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Training / Education
2015-08-24
Improved understanding and control of ignition and thereby combustion are critical in dealing with the problems of pollutants formation, engine performance, and fuel economy. This seminar will provide you with basic knowledge and recent advances in combustion-initiation (ignition) issues to more intelligently evaluate and harness their potentials. Thermodynamic and fluid mechanical properties of the unburned charge near the spark plug and at the time of ignition strongly affect the quality of the combustion and therefore the emission of the pollutants from the engine. Furthermore, a weak ignition limits engine performance and drivability.
Event
2015-06-22
This session includes papers in the areas of static, dynamic, and fatigue characterization of elastomers, bushings, mounts and shock absorbers used in the mobility industry. Particular emphasis is given to new and innovative analysis and testing methodologies to quantify the non-linear properties of these systems in addition to the effects of temperature, frequency, and aging. Papers dealing with specific applications and case studies of existing methodologies are also welcome.
Event
2015-06-22
This session is focused on base engine, mounts, accessories, fuel injection system, combustion system, transmission related design or development noise and vibration topics. The papers of this session will have both experimental and analytical approaches to problem solving.
Training / Education
2015-06-08
The advent of digital computers and the availability of ever cheaper and faster micro processors have brought a tremendous amount of control system applications to the automotive industry in the last two decades. From engine and transmission systems, to virtually all chassis subsystems (brakes, suspensions, and steering), some level of computer control is present. Control systems theory is also being applied to comfort systems such as climate control and safety systems such as cruise control or collision mitigation systems. This seminar begins by introducing the highly mathematical field of control systems focusing on what the classical control system tools do and how they can be applied to automotive systems.
Event
2015-03-23
Training / Education
2015-03-23
Heat transfer affects the performance, emissions and durability of the engine as well as the design, packaging, material choice and fatigue life of vehicle components. This course covers the broad range of heat transfer considerations that arise during the design and development of the engine and the vehicle with a primary focus on computational models and experimental validation covering the flow of heat from its origin in the engine cylinders and its transfer via multiple paths through engine components. Specifically, the course will cover heat transfer design considerations related to the following: engine cooling and lubrication systems as well as bay-to-bay breathing; exhaust system and after-treatment components; tail pipe gas temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between the engine and its exhaust system with the components in the vehicle under-hood and under-body; turbochargers; passenger cabin HVAC system, including windshield de-icing; battery cooling; heat exchangers and challenges associated with predicting thermal mechanical fatigue life of components.
Training / Education
2015-03-12
Vehicle functional requirements, emission regulations, and thermal limits all have a direct impact on the design of a powertrain cooling airflow system. Given the expected increase in emission-related heat rejection, suppliers and vehicle manufacturers must work together as partners in the design, selection, and packaging of cooling system components. An understanding and appreciation of airflow integration issues and vehicle-level trade-offs that effect system performance are important to the team effort. The severe duty cycles, minimal ram air, and sometimes unconventional package layouts present unique challenges.
Training / Education
2014-12-03
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%. This web seminar will explore turbocharging for gasoline and diesel (heavy and light duty) engines, including the fundamentals of turbocharging, design features, performance measures, and matching and selection criteria.
Event
2014-11-25
Event
2014-11-20
This session focuses on hardware attached to the engine such as support systems, injectors, EGR valves, manifolds, turbo-chargers, water pumps, and ignition systems.
Event
2014-11-20
This session focuses on hardware attached to the engine such as support systems, injectors, EGR valves, manifolds, turbo-chargers, water pumps, and ignition systems.
Event
2014-11-20
This session focuses on hardware attached to the engine such as support systems, injectors, EGR valves, manifolds, turbo-chargers, water pumps, and ignition systems.
Training / Education
2014-11-20
Engine valvetrain systems have become more capable and increasingly more compact in the quest to improve efficiency. The developments parallel the advancements in other key engine components such as fuel injection or spark systems, turbocharging, aftertreatment, base engine and controls. While the gasoline sector has seen a steady rise in the adoption of Variable Valve Actuation (VVA), Diesel systems have lagged behind and only a few systems have seen production. The level of VVA activity however in the Diesel sector is beginning to increase as tighter regulations of CO2 emissions approach. Valve control plays a strong role in a number of key areas: turbocharger systems, allowing for better optimization matching across wide engine operating flows; enabling advanced combustion strategies where control over the charge mass and temperature are important; and cold start, where valve timing can be extremely effective for engine warm up compared with other strategies that rely on additional fueling.
Event
2014-11-19
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-19
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza, Danilo D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta Panza
In the present work, an Auto Regressive (AR) model and a Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) are applied on vibrational signals, acquired by an accelerometer placed on the cylinder block of an internal combustion engine, for knock detection purposes. To this aim, vibrational signals are acquired on a four cylinder Spark Ignition engine for different engine speeds and spark advances. The same analysis is executed by also using the traditional MAPO (Maximum Amplitude of Pressure Oscillations) index, applied on the in-cylinder pressure waveforms. The results of the three methods are compared and in depth discussed to the aim of highlighting the pros and cons of each methodology. In particular, the problem of fixing a constant threshold level for each running condition is afforded and solved. The examples presented show the capability of the vibration based detection algorithms in accurately monitor the presence of heavy or soft knock phenomena, and to determine its intensity. Therefore, the possibility of implementation in modern on-board control units is foreseen, as well.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Koorosh Khanjani, Jiamei Deng, Andrzej Ordys
Controlling Variable Coolant Temperature in Internal Combustion Engines and Its Effects on Fuel Consumption Koorosh Khanjani ; Roehampton Vale Campus, Kingston University, Friars Avenue, London SW15 3DW; K1155703@kingston.ac.uk; Tel: +44 (0)208 417 4730; Jiamei Deng ; Roehampton Vale Campus, Kingston University, Friars Avenue, London SW15 3DW; J.Deng@kingston.ac.uk; Tel: +44 (0)208 417 4712; Andrzej Ordys ; Roehampton Vale Campus, Kingston University, Friars Avenue, London SW15 3DW; A.Ordys@kingston.ac.uk; +44 (0) 208 417 4846; Abstract: Increasing the efficiency and durability of internal combustion engines is one of the major concerns of engineers in development of modern road vehicles. Emission legislations are becoming stricter each year forcing manufacturers to deploy sophisticated engine control strategies to transfer more of the fuel chemical energy into power output. Internal combustion engines have now been equipped with electronic engine management control units which consist of precise measurements and performance by means of various sensors and actuators.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Christian Schweikert, David Witt, Dirk Schweitzer, Marco Nicolo, Liu chen
The market potential for products such as scooters and small motorcycles is already self sustaining. However, other applications for small engines can be more fragmented with a wide variety of requirements for the engine control unit. Consequently, the engine control unit is designed to accommodate more features than are necessary for a given application to cover a broader market. The flip side of this approach is to design the engine control unit for a limited application reducing the market size. Neither approach creates a cost efficient product for the producer. It either supplies the market with an electronic control unit that has features not being utilized (wasted costs) or a unit that has limited capabilities reducing the economies of scale (higher costs). When these designs are developed using discrete components these inefficiencies are exacerbated. Integration of these functions at the semiconductor level can mitigate these costs, improve the thermal performance or expand the functional capabilities to include additional vehicular control aspects in the electronic control unit.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Kenta Sugimoto
Cost reduction is an important development goal for small motorcycles. As a way to reduce costs, we have developed an electronically controlled fuel injection (hereafter FI) system without a throttle position sensor (hereafter TPS). Ordinarily, the high throttle range is controlled and computed by TPS, and the low throttle range by manifold pressure sensor (MPS). The intake airflow is estimated with consistent high precision regardless of the engine load, and the basic fuel injection is executed accordingly. Also, transient correction monitors the size of TPS changes, to inject fuel immediately when a TPS change equal to or greater than a threshold value is detected. In our development, we replaced these functions with control by MPS. For calculation of basic fuel injection quantity by MPS, we carried on the conventional method. However, MPS transient correction control had some aspects with poor tracking. Thus, we constructed a new form of transient correction control, securing the following points. - To estimate changed intake airflow, we calculated the size of MPS value changes between the previous cycle and the current cycle in the crank intake stroke, securing precision. - We distributed the locations for transient correction into three before the completion of the intake stroke, making it possible to supply the calculated transient correction values to the current intake stroke regardless of the throttle input or engine state. - We subtracted the manifold pressure change due to engine speed fluctuation from the MPS change calculated at the transient correction execution positions, preventing unintended injection while lowering the threshold value for transient correction.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Ken Fosaaen
Global concerns over pollution have led to increasingly strict emissions legislation targeting small engines, which currently pollute at a much greater level than modern multi-cylinder automotive engines. Closed-loop control may be required to meet many future legislation requirements; however, such systems can be impractical due to high added component costs. A necessary component for closed-loop engine control is an oxygen sensor. Existing automotive oxygen sensors are too large, require too much power, and far too expensive to be suitable for the vast majority of the global small engine applications; therefore, some manufacturers have developed smaller and/or unheated versions based on their existing sensors to meet this emerging need. The ability to miniaturize resistive based sensors well below that of traditional Nernst (zirconia based) oxygen sensors affords the opportunity to meet future emissions standards with less of an impact on cost. The performance of a novel low-cost, low-power, narrow-band resistive-based oxygen sensor was compared with the stock oxygen sensor and several other commercially available oxygen sensors on a 2014 Honda Grom 125E motorcycle.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Paolo Gai, Francesco Esposito, Riccardo Schiavi, Marco Di Natale, Claudio Diglio, Michele Pagano, Carlo Camicia, Luca Carmignani
The design and development of the electronic architecture and the control software integrated inside the next generation of two wheelers will be one of the major challenges for small engine products. The need for optimal fuel consumption and emission control, paired with strict safety requirements will force many manufacturers to reconsider their electronic architecture adding complex functions with the risk of incurring in additional costs to be carefully planned in the product roadmap. These challenges have already been tackled twenty years ago by the automotive manufacturers, generating a set of standards in an attempt to improve productivity and quality by standardization, interoperability and competition on functional content. The result has been the development of distributed software architectures based on the CAN bus and the OSEK/VDX[8] standard, and more recently with the AUTOSAR[4] initiative. Therefore, a set of automotive standards are available and can be used as an inspiration as they share common goals such as portability, reusability, and limited footprint; on the other side, the inherent complexity and license cost of complete commercial bundles makes the adoption of these automotive standards impracticable for low-cost engines.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Klaus Stuhlmüller
In a microcontroller-operated ignition process, the combustion is dependent on three important criteria: Spark burn duration, ignition voltage, and ignition spark energy. These criteria must be adapted exactly to the engine's individual requirement profile to ensure optimal combustion. In each operating state and operating environment, optimum ignition is ensured by continuously analyzing sensor values. Engine manufacturers continue to be faced with the challenge of ensuring that the machine runs as smoothly and quietly as possible. Increased spark duration and higher energy of the ignition spark enable improved combustion of the gasoline-air mixture in the combustion compartment. This article describes an electrical ignition process using an array of multiple coils and a magnetic generator that is rotating in sync with the machine. During this process the magnetic field temporarily flows through the coils and generates a sequence of magnetic flow variations per rotation. This induces corresponding half-waves of alternating voltage in the coils of the ignition module.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Onorino Di Tanna, Mario Santucci, Sergio Matteo Savaresi
This paper presents an active fuel-saving strategy for powered two-wheelers, based on an innovative Performance Management System (PMS). In particular, a novel model-based PMS is proposed, which aims at reducing the fuel consumption on board by actively modifying or suggesting the driving-style in real-time. The proposed PMS is capable of tracking a desired fuel rate by means of speed and acceleration controllers that alter the vehicle dynamics conforming to the high-level torque/power control policies. Simulation and experimental results prove the feasibility of the proposed approach.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Jens Steinmill, Ralf Struzyna
Authors: Dipl.-Ing. Jens Steinmill, Dipl.-Ing. Ralf Struzyna, Prof.Dr.-Ing. Wolfgang Eifler Department for Combustion Engines, Ruhr-University Bochum , D-44801 Bochum, Germany Contact: e-mail: Jens.Steinmill@rub.de | phone: +49234-3227404 | fax: +49234-3207404 The control and regulation of internal combustion engines for use in nano-CHP units has not yet reached the state of the art, which is common in the automotive industry. Frequently, the engines are operated in a stationary operating point without adjustment of the combustion process. In the automotive sector is the torque structure prior art. The requested torque by driver, which is derived from the accelerator pedal position is coordinated with the other torque requests and converted in the simplest case, into a desired air-charge, ignition angle and amount of fuel. The actuators on the engine, for example, Throttle, ignition and injectors are triggered. At a nano-CHP unit, the target size of the motor controller is is not mechanical torque, but thermal and mechanical power.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Yuta Kugimachi, Yusuke Nakamura, Norimasa Iida
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine has several advantages of high thermal efficiency and low emission over the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engine and Compression Ignition (CI) engine. Although one way to achieve higher loads without knocking in HCCI engine is the combustion phasing retard, it is difficult to control a combustion-phasing since there is no external combustion trigger for controlling ignition like spark ignition and diesel fuel injection. Futhermore, recent researches show that too much combustion-phasing retard leads to unacceptable cycle-to-cycle variation of Pressure Rise Rate (PRR) and Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP). Therefore, it is necessary to construct a HCCI combustion control system to control a combustion-phasing at constant phasing in the expansion stroke accurately to get the high load without knocking. This study investigates the HCCI combustion control system and the algorithm as a means of extending the limit of IMEP of HCCI combustion at high load for realize HCCI engine fuelled with Dimethyl Ether (DME).
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