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2017-04-04
Event
The design, development, and testing of Valve Train and Variable Valve Actuation mechanisms, devices, and systems; and the impact and control of such systems on thermodynamics, combustion, fuel economy, emissions, noise and vibration, and performance.
2017-04-04
Event
Powertrain Electronics play a key role in meeting today's complex emissions and performance requirements, on-board diagnostics, legislated regulations, and product flexibility. This session explores the challenges and future prospects for powertrain controls, including on-board diagnostics, integration with transmissions, flash programming, service, software design and development, unit and system test, and electronics architecture today and in the future.
2017-04-04
Event
Mixed modes with both flame propagation and slow auto ignition. Distinct from SI knock: autoignition is desired and will not ruin the engine. Papers describing experiments and test data, simulation results focused on applications, fuel/additive effects, and SACI mode change are invited and will be placed in appropriate sub-sessions. Papers with an emphasis on the modeling aspects of combustion are encouraged to be submitted into PFL 110 or PFL120 modeling sessions.
2017-04-04
Event
This session considers modeling (zero-D, 1D, 2D, 3D CFD) and experimental papers on: combustion chamber, systems (lubrication, cooling, fuel, EGR); components (oil pumps, coolant pump, fuel injectors, compressors, turbines, turbochargers, torque converters, gear box, fans, bearings, valves, ports, manifolds, turbine housing); heat exchangers (radiators, oil coolers); aftertreatment (SCR, DOC, DOF, exhaust gas cooling); battery cooling (HEV, EV, motor/generator) and controls (passive and active).
2017-04-04
Event
Separate sub-sessions cover powertrain control, calibration, and system-level optimization processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and subsystems related to energy management in conventional and hybrid operation, considering the simultaneous optimization of hardware design parameters and control software calibration parameters.
2017-04-04
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-04-04
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2017-04-04
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2017-04-04
Event
This session covers powertrain control processes related to achieving stringent market fuel economy, emissions, performance, reliability, and quality demands of hybrid and electric powertrains. Topics include the control, calibration, and diagnostics of the engine, powertrain, and supporting electromechanical subsystems related to energy management.
2016-11-30 ...
  • November 30-December 2, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2016-11-22
Event
2016-11-17
Event
This session focuses on hardware attached to the engine such as support systems, injectors, EGR valves, manifolds, turbo-chargers, water pumps, and ignition systems.
2016-11-15
Event
This session will focus on the structure, processing, and properties of materials in small engine applications. Some possible topics include lightweighting of engine and vehicle components; heat treatment and surface processing; fatigue, fracture, and wear; coatings; and advanced ceramic, metallic, and polymeric materials.
2016-11-15
Event
This session will focus on the structure, processing, and properties of materials in small engine applications. Some possible topics include lightweighting of engine and vehicle components; heat treatment and surface processing; fatigue, fracture, and wear; coatings; and advanced ceramic, metallic, and polymeric materials.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0061
Da Wang, Dingchao Qian, Bo Wang
This article summarized the development methods and technical experiences on Formula Student race car engines acquired by Jilin University during 2011 and 2015. This series of engines are all based on 600cc 4-cylinder motorcycle gasoline engines and are modified to turbocharged engine within the Formula Student technical regulations, in order to achieve higher power output, wider torque band as well as lower fuel consumption. During the development process, multiple researches have been conducted surrounding the turbocharging technology. These researches covered areas including the matching of the flow rate characteristics of the engine and the turbocharger, the design of intake and exhaust systems, research on the wastegate as well as its actuator, the selection and control of boost pressure as well as the design of the lubrication system on the turbocharger, etc.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0078
Mark R. Mataczynski, Paul Litke, Benjamin Naguy, Jacob Baranski
Aircraft engine performance is degraded with increasing altitude according to the resultant reduction in air pressure, temperature, and density. One way to mitigate this problem is through turbo-normalization of the air being supplied to the engine. Supercharger and turbocharger components suffer from a well-recognized loss in efficiency as they are scaled down in order to match the reduced mass flow demands of small-scale Internal Combustion Engines. This is due in large part to problems related to machining tolerance limitations, such as the increase in relative operating clearances, and increased relative blade thickness. As Internal Combustion Engines decrease in size, they also suffer from efficiency losses owing primarily to thermal losses. This amplifies the importance of maximizing the efficiency of all sub-systems in order to minimize fuel consumption and enhance overall aircraft performance.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0077
Roland Baar, Valerius Boxberger, Maike Sophie Gern
On a worldwide scale, turbocharged four-cylinder engines are the most used ones in automotive industries. Three-cylinder engine is a technical alternative because of its higher thermodynamic potential that is due to higher cylinder displacement. Following this trend, the interest in two-cylinder engines is growing. These do have special demands concerning uniformity and dynamics of oscillating masses and firing order, but also very different conditions for the turbocharger. With two-cylinder engines, the pulsating influence grows and changes the operation of the turbine. In this paper different boosting technologies are compared in small engine applications. Besides of turbochargers the potentials and limits of superchargers and electric chargers as well as their combinations are compared. These technologies show dissimilarities concerning power supply, operation range and efficiency, and these effects have different meaning in small engines.
2016-11-08
Technical Paper
2016-32-0009
Yuki Takamura, Takahiro Shima, Hirotaka Suzuki, Keito Agui, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) combustion has attracted widespread interest as a combustion system that offers the advantages of high efficiency and low exhaust emissions. However, it is difficult to control the ignition timing in an HCCI combustion system owing to the lack of a physical means of initiating ignition like the spark plug in a gasoline engine or fuel injection in a diesel engine. Moreover, because the mixture ignites simultaneously at multiple locations in the cylinder, it produces an enormous amount of heat in a short period of time, which causes greater engine noise, abnormal combustion and other problems in the high load region. The purpose of this study was to expand the region of stable HCCI engine operation by finding a solution to these issues of HCCI combustion.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 13555

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