Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 7356
2015-08-04 ...
  • August 4-6, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This web seminar provides an in-depth overview of diesel engine noise including combustion and mechanical noise sources. In addition, the instructor will discuss a system approach to automotive integration including combining sub-systems and components to achieve overall vehicle noise and vibration goals.
2015-06-26 ...
  • June 26, 2015 (12:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Grand Rapids, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Most muffler design in the automotive industry is accomplished by using "cut-and-try" methods that rely on what has worked in the past and/or extensive full-scale testing on engines for validation. New computer software aimed at muffler design can shorten the design cycle and yield more effective results. This four hour seminar provides an introduction to the behavior of mufflers and silencers including a description of the two-port approach to muffler design. This seminar covers the acoustic simulation of muffler and silencer systems and the use of experimental methods to measure muffler performance.
2015-06-26 ...
  • June 26, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Grand Rapids, Michigan
  • October 9, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Charleston, South Carolina
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Brake noise is one of the highest ranked complaints of car owners. Grunts, groans, squeaks, and squeals are common descriptions of the annoying problem which brake engineers spend many hours trying to resolve. Consumer expectations and the high cost of warranty repairs are pushing the optimization of brake NVH performance. This course will provide you with an overview of the various damping mechanisms and tools for analyzing and reducing brake noise. A significant component of this course is the inclusion of case studies which will demonstrate how brake noise squeal issues have been successfully resolved.
2015-06-25 ...
  • June 25-26, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Grand Rapids, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
***Please note: The Thursday, June 25, 2015 seminar class time is 10:30am - 6:00pm. The sound package materials for vehicle noise control seminar provides a detail and thorough analysis of three different classes of acoustical materials – namely absorbers, barriers, and dampers, how they are different from each other, and acoustical properties that materials should possess for optimum vehicle noise control. The seminar addresses new advances in acoustical materials, primarily in absorption materials that impact the vehicle acoustics.
2015-06-22
Event
This session is to present numerical and experimental work pertaining to noise due to flow around the vehicle body, such as flow-induced interior noise, flow over protrusions, sunroofs, windows, noise from ventilation systems, or flow noise in exhaust system. Papers on aerodynamics alone without sound are excluded. Numerical studies may include new models or models based on existing theory as long as they are adequately supported by experimental or theoretical verifications.
2015-06-22
Event
This session covers noise sources, measurement techniques, noise attenuation strategies, case studies, prediction and modeling methods, and community regulations related to drive-by noise.
2015-06-22
Event
This session covers noise and vibration sources and paths within a vehicle (automobiles, trucks and recreational vehicles). Example of noise sources included are HVAC system, electric motor powered mechanisms and door closure and example of vibration sources are road and engine. Also included are Whole Body and Hand Arm Vibration experienced by professional drivers as well as acoustical design factors of audio, infotainment, and hands free devices.
2015-06-22
Event
This session is focused on the vehicle body interior noise issues caused by friction and/or impact due to the vibration of interfacing components. The papers in this session will investigate those issues through the best practice of analytical and experimental applications.
2015-06-22
Event
This session addresses the strategies and methods for implementing active noise and vibration control in a vehicle. It will cover sensors and transducers, feedback systems, control algorithms, software for active control, noise and vibration cancellation devices, noise and vibration measurement systems, and case studies.
2015-04-21
Event
This session sets out to reflect the recent advances on the research, development and practices of Powertrain NVH treatment. The technical papers are of interest to powertrain system designers, testing specialists, NVH experts, and other individuals who evaluate and develop technologies to control powertrain NVH. The coverage includes: engine, engine subsystem and components noise and vibration; powertrain systems noise measurement and instrumentation; powertrain systems noise analysis.
2015-03-17 ...
  • March 17-26, 2015 (4 Sessions) - Live Online
  • September 15-24, 2015 (4 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This four-session web seminar provides a detailed understanding of the source – path-receiver relationship for developing appropriate sound package treatments in vehicles, including automobiles, commercial vehicles, and other transportation devices. The course provides a detailed overview of absorption, attenuation (barrier), and damping materials and how to evaluate their performances on material, component, and vehicle level applications. A significant part of this course is the case studies that demonstrate how properly designed sound package materials successfully address vehicle noise issues.
2015-01-14
Technical Paper
2015-26-0129
Kapil Gupta, Vikram MR, Eugenio Manta
ABSTRACT A turbocharger unit mainly consists of a centrifugal compressor and a turbine coupled together by a solid shaft. This is employed to boost the charge air pressure of engine. Turbocharging in modern diesel and gasoline engines have become a common and essential operation to result higher power outputs, lower emissions, improved efficiency and refinements from a similar capacity of naturally aspirated engine. The automotive turbocharger system is a source of synchronous and asynchronous noises which are particularly very disturbing for the passengers. This need to be eliminated or reduced for passenger comfort. Subjectively, a high whistle noise was audible at passenger cabin during in mid-rpm range drive in all gears in a 4 cylinder diesel vehicle. Objective noise and vibration data confirm the issue as unbalance whistle.
2014-11-23
WIP Standard
AS8040C
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) covers combustion heaters used in the following applications: a. Cabin heating (all occupied regions and windshield heating) b. Wing and empennage anti-icing c. Engine and accessory heating (when heater is installed as part of the aircraft) d. Aircraft de-icing
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0121
Kazuhiko Tanaka, Haruomi Sugita, Hibiki Saito, Masahiko Sekita
Abstract Recently, it has been widely practiced in motorcycle developments that the same type of engine is commonly applied to various vehicle categories. Accordingly, it is drawing more attention to develop the methodology for creating the best suitable sound for each individual vehicle category regardless of restriction from the engine configurations. In our study, we aimed to establish a procedure to control exhaust sounds beyond the borders across the inherent sound qualities originated from their engine configurations. Firstly, we conducted subjective tests in order to extract essential factors, depicted by adjectives that appear in verbal expressions commonly used to illustrate sound qualities in general. The results enabled us to conduct quantitative evaluations of the exhaust sound qualities of various motorcycles. Next, we clarified the relationships among the individual factors of sound qualities under our study and physical parameters in waveforms of the sounds.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0120
Sara Gronchi, Riccardo Maccherini, Raffaele Squarcini, Fabio Guglielmo, Emanuela Ligarò
Abstract In the modern engine of both small and large size, the acoustic emission is a very important matter increasingly studied as per specific international standards. This paper presents the study of the acoustic emission of a hydraulic rotary oil pump by means of measurement techniques and numerical approaches. This activity aims at showing a complete test-case in which both methods are used to face a noise issue and highlighting also the “weight” of the hydraulic excitation in both cases. In particular, an oil pump has been completely characterized on a test bench to verify the hydraulic performances and the noise radiation. A structural modification has been suggested with the target of altering the noise spectrum of the pump, achieving an optimization of the noise generation. From this assumption, experimental and numerical activities have started in parallel.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0129
Giancarlo Chiatti, Erasmo Recco, Ornella Chiavola, Silvia Conforto
Abstract In the last years, the increasing concern for the environmental issues of IC engines has promoted the development of new strategies capable of reducing both pollutant emissions in atmosphere and noise radiation. Engines can produce different types of noise: 1) aerodynamic noise due to intake and exhaust systems and 2) surface radiated noise. Identification and analysis of noise sources are essential to evaluate the individual contribution (injection, combustion, piston slap, turbocharger, oil pump, valves) to the overall noise with the aim of selecting appropriate control strategies. Previous paper focused on the combustion related noise emission. The research activity aimed at diagnosing and controlling the combustion process via acoustic measurements. The optimal placement of the microphone was selected, where the signal was strongly correlated to the in-cylinder pressure development during the combustion process.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0119
Diego Copiello, Ze Zhou, Gregory Lielens
Abstract This paper addresses the numerical simulation of motorcycle exhaust system noise using a transfer matrix method (TMM) supporting high order analytical acoustic modes representation combined with finite element method (FEM) included in the Actran software, R15. In the state-of-the-art of hybrid TMM/FEM approach the main assumption consists in a 1D plane wave acoustic propagation in the components connections which is intrinsically limiting the maximum frequency of the analysis. In motorcycle exhaust systems this limitation is even stronger because typical geometries exhibit strong curvatures and bends causing the scattering of the acoustic wave into higher order modes. Therefore, results might be erroneous even at frequencies at which only the plane wave is expected to be propagating. The improved transfer matrix method presented in this paper overcomes this limitation allowing to increase the range of applicability of this method.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0105
Atsushi Maruyama, Gaku Naoe
Abstract For a small general purpose engine, the authors have studied on “combustion noise”, the mechanical noise originating from combustion. The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanisms of combustion noise generation. The engine used in this study was a 4-stroke air-cooled single-cylinder engine with the typical characteristics of 3.5 kW-class small general purpose engines, which was specifically designed for experiments. We analyzed the operational behaviors of parts such as the crankshaft, the flywheel and the crankcase during the time of occurrence of combustion noise. Results of the analysis showed that the primary component of combustion noise in small general purpose engines is radiated from the flywheel connected to the crankshaft, and that the vibration mode that radiates the noise is excited by bending deformation of the crankshaft under explosion load.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0132
Hiroki Ikeda, Norimasa Iida, Hiroshi Kuzuyama, Tsutomu Umehara, Takayuki Fuyuto
Abstract A combustion method called Noise Canceling Spike (NC-Spike) Combustion [1, 2] has been reported in the co-author's previous paper, which reduces combustion noise in PCCI with split injection. This NC-Spike Combustion uses interference of the following “spike” of pressure rise on the preceding peak of pressure rise. The overall combustion noise is reduced by lowering the maximum frequency component of the noise spectrum. The period of this frequency is two times of the time interval between the two peaks of the pressure rise rate. This maximum load range of conventional PCCI combustion is limited by the combustion noise, since the maximum pressure rise rate increases as the amount of injected fuel increases. The NC-Spike Combustion has a potential to extend of the operating range of PCCI combustion.
2014-10-31
WIP Standard
MA3433A
No scope available.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2676
Takayuki Fuyuto, Masahiro Taki, Reiko Ueda, Yoshiaki Hattori, Hiroshi Kuzuyama, Tsutomu Umehara
Abstract An author's previous studies addressed a combustion system which reduces emissions, noise, and fuel consumption by using PCCI with the split injection of fuel. This concept relies on the premixed combustion of the first injected fuel and accelerated oxidation by the second injected fuel. Although this combustion system requires the optimization of the timing of the second injection, the details of how noise and emissions are reduced have not been elucidated. In this paper, the authors explain the mechanism whereby emissions and noise are reduced by the second injection. In-cylinder visualizations and numerical simulations both showed an increase in smoke and CO as the second injection timing was advanced, as induced by the inhibited oxidation of the rich flame. When the second injection timing is excessively retarded, the amount of soot forming around the near-nozzle increased.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2863
Jouji Kimura, Shinichiro Kobayashi, Katsuhiro Hoshina, Kousuke Kawase, Koji Matsui, Atsushi Yamamoto
Abstract This paper describes the characteristics and mechanism of crankshaft impact noise that radiates from the cylinder body at full load medium engine speeds, based on the mechanism for axial vibration of crankshaft coupled with torsional vibration of crankshaft.
2014-10-13
Journal Article
2014-01-2864
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza, Luigi Teodosio, Vincenzo De Bellis
This paper reports 1D and 3D CFD analyses aiming to improve the gas-dynamic noise emission of a downsized turbocharged VVA engine through the re-design of the intake air-box device, consisting in the introduction of external or internal resonators. Nowadays, modern spark-ignition (SI) engines show more and more complex architectures that, while improving the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), may be responsible for the increased noise radiation at the engine intake mouth. In particular VVA systems allow for the actuation of advanced valve strategies that provide a reduction in the BSFC at part load operations thanks to the intake line de-throttling. In these conditions, due to a less effective attenuation of the pressure waves that travel along the intake system, VVA engines produce higher gas-dynamic noise levels.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 7356

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: