Criteria

Text:
Topic:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 7320
Training / Education
2015-08-04
This web seminar provides an in-depth overview of diesel engine noise including combustion and mechanical noise sources. In addition, the instructor will discuss a system approach to automotive integration including combining sub-systems and components to achieve overall vehicle noise and vibration goals.
Training / Education
2015-06-26
Most muffler design in the automotive industry is accomplished by using "cut-and-try" methods that rely on what has worked in the past and/or extensive full-scale testing on engines for validation. New computer software aimed at muffler design can shorten the design cycle and yield more effective results. This four hour seminar provides an introduction to the behavior of mufflers and silencers including a description of the two-port approach to muffler design. This seminar covers the acoustic simulation of muffler and silencer systems and the use of experimental methods to measure muffler performance.
Training / Education
2015-06-25
The sound package materials for vehicle noise control seminar provides a detail and thorough analysis of three different classes of acoustical materials – namely absorbers, barriers, and dampers, how they are different from each other, and acoustical properties that materials should possess for optimum vehicle noise control. The seminar addresses new advances in acoustical materials, primarily in absorption materials that impact the vehicle acoustics. The seminar covers ways to evaluate the acoustical performance of these materials using different test methods, including material, component, and vehicle level measurements.
Event
2015-06-22
This session addresses the strategies and methods for implementing active noise and vibration control in a vehicle. It will cover sensors and transducers, feedback systems, control algorithms, software for active control, noise and vibration cancellation devices, noise and vibration measurement systems, and case studies.
Event
2015-06-22
This session covers noise and vibration sources and paths within a vehicle (automobiles, trucks and recreational vehicles). Example of noise sources included are HVAC system, electric motor powered mechanisms and door closure and example of vibration sources are road and engine. Also included are Whole Body and Hand Arm Vibration experienced by professional drivers as well as acoustical design factors of audio, infotainment, and hands free devices.
Event
2015-06-22
This session is focused on the vehicle body interior noise issues caused by friction and/or impact due to the vibration of interfacing components. The papers in this session will investigate those issues through the best practice of analytical and experimental applications.
Event
2015-06-22
This session is to present numerical and experimental work pertaining to noise due to flow around the vehicle body, such as flow-induced interior noise, flow over protrusions, sunroofs, windows, noise from ventilation systems, or flow noise in exhaust system. Papers on aerodynamics alone without sound are excluded. Numerical studies may include new models or models based on existing theory as long as they are adequately supported by experimental or theoretical verifications.
Event
2015-06-22
This session covers noise sources, measurement techniques, noise attenuation strategies, case studies, prediction and modeling methods, and community regulations related to drive-by noise.
Training / Education
2014-10-27
This Engineering Academy covers a variety of vehicle noise control engineering principles and practice. Two specialty tracks are available: Vehicle Interior Noise and Powertrain Noise. While the Powertrain Noise track focuses on NVH issues generated by powertrain noise sources and the design strategies to minimize them, the Vehicle Interior Noise track focuses on the understanding and application of acoustical materials to optimize NVH in the passenger or operator compartment of a vehicle. Considerable attention is given to current measurement and instrumentation technologies and their effective use.
Training / Education
2014-10-27
This Engineering Academy covers a variety of vehicle noise control engineering principles and practice. Two specialty tracks are available: Vehicle Interior Noise and Powertrain Noise. While the Vehicle Interior Noise track focuses on the understanding and application of acoustical materials to optimize NVH in the passenger or operator compartment of a vehicle, the Powertrain Noise track focuses on NVH issues generated by powertrain noise sources and the design strategies to minimize them. Noise sources include engines, transmissions/transfer cases, accessories, exhaust, gears, axles, joints, and couplings.
Training / Education
2014-10-10
Brake noise is one of the highest ranked complaints of car owners. Grunts, groans, squeaks, and squeals are common descriptions of the annoying problem which brake engineers spend many hours trying to resolve. Consumer expectations and the high cost of warranty repairs are pushing the optimization of brake NVH performance. This course will provide you with an overview of the various damping mechanisms and tools for analyzing and reducing brake noise. A significant component of this course is the inclusion of case studies which will demonstrate how brake noise squeal issues have been successfully resolved.
Training / Education
2014-09-10
This four-session web seminar provides a detailed understanding of the source – path-receiver relationship for developing appropriate sound package treatments in vehicles, including automobiles, commercial vehicles, and other transportation devices. The course provides a detailed overview of absorption, attenuation (barrier), and damping materials and how to evaluate their performances on material, component, and vehicle level applications. A significant part of this course is the case studies that demonstrate how properly designed sound package materials successfully address vehicle noise issues.
Standard
2014-08-13
Various SAE vehicle sound level measurement procedures require use of a sound level meter which meets the Type 1 or Type 2 requirements of ANSI S1.4-1983 (see 2.1.1.1), or an alternative system which can be proved to provide equivalent test data. The purpose of this SAE Recommended Practice is to provide a procedure for determining if a sound data acquisition system (SDAS) has electro-acoustical performance equivalent to such a meter. By assuring equivalent performance of the test instrumentation, the equivalence of test data is assured. Two general configurations of sound data acquisition systems will be encompassed (see Figure 1). The first configuration consists of instrument sections which perform as a sound level meter. The second configuration is a system which records data for later processing. The intent of this document is to establish guidelines which permit the test engineer to insure equivalence of sound data acquisition systems to a sound level meter. It requires that the test engineer have a working knowledge of the characteristics of the sound data being measured.
Magazine
2014-07-10
Off-highway engines advance beyond Tier 4 With Tier 4 Final/Stage IV needs met, engine OEMs direct their focus and competitive energies toward optimizing competitive solutions. At the same time, they need to keep a weather eye out for future regulations, which many expect. Autonomous vehicle challenges span many fields Many of the challenges faced by military and commercial design teams are similar. Racket busters With a quiet cab at the top of many tractor buyers' wish lists, agricultural equipment manufacturers are pursuing every opportunity possible to shed decibels.
Standard
2014-07-01
This SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) provides Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) protection considerations for environmental control system (ECS) design. It is intended to familiarize the ECS designer with the subject in order to know what information will be required to do an ECS design where NBC protection is a requirement. This is not intended to be a thorough discussion of NBC protection. Such a document would be large and would be classified. Topics of NBC protection that are more pertinent to the ECS designer are discussed in more detail. Those of peripheral interest, but of which the ECS designer should be aware are briefly discussed. Only radiological aspects of nuclear blast are discussed. The term CBR (Chemical, Biological, and Radiological) has been used to contrast with NBC to indicate that only the radiological aspects of a nuclear blast are being discussed. This is actually a more accurate term to describe the subject of this paper, but NBC has become more widely used in the aircraft industry.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Bryce Gardner, Tiago Macarios
Abstract Speech transmissibility is a critical factor in the design of public address systems for passenger cabins in trains, aircraft and coaches. Speech transmissibility is primarily affected by the direct field, early low order reflections, and late reflections (reverberation) of the source. The direct and low order reflections are affected by the relative location of speakers and seats as well as the acoustic properties of the reflecting walls. To properly capture these early reflections, measures of speech transmissibility typically require time domain information. However, another important factor for speech transmissibility is background noise due to broadband exterior sources such as a flow noise sources. The background noise is typically modeled with broadband steady state assumptions such as in statistical energy analysis (SEA). This works presents an efficient method for predicting speech transmissiblity by combining ray tracing with SEA. In this method, the direct field and low order reflections are modelled using raytracing, while the reverberant field and background noise are modelled using SEA.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Yong Che
Abstract As motor assembly of Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) replaces engine system of Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicle, interior structure-borne noise induced by road random excitation becomes more prominent under middle and high speed. The research is focused on central driving type BEV. In order to improve interior noise in middle and low frequency range, dynamic load of BEV body must be identified. Consequently the structural noise induced by road excitation is conducted. The limitations of common identification method for dynamic body load are analyzed. The applied several identification methods are proposed for deterministic dynamic load such as engine or motor. Random dynamic load generated by road excitation is different from deterministic dynamic load. The deterministic load identification method cannot be applied to the random load directly. An identification method of dynamic body load for BEV is presented based on power spectrum decomposition. The procedure of BEV body load identification is described.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Hiromichi Tsuji, Satoshi Takabayashi, Eiji Takahashi, Hitoshi Murakami, Shinichi Maruyama
A finite element (FE) model of vibro-acoustic coupling analysis, such as a vehicle noise and vibration, is utilized for the improvement of the performance in the vehicle development phase. However, the accuracy of the analysis is not enough for substituting a prototype phase with a digital phase in the product development phases. Therefore, conducting the experiments with the prototype vehicle or the existed production vehicle is still very important for the performance evaluation and the model validation. The vehicle noise transfer function of the road noise performance cannot be evaluated with the existed excitation equipment, such as the 3 or 6 directional electromagnetic shaker. Therefore, this paper proposes new experimental method to measure the road noise vehicle transfer function. This method is based on the reciprocity between the tire contact patch and the driver's ear location. The reaction force sensor of the tire contact patch is newly developed for the reciprocal loud speaker excitation at the passenger ear location.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Barbara Neuhierl, David Schroeck, Sivapalan Senthooran, Philippe Moron
Abstract This paper presents an approach to numerically simulate greenhouse windnoise. The term “greenhouse windnoise” here describes the sound transferred to the interior through the glass panels of a series vehicle. Different panels, e.g. the windshield or sideglass, are contributing to the overall noise level. Attached parts as mirrors or wipers are affecting the flow around the vehicle and thus the pressure fluctuations which are acting as loads onto the panels. Especially the wiper influence and the effect of different wiper positions onto the windshield contribution is examined and set in context with the overall noise levels and other contributors. In addition, the effect of different flow yaw angles on the windnoise level in general and the wiper contributions in particular are demonstrated. As computational aeroacoustics requires accurate, highly resolved simulation of transient and compressible flow, a Lattice-Boltzmann approach is used. The noise transmission through the interior is then modeled by statistical energy analysis (SEA), representing the vehicle cabin and the panels excited by the flow.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Xiaohong Kuang, Jian Pang, Haiyan Zhang, Liang Yang, Jiang-hua FU
Abstract The paper describes the identification and control methods of turbocharger surge noise. Some parameters, such as temperature, flow quantity, pressure, vibration, turbocharger rpm and noise, are provided to identify surge noise. The advantages and disadvantages for each parameter are analyzed. The paper identifies that some special vehicle interior noise is contributed by turbocharger surge noise by using correlation analysis of the turbocharger inlet temperature, outlet pressure and vehicle internal noise. Spectral filtration analysis shows that the surge noise frequency components are above 1000Hz with wide frequency band. Quarter wave tuner's effective frequency range is found to be consistent with the surge noise frequency band. A panfluter-resonator which is a combination of several special quarter wave tuners is invented to diminish the wide band high frequency noise. After the panfluter-resonator is installed on a turbocharger system, the vehicle interior surge noise is significantly reduced.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Alessandro Zanon, Michele De Gennaro, Helmut Kuehnelt, Domenico Caridi, Daniel Langmayr
Abstract In hybrid and electrical vehicles new challenges in meeting the drivers' expectation with regards to acoustic comfort arise. The absence of the internal combustion engine noise enhances the passengers' perception of other noise sources, such as the Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system. Therefore efficient and reliable numerical models able to predict flow-induced broadband noise have become a major research topic in automotive industry. In this framework, the Zonal LES coupled with the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings (FWH) acoustic analogy are capable to simulate broadband noise from low speed axial fan. As demonstrated in previous works from the authors, this approach is able to cope with the complexity of the physical phenomena involved (i.e. turbulent noise generation, laminar-to-turbulent transition, etc.), even though the numerical model requires a careful setup of the mesh topology, boundary conditions and simulation parameters. The aim of this article is to provide the scientific community with the latest developments of our research work on numerical modelling of broadband noise from axial fans, focusing on the performance of two different mesh topologies to locate and estimate the noise sources.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Gregor Müller, Gottfried Grabner, Michael Wiesenegger, Jörg Jany
The optimal styling of the exterior surface of a vehicle and its suspension system have a direct impact on interior wind noise. Both are determined in early project phases when no hardware prototype is available. Turbulent flows produce both external pressure fluctuations at the vehicle shell, known as hydrodynamic excitation, and sound waves, known as acoustic excitation. Hydrodynamic and acoustic sound sources are evaluated separately and relative to each other in the frequency domain in order to perform evaluations of different body shapes. The technical aim of the presented work is to investigate how acoustic quantities measured at the outside of a vehicle can be used to assess the influence of styling modifications to interior sound pressure level. The methodology is required to be capable of being integrated into the serial development process and therefore be quickly applicable. MAGNA STEYR Engineering has conducted extensive research to develop a method to ensure the best option is selected in the early project stages.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Hiromichi Tsuji, Kimihiko Nakano PhD
This paper presents new technique to estimate the projected operational forces, which is the operational forces with respect to the evaluation location, at the connections of the separated passive substructures with reciprocity. Since the transfer path analysis (TPA) is conducted with respect to the evaluation location, the forces for the substructures are, therefore, also required only to estimate the projected operational forces. In order to estimate the forces, the projected inertance matrix, which is the projection of the inertance matrix onto the subspace with respect to the evaluation location, is estimated without measuring it directly. The acceleration responses at the connections of the passive substructure are measured by the excitation at the evaluation location with the reciprocity. The technique decomposes the acceleration responses into the output and input element vectors on the subspace. With those vectors, the projected inertance matrix is constructed. The projected operational forces at the passive substructure can be estimated by the operational accelerations pre-multiplied by the inverted projected inertance matrix.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Kasper Steen Andersen, Fuyang Liu
The tailpipe noise from an aftertreatment system must comply with legislation and meet customer expectations. The approach to capture the influence of complicated geometries and the ceramic substrates included in full aftertreatment systems (ATS) is implemented by coupling the 1D analytical solution of the substrates with the 3D FEM solution. The simulations are verified with measurements in a flow acoustic test rig.
Technical Paper
2014-06-30
Augusto Medeiros, Tiago Macarios, Gregorio Azevedo, Bryce Gardner
Abstract Transmission loss (TL) is a common metric for the comparison of the acoustic performance of mufflers. Muffler TL can be computed from a Boundary Element Method (BEM) model. Perforated tube elements are commonly used in automotive muffler applications. These can be modeled with a detailed BEM model that includes each individual hole in the perforated tube. The main drawback with such a straightforward BEM approach is that the discretionary of the perforated surfaces can result in computationally expensive models. The current work uses an approach that is a more computationally-efficient, yet, precise way of modeling complex mufflers that contain perforated surfaces with BEM. In this approach, instead of explicitly modeling the perforations explicitly they are taken into account as equivalent transfer impedances. There are several models in the literature that can be used to develop the transfer impedance model of the perforated surface. This paper investigates how these models can be used in a BEM prediction and also how one needs to be careful in selecting the cases used to evaluate the models.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 7320

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: