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2018-10-01 ...
  • October 1-5, 2018 (8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Engineering Academies
This Engineering Academy covers a variety of vehicle noise control engineering principles and practices. Two specialty tracks are available: Vehicle Interior Noise and Powertrain Noise. While the Vehicle Interior Noise track focuses on the understanding and application of acoustical materials to optimize NVH in the passenger or operator compartment of a vehicle, the Powertrain Noise track focuses on NVH issues generated by powertrain noise sources and the design strategies to minimize them. Noise sources include engines, transmissions/transfer cases, accessories, exhaust, gears, axles, joints, and couplings.
2018-10-01 ...
  • October 1-5, 2018 (8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Engineering Academies
This Engineering Academy covers a variety of vehicle noise control engineering principles and practices. Two specialty tracks are available: Vehicle Interior Noise and Powertrain Noise. While the Powertrain Noise track focuses on NVH issues generated by powertrain noise sources and the design strategies to minimize them, the Vehicle Interior Noise track focuses on the understanding and application of acoustical materials to optimize NVH in the passenger or operator compartment of a vehicle. Considerable attention is given to current measurement and instrumentation technologies and their effective use.
2018-06-05 ...
  • June 5-7, 2018 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This web seminar provides an in-depth overview of diesel engine noise including combustion and mechanical noise sources. In addition, the instructor will discuss a system approach to automotive integration including combining sub-systems and components to achieve overall vehicle noise and vibration goals.
2018-05-10 ...
  • May 10-11, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The sound package materials for vehicle noise control seminar provides a detail and thorough analysis of three different classes of acoustical materials – namely absorbers, barriers, and dampers, how they are different from each other, and acoustical properties that materials should possess for optimum vehicle noise control. The seminar addresses new advances in acoustical materials, primarily in absorption materials that impact the vehicle acoustics. The seminar covers ways to evaluate the acoustical performance of these materials using different test methods, including material, component, and vehicle level measurements.
2018-03-23 ...
  • March 23, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • October 19, 2018 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Palm Desert, California
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Brake noise is one of the highest ranked complaints of car owners. Grunts, groans, squeaks, and squeals are common descriptions of the annoying problem which brake engineers spend many hours trying to resolve. Consumer expectations and the high cost of warranty repairs are pushing the optimization of brake NVH performance. This course will provide you with an overview of the various damping mechanisms and tools for analyzing and reducing brake noise. A significant component of this course is the inclusion of case studies which will demonstrate how brake noise squeal issues have been successfully resolved.
2018-01-10 ...
  • January 10-19, 2018 (4 Sessions) - Live Online
  • August 21-30, 2018 (4 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This four-session web seminar provides a detailed understanding of the source – path-receiver relationship for developing appropriate sound package treatments in vehicles, including automobiles, commercial vehicles, and other transportation devices. The course provides a detailed overview of absorption, attenuation (barrier), and damping materials and how to evaluate their performances on material, component, and vehicle level applications. A significant part of this course is the case studies that demonstrate how properly designed sound package materials successfully address vehicle noise issues.
2017-11-17
WIP Standard
J1242
The scope of this SAE Information Report is to supply the user with sufficient information so that he may decide whether acoustic emission test methods apply to his particular inspection problem. Detailed technical information can be obtained by referring to Section 2.
2017-11-16
WIP Standard
J2786
This document defines various vehicular noises and vibrations that are attributed to being created by the brake system of the vehicle. These definitions cover both disc and drum brakes. The frequency ranges from near zero hertz (tactile sensations) all the way up to 17 kilohertz, or the upper limit of normal hearing. These noises and vibrations may either directly radiate off the brake system or provide the excitation energy that cause other vehicle components to react.
CURRENT
2017-09-19
Standard
AIR902A
This document describes a practical system for a user to determine observer-to-aircraft distances. These observer-to-aircraft distances can be either closest point of approach (CPA) distances during field measurements or overhead distances during acoustic certification tests. The system uses a digital camera to record an image of the subject aircraft. A method of using commercial software to obtain the distance from such an image is presented. Potential issues which may affect accuracy are discussed.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2528
Seongjoo Lee, JeSung Jeon, JooSeong Jeong, Byeongkyu Park, ShinWook Kim, ShinWan Kim, Seong Kwan Rhee, Wan Gyu Lee, Young sun Cho
It is widely believed or speculated that higher pad compressibility leads to reduced brake squeal and that caliper design can affect brake squeal. After encountering anecdotal contradictory cases, this investigation was undertaken to systematically generate basic data and clarify the beliefs or speculations. In order to adjust pad compressibility, it is common to modify pad molding temperatures, pressures and times, which in addition to changing the compressibility, changes friction coefficient and physical properties of the pad at the same time. In order to separate these two effects, NAO disc pads were prepared under the same molding conditions while using different thicknesses of the underlayer to achieve different compressibilities, thus changing the compressibility only without changing the friction coefficient and physical properties of the pad.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2489
Christian Ball, Li Lee, Weicherng Wang
Abstract The standard method for using FEA to predict and eliminate brake squeal has been to use complex eigenvalue analysis (CEA). Energy flow analysis has been adapted for use with FEA for brake squeal as an alternate mechanism for squeal prediction. This paper demonstrates an implementation of energy flow analysis with commercially available FEA software. The approach leverages the ability of commercial FEA solvers to obtain a quasi-static, pre-loaded brake model, as well as their eigenvalue extraction algorithms to create a modal space for energy flow calculations. The modal spaces as well as the pre-loaded stiffness matrix are then utilized to calculate energy flow values between nearby system modes. Three case studies are presented that compare the results of CEA and energy flow to different systems and countermeasures adopted to reduce noise occurrence in physical testing.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2488
Manuel Pürscher, Peter Fischer
Abstract Vehicle road tests are meaningful for investigations of creep groan noise. However, problems in reproducing experiments and partly subjective evaluations may lead to imprecise conclusions. This work proposes an experimental test and evaluation procedure which provides a precise and objective assessment of creep groan. It is based on systematic corner test rig experiments and an innovative characterization method. The exemplary setup under investigation consisted of a complete front wheel suspension and brake system including all relevant components. The wheel has been driven by the test rig’s drum against a brake torque. The main parameters within a test matrix were brake pressure and drum velocity. Both have been varied stepwise to scan the relevant operating range of the automobile corner system for potential creep groan noise. Additionally, the experiments were extended to high brake pressures, where creep groan cannot be observed under road test conditions.
2017-09-17
Journal Article
2017-01-2482
Meechai Sriwiboon, Nipon Tiempan, Kritsana Kaewlob, Seong K Rhee, Donald Yuhas
Abstract Disc pad physical properties are believed to be important in controlling brake friction, wear and squeal. Thus these properties are carefully measured during and after manufacturing for quality assurance. For a given formulation, disc pad porosity is reported to affect friction, wear and squeal. This investigation was undertaken to find out how porosity changes affect pad natural frequencies, dynamic modulus, hardness and compressibility for a low-copper formulation and a copper-free formulation, both without underlayer, without scorching and without noise shims. Pad natural frequencies, modulus and hardness all continuously decrease with increasing porosity. When pad compressibility is measured by compressing several times as recommended and practiced, the pad surface hardness is found to increase while pad natural frequencies and modulus remain essentially unchanged.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2487
Yasuyuki Kanehira, Yusuke Aoki, Yukio Nishizawa
Abstract Brake squeal is uncomfortable noise that occurs while braking. It is an important issue for automobile quality to prevent brake products from squealing. Brake shims are widely used to reduce squeal occurrence rate. In particular, laminated shims can effectively suppress squeal via the viscoelastic damping of an adhesive layer. However, there are cases where the damping performance at low temperature and the durability performance at high temperature deteriorate. In that regard, we thought of applying frictional damping to shims instead of relying on a temperature-sensitive adhesive layer. To study the application of frictional damping for shims, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics thereof. In order to quantify the damping performance of shims, loss factor has been generally measured with a bending mode tester. However, the influence of friction cannot be evaluated because it is measured under pressure-free condition.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2486
Kyung Jae Lee, Dong Won Kim, Daekyung Ko
Abstract Brake grinding noise is caused by the friction of the disc and pads. The friction generates vibration and it transmits to the body via the chassis system. We called it structure-borne noise. To improve the noise in the vehicle development, the aspects of chassis or body's countermeasure occurs many problems, cost and time. In this reason many brake companies try to make solution with brake system, like brake pad materials or disc surface condition. However the countermeasures of excitation systems also have a lot of risk. It could be occurred side-effects of braking performance, and need to re-verify brake noise like Creep-groan, Groan, Squeal, Judder and so on. For this reason, it is essential to make a robust chassis system in the initial development stage of the vehicle for the most desirable grinding noise-resistant vehicle. This paper is about rear brake grind noise path analysis and countermeasure of chassis system. There are two steps to analysis.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2485
Tarun Teja Mallareddy, Peter Blaschke, Sarah Schneider, Daniel J. Alarcón
Abstract Brake squeal is an NVH issue experienced by brake systems and vehicle manufacturers for decades. This leads to customer dissatisfaction and the questioning of the quality of the brake system. Advanced testing tools, design modification, dynamometer testing, vehicle validation etc., are performed to study, analyze and eliminate this problem. But still it continues to exist nowadays. One of the most important reasons is the complexity of the brake pad having non-linear material properties. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the behavior of the brake pad in terms of its dynamic properties (eigenfrequencies, damping and mode shapes) under varying boundary conditions. Experimental Modal Analysis (EMA) is used to study the dynamic properties of any structure and is generally performed under free-free boundary conditions. An approach to study brake pads under pressure condition is a step towards reality, as brake pads squeal only during braking events.
2017-09-17
Technical Paper
2017-01-2484
Yoshiyuki Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi Kondo
Abstract Previous studies have shown that the disc vibration mode during braking noise is not always the same and there are some types of mode. Until now, disc brake noise studies are reported regarding out of plane noise primarily, and there are many noise countermeasure methods. On the other hand, there is short research history of “Inplane mode noise” which disc vibrates to circumstance direction with extension and contraction movement. Therefore, there are few studies which are explained the noise mechanism in detail in the view point of pad. In this report, we discuss energy which flows into pad surface at inplane noise braking and focused friction force variation by the surface pressure change especially. The inflow energy was calculated by the pad’s displacement of disc rotating direction(ΔX) and pad thickness variation(Δh) which is acquired by 3D scanning laser Doppler measurement system. This technique was made in reference to the past research.
2017-09-17
Journal Article
2017-01-2523
Seonho Lee, Yoongil Choi, Kyuntaek Cho, Hyounsoo Park
Abstract Raceway Brinell damage is one major cause of wheel bearing (hub unit) noise during driving. Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) customers have asked continuously for its improvement to the wheel bearing supply base. Generally, raceway Brinelling in a wheel hub unit is a consequence of metallic yielding from high external loading in a severe environment usually involving a side impact to the wheel and tire. Thus, increasing the yielding strength of steel can lead to higher resistance to Brinell damage. Both the outer ring and hub based on Generation 3 (Gen. 3) wheel unit are typically manufactured using by AISI 1055 bearing quality steel (BQS); these components undergo controlled cooling to establish the core properties then case hardening via induction hardening (IH). This paper presents a modified grade of steel and its IH design that targets longer life and improves Brinell resistance developed by ILJIN AMRC (Advanced Materials Research Center).
2017-09-17
Journal Article
2017-01-2529
Jae Seol Cho, JongYun Jeong, Hyoung Woo Kim, Hwa Sun Lee, Yang Woo Park, Junghwan Lim, Yoonjae Kim, Jinwoo Kim, Byung Soo Joo, Ho Jang
Abstract A semi-empirical index to evaluate the noise propensity of brake friction materials is introduced. The noise propensity index (NPI) is based on the ratio of surface and matrix stiffness of the friction material, fraction of high-pressure contact plateaus on the sliding surface, and standard deviation of the surface stiffness of the friction material that affect the amplitude and frequency of the stick-slip oscillation. The correlation between noise occurrence and NPI was examined using various brake linings for commercial vehicles. The results obtained from reduced-scale noise dynamometer and vehicle tests indicated that NPI is well correlated with noise propensity. The analysis of the stick-slip profiles also indicated that the surface property affects the amplitude of friction oscillation, while the mechanical property of the friction material influences the propagation of friction oscillation after the onset of vibration.
2017-08-04
Magazine
Opposed-piston engines: the powerplant of the future India's dream of an all-EV fleet by 2030: Myth, miracle, or reality? An approach for prediction of motorcycle engine noise under combustion load Innovations for lightweighting Tough U.S. fuel-economy bogies for 2021 and beyond are driving new approaches for materials, as seen in these examples. More intelligence equals more efficiency, enhanced functionality Advanced electronic systems require renewed focus on architectures, processors, sensors and networks. Connected commercial vehicles bring cybersecurity to the fore Connectivity, automation and electrification will drive vehicle development in the near future, say industry experts attending the revamped SAE COMVEC 17 event.
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