Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 12772
Training / Education
2015-09-24
Rapid advances have been made in the range of available designs and operational parameters as well as in the fundamental understanding of compact heat exchangers (CHEs). Since the majority of modern heat exchangers used for heating and cooling systems for vehicular applications are CHEs, keeping up to date with these advances is essential. This seminar will help you understand and be able to apply comprehensive information about the intricacies of CHE design, performance, operating problems and state-of-the-art-technology for car and truck applications.
Training / Education
2015-08-24
Improved understanding and control of ignition and thereby combustion are critical in dealing with the problems of pollutants formation, engine performance, and fuel economy. This seminar will provide you with basic knowledge and recent advances in combustion-initiation (ignition) issues to more intelligently evaluate and harness their potentials. Thermodynamic and fluid mechanical properties of the unburned charge near the spark plug and at the time of ignition strongly affect the quality of the combustion and therefore the emission of the pollutants from the engine. Furthermore, a weak ignition limits engine performance and drivability.
Event
2015-06-22
This session includes papers in the areas of static, dynamic, and fatigue characterization of elastomers, bushings, mounts and shock absorbers used in the mobility industry. Particular emphasis is given to new and innovative analysis and testing methodologies to quantify the non-linear properties of these systems in addition to the effects of temperature, frequency, and aging. Papers dealing with specific applications and case studies of existing methodologies are also welcome.
Event
2015-06-22
This session is focused on base engine, mounts, accessories, fuel injection system, combustion system, transmission related design or development noise and vibration topics. The papers of this session will have both experimental and analytical approaches to problem solving.
Training / Education
2015-06-08
The advent of digital computers and the availability of ever cheaper and faster micro processors have brought a tremendous amount of control system applications to the automotive industry in the last two decades. From engine and transmission systems, to virtually all chassis subsystems (brakes, suspensions, and steering), some level of computer control is present. Control systems theory is also being applied to comfort systems such as climate control and safety systems such as cruise control or collision mitigation systems. This seminar begins by introducing the highly mathematical field of control systems focusing on what the classical control system tools do and how they can be applied to automotive systems.
Training / Education
2015-03-23
Heat transfer affects the performance, emissions and durability of the engine as well as the design, packaging, material choice and fatigue life of vehicle components. This course covers the broad range of heat transfer considerations that arise during the design and development of the engine and the vehicle with a primary focus on computational models and experimental validation covering the flow of heat from its origin in the engine cylinders and its transfer via multiple paths through engine components. Specifically, the course will cover heat transfer design considerations related to the following: engine cooling and lubrication systems as well as bay-to-bay breathing; exhaust system and after-treatment components; tail pipe gas temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between the engine and its exhaust system with the components in the vehicle under-hood and under-body; turbochargers; passenger cabin HVAC system, including windshield de-icing; battery cooling; heat exchangers and challenges associated with predicting thermal mechanical fatigue life of components.
Event
2015-03-16
Training / Education
2015-03-12
Vehicle functional requirements, emission regulations, and thermal limits all have a direct impact on the design of a powertrain cooling airflow system. Given the expected increase in emission-related heat rejection, suppliers and vehicle manufacturers must work together as partners in the design, selection, and packaging of cooling system components. An understanding and appreciation of airflow integration issues and vehicle-level trade-offs that effect system performance are important to the team effort. The severe duty cycles, minimal ram air, and sometimes unconventional package layouts present unique challenges.
Training / Education
2015-03-10
Driven by the need for lower emissions, better fuel economy and improved drive quality, optimized powertrain calibrations are required for the many different vehicle configurations on today's roadways. While powertrain components such as the internal combustion engine, transmission, and hybrid electric powertrain are somewhat familiar to the automotive industry, the control theory, calibrations and system interactions between these components are a relatively unfamiliar aspect. This web seminar will introduce participants to the concepts behind optimized powertrain calibrations and how they impact fuel consumption, exhaust emissions, and vehicle performance.
Training / Education
2015-03-04
Societal and regulatory demands to lower emissions and increase engine-operating efficiencies have forced engine designers to adopt new technologies and control strategies. This has resulted in dramatic evolutions of the technology of internal combustion engines and their support systems in recent years. These operational management strategies have evolved into more robust control systems and sensory packages, which in turn has driven the need for more accurate and specific information being communicated between the various systems found within a modern automobile. This seminar will expose you to the emerging technologies in engine design and operation that can significantly improve operational efficiencies.
Training / Education
2015-03-02
In your profession, an educated understanding of internal combustion engines is required, not optional. This two-day technology survey seminar covers the most relevant topics - ranging from the chemistry of combustion to the kinematics of internal components of the modern internal combustion engine - for maximum comprehension. Attendees will gain a practical, hands-on approach to the basics of the most common designs of internal combustion engines, as they apply to the gaseous cycles, thermodynamics and heat transfer to the major components, and the design theories that embody these concepts.
Training / Education
2014-12-03
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%. This web seminar will explore turbocharging for gasoline and diesel (heavy and light duty) engines, including the fundamentals of turbocharging, design features, performance measures, and matching and selection criteria.
Event
2014-11-25
Training / Education
2014-11-20
Engine valvetrain systems have become more capable and increasingly more compact in the quest to improve efficiency. The developments parallel the advancements in other key engine components such as fuel injection or spark systems, turbocharging, aftertreatment, base engine and controls. While the gasoline sector has seen a steady rise in the adoption of Variable Valve Actuation (VVA), Diesel systems have lagged behind and only a few systems have seen production. The level of VVA activity however in the Diesel sector is beginning to increase as tighter regulations of CO2 emissions approach. Valve control plays a strong role in a number of key areas: turbocharger systems, allowing for better optimization matching across wide engine operating flows; enabling advanced combustion strategies where control over the charge mass and temperature are important; and cold start, where valve timing can be extremely effective for engine warm up compared with other strategies that rely on additional fueling.
Event
2014-11-19
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-19
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-19
This session focuses on hardware attached to the engine such as support systems, injectors, EGR valves, manifolds, turbo-chargers, water pumps, and ignition systems.
Event
2014-11-19
This session focuses on hardware attached to the engine such as support systems, injectors, EGR valves, manifolds, turbo-chargers, water pumps, and ignition systems.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Event
2014-11-18
Papers in this session are related to design, development and testing of new or innovative electronic controls or control systems for internal combustion engines. Topics may include hardware, software and algorithm/function innovations as well as the associated sensors or actuators employed in the control system. Applications may range from very simple systems for 1-cylinder engines to more complex systems for high-performance or multi-cylinder engines.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza, Danilo D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta Panza
In the present work, an Auto Regressive (AR) model and a Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) are applied on vibrational signals, acquired by an accelerometer placed on the cylinder block of an internal combustion engine, for knock detection purposes. To this aim, vibrational signals are acquired on a four cylinder Spark Ignition engine for different engine speeds and spark advances. The same analysis is executed by also using the traditional MAPO (Maximum Amplitude of Pressure Oscillations) index, applied on the in-cylinder pressure waveforms. The results of the three methods are compared and in depth discussed to the aim of highlighting the pros and cons of each methodology. In particular, the problem of fixing a constant threshold level for each running condition is afforded and solved. The examples presented show the capability of the vibration based detection algorithms in accurately monitor the presence of heavy or soft knock phenomena, and to determine its intensity. Therefore, the possibility of implementation in modern on-board control units is foreseen, as well.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Koorosh Khanjani, Jiamei Deng, Andrzej Ordys
Controlling Variable Coolant Temperature in Internal Combustion Engines and Its Effects on Fuel Consumption Koorosh Khanjani ; Roehampton Vale Campus, Kingston University, Friars Avenue, London SW15 3DW; K1155703@kingston.ac.uk; Tel: +44 (0)208 417 4730; Jiamei Deng ; Roehampton Vale Campus, Kingston University, Friars Avenue, London SW15 3DW; J.Deng@kingston.ac.uk; Tel: +44 (0)208 417 4712; Andrzej Ordys ; Roehampton Vale Campus, Kingston University, Friars Avenue, London SW15 3DW; A.Ordys@kingston.ac.uk; +44 (0) 208 417 4846; Abstract: Increasing the efficiency and durability of internal combustion engines is one of the major concerns of engineers in development of modern road vehicles. Emission legislations are becoming stricter each year forcing manufacturers to deploy sophisticated engine control strategies to transfer more of the fuel chemical energy into power output. Internal combustion engines have now been equipped with electronic engine management control units which consist of precise measurements and performance by means of various sensors and actuators.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Ken Fosaaen
Global concerns over pollution have led to increasingly strict emissions legislation targeting small engines, which currently pollute at a much greater level than modern multi-cylinder automotive engines. Closed-loop control may be required to meet many future legislation requirements; however, such systems can be impractical due to high added component costs. A necessary component for closed-loop engine control is an oxygen sensor. Existing automotive oxygen sensors are too large, require too much power, and far too expensive to be suitable for the vast majority of the global small engine applications; therefore, some manufacturers have developed smaller and/or unheated versions based on their existing sensors to meet this emerging need. The ability to miniaturize resistive based sensors well below that of traditional Nernst (zirconia based) oxygen sensors affords the opportunity to meet future emissions standards with less of an impact on cost. The performance of a novel low-cost, low-power, narrow-band resistive-based oxygen sensor was compared with the stock oxygen sensor and several other commercially available oxygen sensors on a 2014 Honda Grom 125E motorcycle.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Horizon Walker Gitano, Ray Chim, Jian Loh
Recent concern over air quality has lead to increasingly stringent emissions regulations on ever smaller displacement engines, resulting in the application of Electronic Fuel Injection to the 100cc-200cc class 2-wheelers in many countries. In the pursuit of ever smaller and less expensive EFI systems, a number of unique technologies are being explored, including resistive type oxygen sensors. In this paper we investigate the application of a small resistive oxygen sensor to a small motorcycle EFI system. Measurements of the exhaust system temperatures, and Air/Fuel Ratio ranges are carried out, and compared to the sensors response over this range to create an estimate of the sensors in-use performance. Actual sensor and temperature measurements are then compared to both a standard zirconia switching type oxygen sensor, and a wide-band oxygen sensor. Results are analyzed and indicate that the resistive type oxygen sensor should be capable of allowing the EFI controller to successfully control the vehicles AFR in all operating modes with a faster “light off” time, and lower overall current draw when compared to the standard heated zirconia sensor.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Kenta Sugimoto
Cost reduction is an important development goal for small motorcycles (1). As a way to reduce costs, we have developed an electronically controlled fuel injection (hereafter FI) system without a throttle position sensor (hereafter TPS). Ordinarily, the high throttle range is controlled and computed by TPS, and the low throttle range by manifold pressure sensor (hereafter MPS). The intake airflow is estimated with consistent high precision regardless of the engine load, and the basic fuel injection is executed accordingly. Also, transient correction monitors the size of TPS changes, to inject fuel immediately when a TPS change equal to or greater than a threshold value is detected. In our development, we replaced these functions with control by MPS. For calculation of basic fuel injection quantity by MPS, we carried on the conventional method. However, MPS transient correction control had some aspects with poor tracking. Thus, we constructed a new form of transient correction control, securing the following points. - To estimate changed intake airflow, we calculated the size of MPS value changes between the previous cycle and the current cycle in the crank intake stroke, securing precision. - We distributed the locations for transient correction into three before the completion of the intake stroke, making it possible to supply the calculated transient correction values to the current intake stroke regardless of the throttle input or engine state. - We subtracted the manifold pressure change due to engine speed fluctuation from the MPS change calculated at the transient correction execution positions, preventing unintended injection while lowering the threshold value for transient correction.
Technical Paper
2014-11-11
Kazuyoshi Shimatani
Various sensors including throttle position sensors (TPS), manifold pressure sensors (MPS), crank angle sensors, engine temperature sensors, and oxygen sensors are mounted in electronically controlled fuel injection (FI) systems to accurately regulate the air-fuel ratio according to the operating state and operating environment. Among these vehicle-mounted sensors, TPS has functions for detecting a fully-closed throttle and estimating intake air volume by the amount of throttle opening. Currently, we have conducted a study on transferring TPS functions into the MPS (manifold pressure sensor) in order to eliminate the TPS. Here we report on detecting a fully-closed throttle for achieving fuel cut control (FCC) and idle speed control (ISC) in fuel injection systems. We contrived a means for fully-closed throttle detection during ISC and controlling changes in the bypass opening during FCC in order to accurately judge each fully-closed throttle state via the manifold pressure. A factor in causing fluctuations in manifold pressure in a fully-closed throttle state are changes in the engine RPM (also referred to as engine speed) and changes in the degree of opening of the bypass (hereafter simply bypass opening).
Viewing 1 to 30 of 12772

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: