent mean flow, the last one being dependent on the Mach number. By reducing the turbulence, the viscous sublayer thickness increases and the wave propagation is mainly dominated by convective effects.
2016-06-15
Journal Article
2016-01-1819
Antonio J. Torregrosa, Alberto Broatch, Vincent Raimbault, Jerome Migaud
Abstract Intake noise has become one the main concerns in the design of highly-supercharged downsized engines, which are expected to play a significant role in the upcoming years. Apart from the low frequencies associated with engine breathing, in these engines other frequency bands are also relevant which are related to the turbocharger operation, and which may radiate from the high-pressure side from the compressor outlet to the charge air cooler. Medium frequencies may be controlled with the use of different typologies of resonators, but these are not so effective for relatively high frequencies. In this paper, the potential of the use of multi-layer porous materials to control those high frequencies is explored. The material sheets are located in the side chamber of an otherwise conventional resonator, thus providing a compact, lightweight and convenient arrangement.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1818
Raimo Kabral, Lin Du, Mats Abom, Magnus Knutsson
Abstract The concept of IC engine downsizing is a well-adapted industry standard, enabling better fuel conversion efficiency and the reduction of tailpipe emissions. This is achieved by utilizing different type of superchargers. As a consequence, the additional charger noise emission, at the IC engine inlet, can become a problem. In order to address such problem, the authors of this work have recently proposed a novel dissipative silencer for effective and robust noise control of the compressor. Essentially, it realizes an optimal flow channel impedance, referred to as the Cremer impedance. This is achieved by means of a straight flow channel with a locally reacting wall consisting of air cavities covered by an acoustic resistance, e.g., a micro-perforated panel (MPP). In this paper, an improved optimization method of this silencer is presented. The classical Cremer impedance model is modified to account for mean flow dependence of the optimal wave number.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1822
Drasko Masovic, Franz Zotter, Eugene Nijman, Jan Rejlek, Robert Höldrich
Abstract Radiation of sound from an open pipe with a hot mean flow presents one of the classic problems of acoustics in inhomogeneous media. The problem has been especially brought into focus in the last several decades, in the context of noise control of vehicle exhaust systems and jet engines. However, the reports on the measurements of the radiated sound field are still rare and scattered over different values of subsonic and supersonic flow speeds, cold and hot jets, as well as different sound frequency ranges. This paper focuses on low Mach number values of the mean flow speed and low frequencies of the incident (plane) sound waves inside an unflanged cylindrical pipe with a straight cut. It presents the results of the far-field radiation pattern measurements and compares them with an existing analytical model from the literature. The mean flow inside the pipe reached Mach number values up to 0.25 and temperature up to 300°C.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1823
Andrea Grosso, Martin Lohrmann
Abstract Operational Transfer Path Analysis (OTPA) assess the possible ways of energy to transfer from the various sources of excitation to a given target location. Applied to vehicle engineering, the OTPA provides indication about dominant sources and path contributions. However, it can only analyze the actual system under test and cannot predict if an improvement can be achieved by applying a counter measure. A careful interpretation of the measurement results is therefore necessary in order to define an effective engineering solution strategy. In this paper the RMA (Response Modification Analysis) technique is used to facilitate a sensitivity analysis, gaining insight whether energy is likely to be rerouted. This gives additional understanding of OTPA results, indicating which counter measure is most effective. The RMA is applied to a real measurement scenario, showing the advantage of the combination of OTPA with RMA for correctly identifying the relevant sources and paths.
2016-06-15
Technical Paper
2016-01-1820
Mikael Karlsson, Magnus Knutsson, Mats Abom
Abstract This work explores how fluid driven whistles in complex automotive intake and exhaust systems can be predicted using computationally affordable tools. Whistles associated with unsteady shear layers (created over for example side branches or perforates in resonators) are studied using vortex sound theory; vorticity in the shear layer interacts with the acoustic field while being convected across the orifice. If the travel time of a hydrodynamic disturbance over the orifice reasonably matches a multiple of the acoustic period of an acoustic feedback system, energy is transferred from the flow field to the acoustic field resulting in a whistle. The actual amplitude of the whistle is set by non-linear saturation phenomena and cannot be predicted here, but the frequency and relative strength can be found. For this not only the mean flow and acoustic fields needs to be characterized separately, but also the interaction of the two.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 9452

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